One man's insanity---the story of an induction furnace

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rrnut-2
Posts: 387
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2011 7:40 pm
Location: New Hampshire

Re: One man's insanity---the story of an induction furnace

Post by rrnut-2 » Tue Feb 06, 2018 5:40 pm

We used phenolic for the insulators. Most of our furnace parts were made of aluminum, but parts still get hot.
I gave Liz a hung for you. Give Susan our best.

We are hoping to make Train Mountain this year, but see my PM

Jim B

rrnut-2
Posts: 387
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2011 7:40 pm
Location: New Hampshire

Re: One man's insanity---the story of an induction furnace

Post by rrnut-2 » Tue Feb 06, 2018 5:58 pm

Just watched your video...WOW...that brings back memorys. Looking good!

Jim B

John Hasler
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Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2016 4:05 pm
Location: Elmwood, Wisconsin

Re: One man's insanity---the story of an induction furnace

Post by John Hasler » Tue Feb 06, 2018 10:48 pm

Asbestos is just about ideal for this application. It's quite safe to machine it as long as you keep it wet.

Treasure your asbestos supply. There will never be any more.

Harold_V
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Joined: Fri Dec 20, 2002 11:02 pm
Location: Onalaska, WA USA

Re: One man's insanity---the story of an induction furnace

Post by Harold_V » Wed Feb 07, 2018 2:35 am

John Hasler wrote:
Tue Feb 06, 2018 10:48 pm
Asbestos is just about ideal for this application. It's quite safe to machine it as long as you keep it wet.

Treasure your asbestos supply. There will never be any more.
I was gifted a large stack of one type, light brown in color, many, many years ago, while it was still available. I put some of it to good use in building the custom filtered fume hood I needed when I was actively refining gold and other precious metals. I still have a large supply, which is in 1¼" thick sheet, about 18" wide and 8' long. I also have a small amount of what was known as Colorlith, and some Transite. I have no clue what the thick stuff was called, but it appears to be bonded with some type of plastic. The remnants I received were leftovers from making countertops. This all occurred right when action was being taken against the use of asbestos, and it was still available, although already tainted by its reputation.

I wear a good respirator when I machine this stuff, and run a vacuum cleaner (built in, twin motors) that discharges fine particulate matter out of doors. The vacuum cleaner has a cyclonic separator, with no filter to clog. As we live in a remote area, on 5½ acres, I feel reasonably safe in doing so.

On the subject of machining wet. I had to make some spacers for the coil (a long story which I will detail in the near future). The piece of Transite I used was outside in the rain. I found it machined wonderfully while wet, which I had never tried before.

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

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neanderman
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio, USA

Re: One man's insanity---the story of an induction furnace

Post by neanderman » Wed Feb 14, 2018 1:56 am

I am humbled in your collective presence.
Ed

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