Creating a new stock

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Arlointact
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Joined: Fri Mar 20, 2015 3:50 pm

Creating a new stock

Post by Arlointact » Thu Mar 26, 2015 1:57 pm

What is the best way to create a new stock and forearm for a Savage 99? I have several with cracked/broken stocks and am at a loss on how to proceed.

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steamin10
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Re: Creating a new stock

Post by steamin10 » Thu Mar 26, 2015 9:13 pm

If you are handy and patient, you can make a pantograph copier out of wood and use a router motor, and various bits, down to a veining bit, and whittle it out of blank material.

Old hands marked out a blank in wood pencil and carved off the waste on a band saw. Then it was a matter of rasping the waste off and carefully measuring with standard calipers (transfer), and contours cut in card stock. Along surform grater can remove stock quickly, as a pantograph will leave furrows, to be smoothed.

Lots of hand work, and a labor of love.
Big Dave, former Millwright, Electrician, Environmental conditioning, and back yard Fixxit guy. Now retired, persuing boats, trains, and broken relics.
We have enough youth, how about a fountain of Smart. My computer beat me at chess, but not kickboxing
It is not getting caught in the rain, its learning to dance in it. People saying good morning, should have to prove it.

earlgo
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Location: NE Ohio

Re: Creating a new stock

Post by earlgo » Fri Mar 27, 2015 9:24 am

You might try to find a semi-inletted stock and forend from a vendor available on-line. A quick search for 'savage 99 semi-inletted stock blank' turned up several hits. One that was a possibility was:
http://www.gunstocksinc.com/web_pages/P ... stocks.htm

If this is your first stock, I'd highly recommend starting with a semi-inlet as most of the outside work is done, and it gives you the general shape but enough wood to customize to your taste.

Another is:
https://www.macongunstocks.com/

Warsaw, MO is where Reinhart Fajen and Bishop stock supplies were located. I used a few Fajen semis and they were always nice.
Here is one from Fajen for an 1889 Marlin.
Image

--earlgo
Before you do anything, you must do something else first. - Washington's principle.

redneckalbertan
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Location: South Central Alberta

Re: Creating a new stock

Post by redneckalbertan » Fri Mar 27, 2015 1:20 pm

Wow, that's a beautiful piece of wood! Not the utility grade fence posts on a lot of rifles now.

spro
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Location: mid atlantic

Re: Creating a new stock

Post by spro » Wed Apr 29, 2015 9:43 pm

That's really beautiful stock. Wood is a gift and knowing how to use it is something different. If I was smarter, I could read how that wood and grain profile was selected. Definitely exhibits knowledge.

PeteH
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Location: Northern New Jersey, USA

Re: Creating a new stock

Post by PeteH » Fri May 01, 2015 8:12 am

Good - or even decent - wood is getting "scarced-out". I have an old Remington 510 single-shot .22 that undoubtedly was a "catalog" gun back in the day, and the wood is better than that on most any gun I've bought that was made in the past 30 years.
Pete in NJ

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GeorgeGaskill
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Re: Creating a new stock

Post by GeorgeGaskill » Fri May 01, 2015 3:18 pm

Both Fajen and Bishop were bought by Midway. It looks like Macon has them now.

Richards Micro Fit is another semi-inletted stock maker.

SilveradoHauler
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Location: Port Angeles, WA

Re: Creating a new stock

Post by SilveradoHauler » Sun Jan 03, 2016 5:28 pm

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Last edited by SilveradoHauler on Mon Jan 04, 2016 9:40 am, edited 1 time in total.

SilveradoHauler
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Re: Creating a new stock

Post by SilveradoHauler » Sun Jan 03, 2016 7:09 pm

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Mach_Cat
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Re: Creating a new stock Long read instructions

Post by Mach_Cat » Wed Feb 03, 2016 1:39 am

When doing a stock like the 99 savage. The 1st place to start is the long hole through the stock.
This is done 1st as the hole seldom will come out where you want, and if you do last could waste all your work.
Mark the wood on the ends where you want the hole to go.
Generally you do the drilling on a lathe, drill bit in the head stock. A center in the tail stock and you push the stock into the bit slowly! remove and clean the bit frequently! as a clogged bit will not drill straight. I start with a short bit and then switch to a longer one. drill about half way through then turn the wood over and drill from the end. lining up the drill bit on the place you pushing with the center.
After drilling with the small bit then enlarge the butt end with a larger for the bolt head.
Once the drilling is done you work to fit the stock to the action. I use lots of soft cheap lipstick for this. (asking friends for stuff they do not use anymore is a good source, and people who sell makeup and and have old samples is great too)
Saw or mill a slot lined up on the drill hole. this should be smaller than the action tang.
Now coat the action with the lipstick. fit stock to action. Where the lipstick makes a mark remove with a chisel or file. Remove small amounts!
Repeat over and over until the action slides smoothly into the stock.
Okay now that you have that done then you start the process of shaping the wood to what you want.
It is done in this order so that as you shape the wood you can bolt and unbolt it from the action, shaping the wood to fit top and bottom of the action, and sides.
Hope this helps get you started.
Also on the 99 the wood should be firm against the shoulders and not quit touch on the round portion of the action. TOUCHING THERE IS WHAT SPLITS THE STOCK.

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