MIG for Cast Iron + Small Welding Table

Welding Techniques, Theory, Machines and Questions.

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warmstrong1955
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Re: MIG for Cast Iron + Small Welding Table

Post by warmstrong1955 » Sun Dec 11, 2016 2:55 pm

:lol:

Apparently you didn't get the memo...... The one with the most toys wins!

:)
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JackF
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Re: MIG for Cast Iron + Small Welding Table

Post by JackF » Mon Dec 12, 2016 11:17 am

I'm glad I followed this post. I need to get some S/S wire or tig filler rods for cast iron and give it a try. :)



Jack.

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SteveHGraham
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Re: MIG for Cast Iron + Small Welding Table

Post by SteveHGraham » Mon Apr 10, 2017 7:17 pm

This week I watched a show where they restore tanks. If I understood what they were saying, they were welding huge cast parts. The guy who was explaining it said he wanted to make it authentic, so he was using stainless filler...just like they did at the factory. So it looks like stainless filler and cast iron have been used together for quite some time.

I don't know if he preheated, but how much can you preheat a tank turret?
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steamin10
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Re: MIG for Cast Iron + Small Welding Table

Post by steamin10 » Mon Apr 10, 2017 9:15 pm

In the first place early tanks, and most german early series tanks, were fabbed from flat rolled ship armor, something they understood. German SP guns and various early Panthers had finger joint corners, that were welded over, and not finished too fine, to meet production rates. Stuart and similar early US tanks were riveted and that process was left behind for the more sturdy welding of flat plate, as many hulls for the M-3 and its variants, Firefly, and others, were often flat plate assembled at various plants without casting abilities. The turrets were cast or fabbed according to the uses, and were of tool steel quality with Chrome, and conditioners to make the armor. I assure you cast iron, is useless, when tried as armor, it is cast steels of various grades, and heat treated to tear and not shatter on impact. Low carbon steels, or bolt quality steels of high carbon are nearly as useless when subjected to solid rounds, as they cannot withstand the kenetic energy transfer. In history, the Germans streamlined their production, and eliminated many smaller guns, and simplified their production around the Krupp 88 mm guns. While technically wasteful of materials, it became an ace in the hole that became an all purpose gun with many abilities that could dominate a battle field with supperior range and destructive power above adversaries. Up gunned German tanks could easily destroy the M3 on the run, at extended ranges. because the M3 simply was no match for that ammunition. It was only volume of numbers that flooded the field that brought defeat to overwhelmed German forces.

Any way, to make a solid repair on tool steel base material, you use stainless wire of appropriate formula. All the weld repairs (hot tears, blows, surface leafs) on M-60 tank hull parts and turrets, were done in a proprietary stainless wire, by mig and stick. all fittings and lift eyes were done similarly. The assemblage of an M-60 hull weighs about 20 for the frontal slope casting, and the turret had to make 19.5 for minimum weight. The finish assembled hulland is comprised of 5 pieces jig fitted and stick welded together. two rolled armor belly plates are fitted to a forward nose section with top turret ring, followed by two side plates. These pieces are precision flame cut and fitted out in a jig/layout table, and all reference points are marked. Assembly is in a turnover (rotisserie) and all welding is essentially flat for control purposes, and final machining of all drive ports and suspension points are machined in, before we sent the finished hulls to the assembly plant. All parts were heat treated before welding, and no post treatment was done.

We cast the first base rings for the 'new' M1 Abrams, that is of a layered and stratified armor. It process is secret, although it can be discerned it includes ciramics, and has rarely been defeated in battle it is that good. Various units have been defeated from other failures, but the armor, as a system is the best in the world.
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SteveHGraham
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Re: MIG for Cast Iron + Small Welding Table

Post by SteveHGraham » Tue Apr 11, 2017 11:07 am

That's a lot of information. So the cast stuff on a WWII tank would have been steel, to prevent shattering?
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steamin10
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Re: MIG for Cast Iron + Small Welding Table

Post by steamin10 » Tue Apr 11, 2017 12:57 pm

A conditional yes is your anwer. The shermans that flooded the European theater, were of mixed heritage, with some mods being made depending on Date and plant of origin. It was designed to be Medium tank that could cross any country bridge, fit down narrow streets, and have good speed over rough terrain. As designed they were to be of cast armor jull and turrets for best protection, but lagging prodution forced various production methods to get numbers into the conflict. Overall, known and proven mechanicals helped front line units repair and salvage knocked out units, to be recrewed and sent back into the fight. Something like half of all units that recieved knockout damage, 19,000 units, were repaired, and sent back into action. Truly amazing history, if you care to read up some. The feared Panther V, vaunted the 'Most advanced tank of the war' was based on the Stu ll chasism a 36 ton unit, making the 45+ ton Panther a mechanicl joke. So it was with much of the German rush to improve and lead the game in innnovations. Sadly, the Shermans were dated by produstion time, and minor tweeks did nothing for the lost crews. Fighting a Sherman against suerior aror, was an art, but then its role was infantry support and breakout.

Actual tank on tank duals, were fewer than one would believe, most on either side being lost to air attacks, field gun ambush, and hand infantry weapons. The panther V could be destroyed by putting an 8 inch wooden log into the moving tracks. The drive gears would not withstand the strain, and would fail.

Sorry to get windy, this was about welding, and castings, rolled plate, and assemblies that were commonly welded, even with the relatively primitive methods used back then. Welding was still a young art then, and somewhat mysterious. All welded Liberty ships, would break in half in rough seas due to failed welds, and design streses, but the technology grew up from it. Now common guys like me have 4 machines, and TIG weld things only Buck Rogers could dream about back then.

Times change, and we must move with the times.
Big Dave, former Millwright, Electrician, Environmental conditioning, and back yard Fixxit guy. Now retired, persuing boats, trains, and broken relics.
We have enough youth, how about a fountain of Smart. My computer beat me at chess, but not kickboxing
It is not getting caught in the rain, its learning to dance in it. People saying good morning, should have to prove it.

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