Page 1 of 2

Installing Bearing on Dremel Shaft

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 6:18 pm
by SteveHGraham
I have an old Dremel 395 Type 5. It was acting funny, so I got a Proxxon. Today, by some fluke of fate, I managed to reattach a loose wire on the armature and get the tool working again.

Now that it runs, I notice that it goes "WHOOOOO!!!" when I turn it on. Either it's startled, or the front bearing is going.

Some guy on the web says he got into his bearing and managed to put grease in it. Another guy says it's too hard to put a new bearing on.

I found out which bearing to get (626Z), and it's like five bucks, so I thought I might give it a shot. The bearing is on a 6mm shaft. A little bit of the top of the shaft is visible above the bearing. I figure I can rest the bearing on something and bonk the shaft out of it.

Wondering if anyone has a good suggestion for getting the new bearing ON. This part is not something which is easy to mount in a press. I was thinking I might get a little tube that would slip over the shaft and rest on the bearing, allowing me to bang it on with a hammer.

This job is not important at all. I just want to thumb my nose at Dremel for selling me a tool that wore out.

Re: Installing Bearing on Dremel Shaft

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 6:53 pm
by SteveHGraham
Well, I got it wrong. It's the REAR bearing. The front bearing feels crunchy, too, however, and it has a fat sleeve on the shaft between the bearing and the end, so I have no idea how to get that off.

I opened the tool up and dribbled air tool oil on the bearings. Much quieter now, but I don't think the bearings magically fixed themselves.

Re: Installing Bearing on Dremel Shaft

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 7:09 pm
by warmstrong1955
Seems to me, you could use a bearing spliter, or contrive one on your own, and tap the end of the shaft with a dead blow, or plastic hammer and drive it out of the bearing.
I've done a lot of air tools that way. I use a 5 gallon bucket full of rags to catch the shaft.
You can use a press too, but on small tools, it's easier to use a non-marring hammer.

Bill

Re: Installing Bearing on Dremel Shaft

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 7:30 pm
by SteveHGraham
I knew I needed a reason to buy a brass hammer.

I can't figure out how to get the front bearing off. The steel sleeve between it and the end of the shaft appears to be on there for good.

There are model 395 Dremels that have three bearings. They have flexible couplings between the front two bearings. If I had one of those, I could remove the coupling to get access to the shaft. I don't see a coupling on mine.

It looks like I bought the crappiest Dremel ever made! Maybe I should just use it until it blows up and then spend $16 on a Chinese replacement.

Re: Installing Bearing on Dremel Shaft

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 7:39 pm
by warmstrong1955
Horror Freight sells 'e. for $6.99! ;)

I have a 395. Only 2 bearings, per the parts list. On the front, I'm guessing that the front shaft presses into the armature shaft. Not like there's much torque there. Not sure what the cross drilled hole I see in the pic is though. Might be a matter of making the right little splitter & puller?

They show the bearings, but they are part of the 'armature assembly'.
Kinda like my MTD tractor. They don't sell mower deck bearings, only the whole shaft & bearing assemblies. In a word.....dumb.

Re: Installing Bearing on Dremel Shaft

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 7:41 pm
by warmstrong1955
Forgot to add...on the cross drilled hole, not sure what it's for, besides the spindle lock.

Re: Installing Bearing on Dremel Shaft

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 7:46 pm
by warmstrong1955
http://www.repairtoolparts.com/bosch-pa ... embly-120v

In case you wreck something.....it ain't all lost....

;)

Re: Installing Bearing on Dremel Shaft

Posted: Sat Jun 16, 2018 1:49 am
by Harold_V
SteveHGraham wrote:
Fri Jun 15, 2018 7:30 pm
I knew I needed a reason to buy a brass hammer.
Unless you're hoping for a sparkles hammer, there's no real reason for one made of brass. They are very capable of denting steel. Been there, done that. If you must have a metal hammer, buy one made of lead, and get (or make) the necessary mold so you can recast the head when it's deformed badly.

Brass work hardens very quickly. Unless you are prepared to endlessly anneal the brass hammer you hope to acquire, I'd highly recommend you investigate the Nupla Flex line. In my opinion, they are the best possible hammer to own, with a myriad of tip types available.

H

Re: Installing Bearing on Dremel Shaft

Posted: Sat Jun 16, 2018 9:49 am
by SteveHGraham
Not Lixey? Is there a schism among the machining poobahs?

Re: Installing Bearing on Dremel Shaft

Posted: Sat Jun 16, 2018 10:11 am
by warmstrong1955
I have a Proto, and various different tips to fit it.

Hope I’m not excommunicated for not having a ‘designer brand’.

;)

Re: Installing Bearing on Dremel Shaft

Posted: Sat Jun 16, 2018 3:00 pm
by John Hasler
Harold_V wrote:
Sat Jun 16, 2018 1:49 am
SteveHGraham wrote:
Fri Jun 15, 2018 7:30 pm
I knew I needed a reason to buy a brass hammer.
Unless you're hoping for a sparkles hammer, there's no real reason for one made of brass. They are very capable of denting steel. Been there, done that. If you must have a metal hammer, buy one made of lead, and get (or make) the necessary mold so you can recast the head when it's deformed badly.
I have a hammer with a cast-iron body, one lead face, and one wooden face. I recast the lead face in place.

Re: Installing Bearing on Dremel Shaft

Posted: Sat Jun 16, 2018 3:45 pm
by Harold_V
SteveHGraham wrote:
Sat Jun 16, 2018 9:49 am
Not Lixey? Is there a schism among the machining poobahs?
I was introduced to the Nupla hammers when I entered training, way back in '57. Shortly thereafter I made one---a 1½" diameter body, brass, and a wooden handle, which has been replaced one time. I still use that hammer to this day. I recommend Nupla because they have served me exceedingly well, and their hammer tips enjoy a very long life. That said, I'm sure others might have an equal story, based on hammers made by others.

What readers should take away from this conversation is the FACT that brass hammers should NOT be confused with non-marring hammers. If a brass hammer is used on delicate (or soft) objects, they will be damaged. Brass hammers are NOT soft hammers.

H