Q: Need some boot purchasing advice

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diyer
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Q: Need some boot purchasing advice

Post by diyer » Wed Dec 13, 2017 9:19 pm

Hello members, I need some boots but I don't want to have to purchase a pair for every different type of job I am doing. I started out looking for a one boot does everything, but soon realized that is not possible, at least not advisable. I've accepted that fact. don't mind that at all. At least they will last longer if I have several kinds. But I still don't want to have to buy ten different kinds. I am not looking for casual boots for fashion purposes. I need practical boots. I don't want pink colored ones but other than that I have no fashion requirements. But I am overwhelmed as to what to. I'm hoping someone struggled with this too and came up with a reasonable practical solution as to what works without too much redundancy.

I like rubber for waterproof needs and I would want and use such boots for washing cars and deep snow shoveling (my footwear always get soaked). I like leather too. But Rubber gets hot and cloth tears. I prefer smooth leather stitch-down's that can be resoled, not new-buck or suede either. I greatly dislike any China made footwear and have never seen a Chinese made stitch-down's. Besides there are still plenty of quality made in USA boot manufacturers.

I need winter and summer boots. I suppose that's at least one insulated and one not. I don't want to have one for snow shoveling and another for travel and walking in snow away from home. I think I could combine those two types into one type . . . maybe a 12" high insulated hiking boot. I don't hunt or winter camp but should I ever get stranded, I would want something along those lines, warm, waterproof, and very supportive. I don't like or need Gore-Tex. So, here is where one problem comes up, say I am shoveling snow and I have some of those boots called mucks, well their fine for that activity, but then I have to change out of them when I'm done shoveling (I'm told they are not for walking far, lack support etc.). So, that s one scenario and problem I need to solve: To muck or not to muck. If I get lower 12 leather boots, I'll probably need a boot cover and pants cover for deeper snows, called gaitors.

I also do carpentry, plumbing, masonry, automotive work, camping & hiking. So, the carpenter needs protection from nails on the floor, the plumber needs water protection, the mason needs protection from mortar and cement. But many of those boots are too low. Four (4") inch, and six (6") inch are too low for walking in snow. I think the 14" and 18" over the calf are too high but they are ok for around the house. Then there is the question of insulation, safety toe, steel toe, etc. Some welder told me if you have a steel toe and a heavy weight its it, that it can cut your toe(s) off. The only boot I can think of that would give me support, waterproofing, and be resoleable, as well as offer puncture resistance is two pair of hiking boots -- one for winter and one for summer. But I am not sure how well they would work when doing auto motive work when oil or solvents get accidentally spilled on them, etc. Some guys advise against insulation, saying they choose how to insulate. And how do you size them if you would wear both thin socks and heavy socks at different times.

I was surprised to learn that guys who use chainsaws on a daily basis for a living, like loggers, almost all of them having these special chainsaw and/or loggers boots, maybe both. As I am writing this I don't recall if those kinds of boots are one and the same. As I recall they have this very high heel that has a curve to it. Anyway, I don't need them, I am not currently using a chainsaw and I am not a logger, and if I was to suddenly have a need for a chainsaw, I think a good pair of heavy duty hiking boots might work. I only offer this last paragraph as an illustration of how different types of boots can still be important.

What boot buying strategies do you guys use or what do you purchase?


thank you all in advance.
"When you have both a secret government and an open government -- you have a secret government."

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warmstrong1955
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Re: Q: Need some boot purchasing advice

Post by warmstrong1955 » Wed Dec 13, 2017 10:05 pm

Look at Matterhorns. We wore 'em in the mine.
Warerproof, oil-proof, mud-proof, hard toe....come in insulated, and non, and hold up better that any other work boot I have worn. Rough duty in a mine.....
They are spendy, but not if you figure by the mile.

Bill
Today's solutions are tomorrow's problems.

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diyer
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Re: Q: Need some boot purchasing advice

Post by diyer » Thu Dec 14, 2017 11:44 pm

warmstrong1955 wrote:Look at Matterhorns. We wore 'em in the mine.
Warerproof, oil-proof, mud-proof, hard toe....come in insulated, and non, and hold up better that any other work boot I have worn. Rough duty in a mine.....
They are spendy, but not if you figure by the mile.

Bill
Hello Bill, I assume Matterhorn is a USA Brand
"When you have both a secret government and an open government -- you have a secret government."

stevec
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Re: Q: Need some boot purchasing advice

Post by stevec » Fri Dec 15, 2017 7:26 am

Apparently they're made in the USA'

http://www.americanmadeworkboots.com/br ... rhorn.html

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warmstrong1955
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Re: Q: Need some boot purchasing advice

Post by warmstrong1955 » Fri Dec 15, 2017 7:52 am

Yup! Genuine made in USA.
How strange huh?
;)
Today's solutions are tomorrow's problems.

John Hasler
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Re: Q: Need some boot purchasing advice

Post by John Hasler » Fri Dec 15, 2017 8:14 am

warmstrong1955 wrote:Yup! Genuine made in USA.
How strange huh?
;)
Well, assembled in USA:
AMERICAN BUILT: ASSEMBLED WITH PRIDE IN PORTLAND, OREGON, USING THE FINEST MATERIALS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

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warmstrong1955
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Re: Q: Need some boot purchasing advice

Post by warmstrong1955 » Fri Dec 15, 2017 8:22 am

Ummmm Portland? ....no....Pennsylvania....

http://coveshoe.com/matterhorn.asp

Bill
Today's solutions are tomorrow's problems.

