Glue for Plastic in Gasoline Tank

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SteveHGraham
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Glue for Plastic in Gasoline Tank

Post by SteveHGraham » Mon Jul 30, 2018 5:31 pm

Today I took my EZ GO out in the rain to get the mail. It was perfectly willing to take me to my gate, but then it decided to rest.

I took out the fuel siphon tube and blew through it to get crap out, and the cart got me back to the house.

The siphon tube goes into a little plastic elbow, and at this point, it's mainly held in by friction. I decided to get a new one. Then I found out they cost $28+.

What's a good glue to hold two pieces of plastic together in a tank full of gasoline?
Every hard-fried egg began life sunny-side up.

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SteveHGraham
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Re: Glue for Plastic in Gasoline Tank

Post by SteveHGraham » Mon Jul 30, 2018 5:33 pm

I suppose it will also have to resist ethanol.
Every hard-fried egg began life sunny-side up.

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BigDumbDinosaur
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Re: Glue for Plastic in Gasoline Tank

Post by BigDumbDinosaur » Mon Jul 30, 2018 8:17 pm

SteveHGraham wrote:
Mon Jul 30, 2018 5:31 pm
What's a good glue to hold two pieces of plastic together in a tank full of gasoline?
Five minute epoxy resists gasoline. I can't vouch for resistance to ethanol, though.
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mcostello
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Re: Glue for Plastic in Gasoline Tank

Post by mcostello » Mon Jul 30, 2018 9:10 pm

I was told (never checked) Seal All would work.

mikeehlert
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Re: Glue for Plastic in Gasoline Tank

Post by mikeehlert » Tue Jul 31, 2018 8:54 am

can you heat weld it? Soldering iron?

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SteveHGraham
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Re: Glue for Plastic in Gasoline Tank

Post by SteveHGraham » Tue Jul 31, 2018 9:56 am

I will fool around with it and see which idea works. Thanks.

Not anxious to be marooned in my own yard again.
Every hard-fried egg began life sunny-side up.

RMinMN
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Re: Glue for Plastic in Gasoline Tank

Post by RMinMN » Wed Aug 01, 2018 6:04 am

Buy one that is metal or make it yourself. Problem permanently solved. I've not have much luck repairing the plastics that contact fuel and even if it works it is still a weak plastic fitting.

John Hasler
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Re: Glue for Plastic in Gasoline Tank

Post by John Hasler » Wed Aug 01, 2018 7:46 am

A heat gun works for welding plastic but temperature control is tricky and you need a small pencil jet of hot air. JB Weld resists gasoline but does not bond to plastics. Most plastics glues rely on solvent welding, but, gasoline being a pretty good organic solvent, the plastics used for it tend to be resistant to most solvents

I agree with RMinMN. Make a metal replacement for the entire assembly. Can you add a pickup screen to keep the crap out?

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liveaboard
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Re: Glue for Plastic in Gasoline Tank

Post by liveaboard » Thu Aug 02, 2018 3:50 am

I have several noname Chinese garden machines; a hedgetrimmer, pole hedge trimmer, and a strimmer.
All of them work great except for 1 problem; the fuel lines, and the grommet where they enter the tank.

Isn't this why we have machine shops at home?

They all have different sized entry holes in the tanks, and each required a different solution, but after an hour or two, a bit of metal and some real fuel line, they're all back at work.

Now that the gasoline is all being used by the motor instead of dribbling down my back, I can get through all the strimming on a single tank.

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BadDog
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Re: Glue for Plastic in Gasoline Tank

Post by BadDog » Thu Aug 02, 2018 12:03 pm

I had a similar experience, and good lines (Mc Master) fixed most of it. My single remaining frustration is the primer bulbs that die each season without fail. And there appear to be none available that don't. I bought a pack of 10, but they don't fit quite right and leak.
Russ
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SteveHGraham
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Re: Glue for Plastic in Gasoline Tank

Post by SteveHGraham » Thu Aug 02, 2018 1:09 pm

I ordered some real hose clamps. I hate those stupid clamps that go on and off with pliers. The golf cart probably cost $6000 new, and they saved $3.00 with those terrible clamps.

My theory is that a clamp that won't tighten enough is letting air in. That's in addition to the crap in the tank. I saw air in the gas filter.
Every hard-fried egg began life sunny-side up.

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BadDog
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Re: Glue for Plastic in Gasoline Tank

Post by BadDog » Thu Aug 02, 2018 2:11 pm

Actually, with a proper fitting and pliable hose, the spring clamps are generally considered superior for sealing. Worm clamps are (often over) tightened and rigid once installed, but the hose will gradually give way below it, particularly if there is flex and vibration. You can often clearly see this when removing a clamp from a hose. As the hose gives way, the sealing pressure goes away, and leaks start. It's not a rapid process, but is notable. The spring clamps are worthless if your hose has gotten hard, or if the nipple is a bit undersize. But applied to a good proper fitted hose, the clamp holds firm pressure to establish the seal and lock/restrain the hose on the nipple, and continues to exert pressure as the rubber gradually gives way. And by not starting over tight, the deformation of the hose itself (and often resulting cracks) over the lifetime is also reduced. At least that's the general idea. However, I hate those spring clamp bastages so much I replace them with worms for any common service applications.
Russ
Master Floor Sweeper

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