Chainsaw Sharpening: Files v. Gadgets

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mcostello
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Re: Chainsaw Sharpening: Files v. Gadgets

Post by mcostello » Fri Jun 28, 2019 8:09 pm

As a hint, When Your saw does not cut square and everything You have done does not help, just take Your trusty square and place it along the side of the bar and see if the grooves are not worn unevenly. How to fix? CAUTION- machinist related- just put them on Your belt sander table that has been checked for square and true it up. Not that I am a perfectionist, but I held mine up to a Vee block and used a surface grinder to touch it up. Have several friends say The bar cannot be trued up while ignoring the fact I have used it for several years.

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Re: Chainsaw Sharpening: Files v. Gadgets

Post by Harold_V » Sat Jun 29, 2019 1:28 am

SteveHGraham wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 8:02 pm
I am inclined to think it doesn't matter which way one pushes a chainsaw file, since the metal can't tell.
Actually, it does. When you file, you generate a bur. If the bur is created at the cutting edge, when you put the saw to work, the bur folds over and does damage to the edge. If you file away from the edge (file towards the saw), the bur is created at the rear, and is much smaller due to the angle of the cutting edge. With a sharp file, little, if any, bur is created at the cutting edge when filed this way.

H
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SteveHGraham
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Re: Chainsaw Sharpening: Files v. Gadgets

Post by SteveHGraham » Sat Jun 29, 2019 9:52 am

I don't really worry about that, since whatever burr you leave on a chainsaw will probably disintegrate as soon as you plow into an oak tree.

It seemed to me that filing toward the saw, as you suggest, would actually be better, but it didn't seem to me to matter in any practical sense.

In any event, the pros are teaching people to make burrs.
Every hard-fried egg began life sunny-side up.

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Re: Chainsaw Sharpening: Files v. Gadgets

Post by Harold_V » Sat Jun 29, 2019 3:57 pm

Manual cutter grinders tend to grind cutters the wrong way (when using a finger), and there's not a question about the resulting bur being an issue. Yes, it gets removed when the saw is put in service, but not without a little damage to the cutting edge, and that was my point. You are better served to avoid the problem, as the longer you keep a keen edge, the longer will be the service life of a cutter of any kind (except for negative rake carbide).

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

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SteveHGraham
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Re: Chainsaw Sharpening: Files v. Gadgets

Post by SteveHGraham » Sat Jun 29, 2019 7:48 pm

The amusing thing is that I was doing it right, based on general knowledge and common sense, while the Youtube pros were doing it wrong. Sometimes even a small amount of metalworking knowledge can be helpful in other pursuits. Sometimes it can start arguments, now that I think about it. "No, you're not supposed to run the drill as fast as it can go!"
Every hard-fried egg began life sunny-side up.

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BadDog
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Re: Chainsaw Sharpening: Files v. Gadgets

Post by BadDog » Sun Jun 30, 2019 1:50 am

SteveHGraham wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 8:02 pm
I am inclined to think it doesn't matter which way one pushes a chainsaw file, since the metal can't tell. I do plan to observe the height of my rakers from now on.
On all other points, agreed. But if this was directed at my response, I don't think you understood. As it turns out, unless you work under the bar in an uncomfortable manner, then the file direction (on top of the bar) from front side toward motor exiting out the other side is the only direction that makes sense. But I said nothing about direction, only where the tooth is sharpened. The way I described runs a round straight file under the main cutting edge of the tooth, and thus does not change the geometry of the tooth at all. And thus doesn't affect the rakers in any way from factory spec. Since there is some relief, I suppose the edge moving back eventually drops closer to the raker, but I've sharpened chains in this manner until over halft the tooth (length) was gone and never had any issue to note with the raker height.

And, as I stated, I've personally sharpened chain saws with files since I was a kid. There is a very small learning curve to being able to maintain a chain in free cutting form. A bit more to fix a fouled chain (as long as not borderline ruined), but with an eye to how the teeth work, and patience to spend a bit more time (still not much) on damaged teeth, that's easily doable too. If pre-teen me can manage, it shouldn't be a problem for any adult with enough mental acuity to even contemplate a machining hobby.

Again, using a file to touch up a chain is *fast* and easy with only a few dollars invested in a file. If you feel really physically challenged, they make guides to help set and keep proper orientation. But unless you need one of those overpriced knife sharpening guides with clamps and angled wires and what not, then you should be fine. And it's completely awkward to file it the "wrong" way, so not an issue either. As to what guys do who do it for gain, or what cheap "sorta works" sharpeners do, or which direction they spin the wheel on the grinding gizmo, I have no idea. It would never cross my mind to start down any of those paths. Now, my big 12" circular saws with a bajillion carbide teeth is a different matter entirely, but not a chainsaw. That's like a scalpel to felling axe...
Russ
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Re: Chainsaw Sharpening: Files v. Gadgets

Post by spro » Sun Jun 30, 2019 2:09 am

Great info but lets get back to the "bar" for a minute. Bars become twisted and bent during use. A straight edge and vise with wood jaws help in bending them square again. The small track in the center is key alignment for the blade. If not straight, it is rubbing somewhere that it should float across.

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SteveHGraham
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Re: Chainsaw Sharpening: Files v. Gadgets

Post by SteveHGraham » Sun Jun 30, 2019 8:43 am

I don't have any problems at all with files. I find filing to be very quick and easy, and I don't understand why people put their bars in clamps.

I was suspicious because it was so easy.
Every hard-fried egg began life sunny-side up.

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mcostello
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Re: Chainsaw Sharpening: Files v. Gadgets

Post by mcostello » Sun Jun 30, 2019 7:26 pm

Just to clarify, I was not talking about a bent blade, just a bar that wears unevenly across the top.

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tornitore45
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Re: Chainsaw Sharpening: Files v. Gadgets

Post by tornitore45 » Mon Jul 01, 2019 8:51 am

Gadgets?
Some people (my wife) have an olive fork, a pickle fork, an olive pitter, a melon baller, a garlic press, a grapefruit spoon, a shrimp de-veiner, an egg slicer, an apple corer and two dozen more, mostly unused, in the kitchen drawer for the only purpose to keep you from reaching a paring knife. Not to mention the Cuisinart that by the time one use and cleans it a chef knife does the job in 1/2 the time.
To balance all that the $800 knife set is duller than a lawn mower blade.
Mauro Gaetano
in Austin TX

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SteveHGraham
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Re: Chainsaw Sharpening: Files v. Gadgets

Post by SteveHGraham » Mon Jul 01, 2019 10:10 am

A Cuisinart is wonderful for kneading bread. Takes one minute.
Every hard-fried egg began life sunny-side up.

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BadDog
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Re: Chainsaw Sharpening: Files v. Gadgets

Post by BadDog » Mon Jul 01, 2019 10:18 am

I think our wives may be related, closely...
Russ
Master Floor Sweeper

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