Controlling Heavier TIG Filler Rod

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SteveHGraham
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Controlling Heavier TIG Filler Rod

Post by SteveHGraham » Sun Apr 02, 2017 5:36 pm

I'm back at the welding table today. Problem: I have no problems controlling a 1/16" filler rod, but a 3/32" rod loves to wobble because of the greater weight. This is particularly true when the rod is new, because it's longer, heavier, and has more leverage.

Is there a secret to overcoming this, or is it just a matter or practice?

Things are getting better. The welds are still not straight, but they look better, and I got myself a real jacket. I'm not dipping the tungsten in the weld any more, but I did get the filler rod stuck once. Man, it heats right up!
Don't trigger me, bro!

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warmstrong1955
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Re: Controlling Heavier TIG Filler Rod

Post by warmstrong1955 » Sun Apr 02, 2017 6:09 pm

Swack 'em in half with a pair of side cutters.

The little leftover pieces, I weld 'em on to longer pieces.

Bill
Today's solutions are tomorrow's problems.

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10KPete
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Re: Controlling Heavier TIG Filler Rod

Post by 10KPete » Sun Apr 02, 2017 6:14 pm

What Bill said!!!

Pete
Just tryin'

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SteveHGraham
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Re: Controlling Heavier TIG Filler Rod

Post by SteveHGraham » Sun Apr 02, 2017 6:28 pm

Slick!

Now if I can stop roasting the glove on my left hand...
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warmstrong1955
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Re: Controlling Heavier TIG Filler Rod

Post by warmstrong1955 » Sun Apr 02, 2017 6:39 pm

You can use a piece of wood or metal to rest your pinky on, instead of the work.
Easy enough to move the block along as you weld.
I have an assortment of blocks, steel & timber, in my TIG welding area. Timber is better, as it doesn't absorb the heat.

Bill
Today's solutions are tomorrow's problems.

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SteveHGraham
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Re: Controlling Heavier TIG Filler Rod

Post by SteveHGraham » Sun Apr 02, 2017 6:54 pm

Don't you start the wood smoking? Am I the only one who gets the workpiece really hot?
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STRR
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Re: Controlling Heavier TIG Filler Rod

Post by STRR » Sun Apr 02, 2017 6:56 pm

Steve,

Go to Welding Tips and Tricks . com. Get a TIG finger from Jody. You'll love it, I promise. Jody also has a whole bunch of videos on YouTube. A whole lot of great education there. User: welding tips and tricks.

Good Luck,
Terry

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SteveHGraham
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Re: Controlling Heavier TIG Filler Rod

Post by SteveHGraham » Sun Apr 02, 2017 7:02 pm

Thanks. I do have a TIG Finger, but I am roasting the LEFT glove with radiant heat from the work. I think I'm getting the glove too close because I'm not extending the filler enough.

I found an interesting TIG shield that holds two fingers, like a TIG Finger XL, and it also has a wrist attachment to keep it from falling off and rolling under the table, which is something the TIG Finger did about 93 times today.
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warmstrong1955
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Re: Controlling Heavier TIG Filler Rod

Post by warmstrong1955 » Sun Apr 02, 2017 7:09 pm

SteveHGraham wrote:Don't you start the wood smoking? Am I the only one who gets the workpiece really hot?
If it's too close, of course.
So....don't put it so close. It's a matter of setup.
If it has to be close, use a block of steel....and if it's a lot of welding, have a couple of blocks if one gets too hot.

:)
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warmstrong1955
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Re: Controlling Heavier TIG Filler Rod

Post by warmstrong1955 » Sun Apr 02, 2017 7:16 pm

FYI, I use wooden blocks all the time for MIG & stick welding too.
Besides keeping my hand away from the heat, it makes it easier to get to the right angle & position.
Being comfortable is very important.

Bill
Today's solutions are tomorrow's problems.

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10KPete
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Re: Controlling Heavier TIG Filler Rod

Post by 10KPete » Sun Apr 02, 2017 7:53 pm

Even back when I was young and didn't shake like a hard tail Harley I always used blocks, sticks, chunks, whatever, to position the work and me to best advantage. But I don't recall ever having the feed hand problem you're describing. Keep 6 to 8 inches of filler out past your fingers, at minimum. Even welding aluminum at very high amps (250-350) a foot of rod keeps the hand pretty safe from burning. Also don't be afraid to use a heavy glove on that hand for heavier work. Those nice thin feeley gloves are only intended for the lighter work. For most TIG work I use the cowhide truckers driving gloves. Wells-Lamont is a name that springs to mind..... For the heavier work, good heavy stick welding gloves are great.

Pete
Just tryin'

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BadDog
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Re: Controlling Heavier TIG Filler Rod

Post by BadDog » Sun Apr 02, 2017 9:34 pm

Like others said, hand bracing, I use it all the time (even MIG when doing important/delicate work). And positioning of course. But a huge thing that has helped me is the use of the high temp knit gloves. Ov-Glove(sp?) is a common brand, but I got another brand that has a higher rating. I first got them when I was taking a forged steel class with my son. Normal welding gloves were too heavy and cumbersome, and the lighter leather gloves (driving or roping) I had previously used for light TIG were not up to the heat by any means. So I got those and loved them for the forge, and they don't interfere with manual dexterity (or lack thereof) when doing delicate work with TIG. I also have a TIG finger, but rarely use it unless I'm trying to improve my (nearly non-existent) aluminum skills, and in fact haven't used it since getting the knit gloves.
Russ
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