Amazing machine work

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GlennW
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Amazing machine work

Post by GlennW » Fri May 10, 2019 7:46 am

Occasionally I see where someone comments on how machine work was somehow lacking back in the 1930's and 40's or that tolerances were loose since it was difficult to maintain any real accuracy.

These are some (yes, just some) of the internal parts from the engines that I work on that were designed and mass produced during that time period.

Every day I marvel at the design, workmanship, finish, and accuracy of the parts. Some of the parts are called out to five decimal place tolerances.

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Glenn

Operating machines is perfectly safe......until you forget how dangerous it really is!

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NP317
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Re: Amazing machine work

Post by NP317 » Fri May 10, 2019 10:13 am

High Art!
~RN

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SteveHGraham
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Re: Amazing machine work

Post by SteveHGraham » Fri May 10, 2019 11:38 am

Hard to be sure without my reading glasses, but I would say that one at the bottom was only called out to 4 decimal places.

Youtube has a lot of neat videos of old-time machining. I can see why we use CNC now. All the other clever ideas were used up decades ago.
Every hard-fried egg began life sunny-side up.

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Bill Shields
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Re: Amazing machine work

Post by Bill Shields » Fri May 10, 2019 7:16 pm

the trick is to get it all back together....
Too many things going on to bother listing them.

Harold_V
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Re: Amazing machine work

Post by Harold_V » Sat May 11, 2019 2:03 am

Nice, Glenn!
I'm not the least bit surprised that high quality was possible "back in the day". It's very much a part of the current argument about who (or what) qualifies as a "machinist".

I spent the first 7½ years of my career working for the missile industry. There was not so much as one NC or CNC machine in the shop, and work with tenths tolerance was routine. We were successful because we were trained to work properly. The only machine we had that was more than a manual machine was a two head Gorton I-22 tracer, which sill relied upon the operator for proper results.

While I respect the skills of those who operate CNC's, the real test of being a machinist is when you can be handed a print, pointed to a machine, where you would find the necessary material, and be able to make the setup, create the parts, per print, in a timely fashion, all without supervision. That applies to not only manual machines, but CNC machines as well.

Can't do the setup? A machinist can. Why would you even think of calling yourself a machinist if you can't? It's highly insulting to those who have paid their dues and can.

Best way to look at this is to ask yourself how you'd feel if the guy off the street claimed he could do your job when he has little or no experience.
Machinists see that frequently.

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

Russ Hanscom
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Re: Amazing machine work

Post by Russ Hanscom » Sat May 11, 2019 9:54 pm

Those look suspiciously like Allison parts! Used to have one of those in my garage - just because.

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SteveHGraham
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Re: Amazing machine work

Post by SteveHGraham » Sun May 12, 2019 8:05 am

Harold_V wrote:
Sat May 11, 2019 2:03 am
Best way to look at this is to ask yourself how you'd feel if the guy off the street claimed he could do your job when he has little or no experience.
Machinists see that frequently.

H
Harold, I can't say I share your attitude toward CNC machinists. I met one yesterday, and he did excellent work for me at a very low price, while I waited. I was so impressed, I took his picture.
05 11 19 CNC key machine at Lowes small.jpg
Every hard-fried egg began life sunny-side up.

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GlennW
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Re: Amazing machine work

Post by GlennW » Sun May 12, 2019 12:19 pm

Russ Hanscom wrote:
Sat May 11, 2019 9:54 pm
Those look suspiciously like Allison parts!
Packard Merlin.
Glenn

Operating machines is perfectly safe......until you forget how dangerous it really is!

Russ Hanscom
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Re: Amazing machine work

Post by Russ Hanscom » Sun May 12, 2019 4:26 pm

Almost twins; but the brits had the edge.

Harold_V
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Re: Amazing machine work

Post by Harold_V » Mon May 13, 2019 3:58 am

SteveHGraham wrote:
Sun May 12, 2019 8:05 am
Harold, I can't say I share your attitude toward CNC machinists. I met one yesterday, and he did excellent work for me at a very low price, while I waited.
Yeah, but can it mambo?

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

Russ Hanscom
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Re: Amazing machine work

Post by Russ Hanscom » Mon May 13, 2019 8:17 am

Possibly getting off topic, but after the war, the V-12 aircraft engines were used for industrial purposes. Hollywood studios use them to drive generators for arc lights for night time filming and the oil industry used them to drive large high pressure portable pumps. There was an outfit in Long Beach that had warehouses full of complete engines and parts. When an engine had a problem it was not repaired, just replaced as they were dirt cheap; I bought mine for about $400 in the late 60s, like new condition, probably replaced by a later model during the war.
If you want an earth shaking experience, try a frac job with 6-8 of the pump trucks running the engines at full throttle and open exhausts. Even with hearing protection and a bit of distance your head was throbbing.

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GlennW
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Re: Amazing machine work

Post by GlennW » Mon May 13, 2019 9:02 am

I was helping a guy a while back that was a test lab for hurricane windows and shutters. Re was using a Pratt R-2800 to generate the wind for testing.
Glenn

Operating machines is perfectly safe......until you forget how dangerous it really is!

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