Why 0.5-Liter Cylinders Will Soon Dominate Automotive-Engine

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ken572
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Why 0.5-Liter Cylinders Will Soon Dominate Automotive-Engine

Postby ken572 » Tue Jan 27, 2015 6:25 pm

(ALL) :D

Why 0.5-Liter Cylinders Will Soon Dominate Automotive-Engine Design

http://blog.caranddriver.com/why-0-5-li ... ne-design/

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Re: Why 0.5-Liter Cylinders Will Soon Dominate Automotive-En

Postby GabeP » Tue Jan 27, 2015 6:45 pm

I do not know. But the smaller engines nowadays have great fuel economy due to electronic aids, but still produce ample power. They also might be somewhat cheaper to build. I also disgusts me that the engines are all made of aluminum blocks and heads. Honestly I have never heard anything about the .5 liter cylinders having an effect on the automotive industry.
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Re: Why 0.5-Liter Cylinders Will Soon Dominate Automotive-En

Postby JackF » Wed Jan 28, 2015 11:26 am

Thanks fore that link Ken, I've always been a fan of under square engines. :wink: :D

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Re: Why 0.5-Liter Cylinders Will Soon Dominate Automotive-En

Postby ctwo » Wed Jan 28, 2015 3:10 pm

wish I had something to say about it.

I read some of the comments and one seemed to indicate logic - engines are purpose designed. With that in mind, I don't see how a standardized cylinder configuration can accommodate both ends of the scale (such as a tow vehicle and light-weight economy commuter).

I can, however, understand the economy from a manufacturing POV, but cost does not always seem to be the dominating marketing metric.

I guess I had to say something?
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Re: Why 0.5-Liter Cylinders Will Soon Dominate Automotive-En

Postby JackF » Thu Jan 29, 2015 11:09 am

I may be over simplifying this but I understood the study to conclude that there is an ideal cylinder to stroke configuration for the best fuel combustion, there for, the best efficiency. The different power needs required for different vehicles would be met by adding or subtracting the number of cylinders. I don't know however if the study went into different engine configurations; inline, 90º Vs, 60ºVs, 45ºVs, Radial, 180 opposed and so on. :? :)

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Re: Why 0.5-Liter Cylinders Will Soon Dominate Automotive-En

Postby redneckalbertan » Thu Jan 29, 2015 2:32 pm

There was also something in the article about the relationship of surface area of the cylinder to volume.

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Re: Why 0.5-Liter Cylinders Will Soon Dominate Automotive-Engine

Postby Magicniner » Mon Dec 26, 2016 8:11 am

ken572 wrote:(ALL) :D

Why 0.5-Liter Cylinders Will Soon Dominate Automotive-Engine Design


Looking at how common engines are (in applications with good power with reasonable service intervals) which are close to ~2 litre straight 4, ~3 litre V6 and ~4 litre V8 I don't think this is news.

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Re: Why 0.5-Liter Cylinders Will Soon Dominate Automotive-Engine

Postby NP317 » Mon Dec 26, 2016 10:42 am

Magicniner wrote:
ken572 wrote:(ALL) :D

Why 0.5-Liter Cylinders Will Soon Dominate Automotive-Engine Design


Looking at how common engines are (in applications with good power with reasonable service intervals) which are close to ~2 litre straight 4, ~3 litre V6 and ~4 litre V8 I don't think this is news.

My thought, too.
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Re: Why 0.5-Liter Cylinders Will Soon Dominate Automotive-En

Postby neanderman » Tue Dec 27, 2016 11:53 pm

GabeP wrote:It also disgusts me that the engines are all made of aluminum blocks and heads.


Why? Just curious. It's obviously driven by reducing weight. I know that, early on, there were cooling issues due to corrosion, but I think new anti-freeze additives have licked that, and a lot of these designs use steel liners.
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Re: Why 0.5-Liter Cylinders Will Soon Dominate Automotive-En

Postby BigDumbDinosaur » Wed Dec 28, 2016 9:11 pm

GabeP wrote:I also disgusts me that the engines are all made of aluminum blocks and heads.

Not sure I understand your disgust.

Long, long ago, the aircraft industry demonstrated that aluminum was an eminently practical material for building engines that must be very dependable. Although most aero reciprocating engines were (and still are) air cooled, liquid cooled designs played a prominent role during World War II, most notably the Rolls-Royce V12 that powered the Supermarine Spitfire and the North American P51 Mustang. These planes were noted for their performance and reliability in combat.

Up until turbines took over, large aircraft were almost all powered by radial engines, in which as much aluminum as possible was used to make major components, such as the crankcase, cylinders and heads. Pratt and Whitney, in particular, developed the air-cooled radial into the most reliable reciprocating aero engine ever devised. Their R2800 powerplant was legendary for performance and dependability, causing many a pilot while flying through bad weather to remind himself to "Place your trust in God and Pratt and Whitney."

In my lifetime, the only production aluminum block automotive engine that ever had significant problems was the four-banger used in the Chevrolet Vega. Unlike most engines, the Vega engine's block didn't have a cylinder head deck, which put the onus on the cylinder head to add rigidity to the top end of the block. It sounded good in theory, and the foundry costs were lower due to simpler cores. In practice, GM ate a lot of engine replacements under warranty due to collant getting into the cylinders while the engine was running. In contrast, the Corvair's opposed-six engine, which was entirely aluminum and preceded the Vega by over a decade, was far less trouble-prone if properly maintained.

About ten years ago, I traded in a 1994 Thunderbird that was powered by Ford's "modular" OHC V-8, which is all aluminum. The car had nearly 200,000 miles on it when I disposed of it and the engine had never received anything more than regular oil changes, occasional spark plug changes and a fresh set of injectors at about 140,000 miles.
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Re: Why 0.5-Liter Cylinders Will Soon Dominate Automotive-Engine

Postby neanderman » Wed Dec 28, 2016 11:32 pm

My family had a 1963 Oldsmobile Cutless, which had an aluminum block engine. It was notorious for overheating, something I later learned was due to corrosion due to anti-freeze, possibly because it wasn't changed often enough.

Subsequent auto's that I've owned with aluminum blocks have been fine.
Ed

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Re: Why 0.5-Liter Cylinders Will Soon Dominate Automotive-Engine

Postby spro » Thu Jan 05, 2017 6:47 pm

How do I not post, yet say I appreciate the information? In our case it is to let the statements stand for awhile and if there is incorrect advise, it will be challenged or corrected. Ah , I'm no engine builder but seen what Ed described by owning certain vehicles a long time. Aluminum and iron are not really compatible but an aluminum head is secured by steel bolts to an iron block. (Sort of thinking Toyota 22R now). When the coolant breaks down electrolysis goes up. The aluminum head is foreign agent and the gasket between cannot seal what is happening. I've seen this because I've bought vehicles which sat a long time. Blowing a head gasket is one thing but having one slowly erode is another. The head erodes, not the gasket and when the coolant ports erode and dump into combustion.. it is one heck of a drive with the engine temp needle buried into high zone, heater core on full blast, outside temperature 95+ and there it is. Everything lets loose and stops along the way to refill with water.
I wrote it off as destroyed but that same engine runs well today with a new head.


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