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SteveHGraham
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Re: Q: Need some boot purchasing advice

Post by SteveHGraham » Fri Dec 15, 2017 10:40 am

When I was a kid, I moved from Miami to New York for college. In early October, we got 6 inches of snow, and I assumed it was going to be like that all year. I went out and got my first down jacket, plus insulated boots and wool socks. People told me to buy Timberland boots. What a mistake. They were flimsy, and they rotted from sweat. One day the sole came off of one of the boots, and they were done. The next pair I bought (didn't learn) was also garbage. Timberlands are junk. Fine for rappers and muggers, but worthless for anyone who goes outdoors in bad weather.

When I started riding motorcycles, I bought a pair of Danner Acadia boots. That was in 2000. I still have them. I would say I've put two years' worth of wear on them; I haven't ridden all that much. Anyway, they're in fantastic shape. They're extremely comfortable. They don't rot or stink.

I also have a pair of Danner hunting boots, which are really just Acadias with a different sole.

I just moved to northern Florida, where a passing hurricane made it necessary for me to become an amateur lumberjack. I needed safety toes. I got some Danner Vicious boots. These are not US-made, sadly, but they seem every bit as good as the Acadias. The comfort is amazing. I literally hate to take them off at the end of the day. They're waterproof, they have plastic safety toes, they give perfect support...can't be beat.

The only complaint I have is that the outer toe cap is too low, so the leather tears when you kick things by accident. I bought a product called KG Boot Guard. It's like truck bed paint. You put two coats on the toe of a boot, and it keeps the leather from tearing when you run into tree limbs and so on.

I can't tell you how long the Vicious boots will last, but so far, they are fantastic.

I also bought some Keen Braddock boots, made in the US. They seem to be very tough. Steel toes, with better toe protection on the outside. But the insoles are hard compared to Danners, and you can't use aftermarket insoles with them.

I like the Danners so much, I bought them in two heights.

You can get US-made Danners. Just check when you buy.

The prices fluctuate on Amazon. The second pair of Danners was originally something like $150, but while they were sitting in my cart, they dropped temporarily to $97, so I clicked.

They run small, so go up a half-size.

https://www.amazon.com/Danner-Mens-Vici ... B00IQ3FO0O
Every hard-fried egg began life sunny-side up.

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SteveHGraham
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Re: Q: Need some boot purchasing advice

Post by SteveHGraham » Fri Dec 15, 2017 4:28 pm

Interesting (to me) side note: I bought my first Danners in Miami. They had insulated boots, but none without insulation. The salesman told me they had found that 200-g insulated boots actually worked better in the heat.

I always wear Wigwam wool socks. Warmer in winter, cooler in summer, and always dryer and more comfortable. And they last and last.
Every hard-fried egg began life sunny-side up.

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BadDog
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Re: Q: Need some boot purchasing advice

Post by BadDog » Fri Dec 15, 2017 5:06 pm

I've got Thorogood shoes I like a lot. Steel toes, great soles, leather, very comfortable, and made in the USA.
I'm wearing these at this very moment. Looks like they are currently out of stock on Amazon, but I paid just under $100 for these. Liked them so much I bought another pair to set on the shelf until I need them. That was about 3 years ago, and I wear these for most everything shop or yard related. My feet don't hurt, and for whatever reason (support and stability?) my knees hurt a lot less too. The steel toes have come in handy a few times too. They are a bit beat up from hard use, but show no signs of failing in any way. Also, my shop has epoxy floors that can be quite slick with water, and these soles have never slipped. I even got some non-steel toes versions for going out and about, but don't like them nearly as well. Same description and look on the site, but they are very different shoes when compared side by side, and not nearly as comfortable.
Russ
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GlennW
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Re: Q: Need some boot purchasing advice

Post by GlennW » Fri Dec 15, 2017 5:08 pm

My vote would be for Timberland Pro's.

Toughest boots I have ever worn, but also the heaviest! Lots of exercise just walking with them on.

The soles can be replaced as well, and the laces haven't given up yet.

I got tired of the soles coming loose and laces wearing out and breaking on every other boots I have ever worn.
Glenn

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steamin10
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Re: Q: Need some boot purchasing advice

Post by steamin10 » Sat Dec 16, 2017 12:13 am

I am no longer in the heavy work boot corner, and go round in joggers velcro most of the time. I have a set of water hardened lace up work boots in high ankle style. They sit in injured reserve waiting to be oiled again to rebreak them in. They sit along side of my slip on rubber boots for the animal yard. Basic concrete boots from the farm store. Cheep, but then I dont wear them all day. I slip out of them when the heavy work is done.

Good boots cost good money, but are a wise investment for fit and finish for you. Choose wisely. Unless I can fit them out on my feet, I would be wary of Amazon and any other best guess fit.
Big Dave, former Millwright, Electrician, Environmental conditioning, and back yard Fixxit guy. Now retired, persuing boats, trains, and broken relics.
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