Sportster rebuild.

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Patio
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Location: Centralia Wa

Re: Sportster rebuild.

Post by Patio » Tue Sep 09, 2014 11:44 pm

It seems I have convoluted my threads. So I will try to catch things back up here.

In my projects thread I posted about making the missing bracket, which came out great, but I found the original as I was putting things back together, so I did not need it after all. :oops:

The primary side got put back together with out much trouble.

This is a picture of the setup to compress the clutch spring to get the nuts on that hold the plates together.
The spring is behind the plate in the center of the clutch basket.
20140808_201234a.jpg

In this picture all the brackets are install in their proper configuration, the primary chain and the chain tension roller, are installed.
20140812_130859a.jpg
Continued in the next post!

I am leaving the primary cover off for the moment, there may be a problem with the kicker sprocket. I have to do more test to find out.

The chain tensioner set up in a stock bike is a nylon type of shoe that the chain slide over. This one is a double bearing roller set up. I have no idea how well it will work. It was sold by a performance company, years ago.
20140812_130915a.jpg
Then I put the cylinders on over the pistons.
20140821_203311a.jpg
Then the heads and rocker boxes.
20140828_200610a.jpg
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Prepare for tomorrow!
Forgive the past!

Patio
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Joined: Wed Oct 06, 2010 3:14 pm
Location: Centralia Wa

Re: Sportster rebuild.

Post by Patio » Wed Sep 10, 2014 12:06 am

More pictures for your enjoyment. :)

Here I have the lifter blocks, push rods and their covers installed. I also have the ignition advance weights, points plate and points installed. I am going to get new points and a condenser, when she is ready to fire up.
20140909_213611a.jpg
The rear head has a small problem with the intake spigot. It has a chip missing out of the lip. I don't know how much trouble, if any this is going to cause me. The lip is for an O-ring seal type of set up. Another way is using a band set up, which is what I usually use. It has a flat rubber band that connect the manifold to the spigot. I may try some JB weld if it becomes a problem. Or if anyone has a good idea of an easy fix for this, I would be interested in hearing you thoughts. I am not interested in having it welded or brazed at this moment.
Here is a picture of the chip.
20140909_214009a.jpg
Today I got a chance to go to the, local independent, bike shop and look at a stock version of this bike, so I could figure out the battery and oil bag mounting. Now I am on the hunt for those parts. I am also am working on what I need for the breaks system. Some parts I have, some I have to figure out if they are any good and others I will need to find. It is starting to look like a motorcycle now.

Well that catches things up to where I am today.

More to come.

I will have to deal with the back drum break set up
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Patio
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Re: Sportster rebuild.

Post by Patio » Tue Sep 16, 2014 11:59 pm

Life works in funny ways sometimes. I am now more motivated then ever to get my two Sportsters back together. I need to sell them both, because I just bought this beauty.
1962 Harley Davidson, Panhead.
20140916_192437a.jpg
I do not have room to keep them all, so the others must go, but not until they are back up and running. I hope sometime before spring.
More to come.
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seal killer
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Re: Sportster rebuild.

Post by seal killer » Wed Sep 17, 2014 6:46 am

Patio--

Wow! That's nice!

--Bill
You are what you write.

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steamin10
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Re: Sportster rebuild.

Post by steamin10 » Sat Sep 20, 2014 7:24 pm

Pat, a work around for the snout chip is to machine an outside lipped sleeve, and make it so it just goes past the damage to wall it off. A band ring on the outside to keep it from moving in, and a chill fit, should get you home. Keep the ring as thin as possible, in keeping with airflow, tapers and as fancy as you please.

I dont trust junk like JB in this kind of problem, as it may crack or shed pieces to be swallowed by the engine.

PS. the new Baby looks colorful from here. I like antiquers.
Big Dave, former Millwright, Electrician, Environmental conditioning, and back yard Fixxit guy. Now retired, persuing boats, trains, and broken relics.
We have enough youth, how about a fountain of Smart. My computer beat me at chess, but not kickboxing
It is not getting caught in the rain, its learning to dance in it. People saying good morning, should have to prove it.

Patio
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Re: Sportster rebuild.

Post by Patio » Sun Sep 21, 2014 12:06 am

Thanks Bill
Dave, I think I am going to leave it as is for now. I am going to use the rubberband style seals, which will seat on the outside diameter of the spigot. The thought of material going into the intake was my biggest concern too.

I like old things too. :)
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Patio
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Re: Sportster rebuild.

Post by Patio » Mon Oct 13, 2014 12:15 am

Lost of stuff getting done, but not much to look at yet.
I have the intake mounted.
The oil bag and battery box, some of the mounts for these have been mocked up.
I am still in need of a back fender.

At this point I think I have most of the major parts, so I figured I need to make sure it will roll. I pulled the break caliper,and wheel off the bike. The caliper I can not get apart as the bolts are frozen. I pulled the wheel bearings and found rust on the races and the bearings were pitted. I have ordered new bearings, races, and seals. The front brake rotor, mounting screws were frozen and stripped out, so I had to drill the heads off of two of them. The screws are a hard material, so I had to sharpen my drill a couple of times, but it got done. The screws had counter sunk heads, so I drill until I thought I was close to cutting through, then I would give it a rap with a hammer the the heads would break off of the screw. :) That left me with a little nub sticking up. I mounted the wheel to the mill table, using a small end mill I shaved the nub off the drill down just a little bit into the screw. This made it so I could use a punch and roll the edges over to the center, leaving me a surface to indicate the hole on.

Here are some pictures for you viewing pleasure.
20141009_200417a.jpg
20141009_200437a.jpg
20141009_201856a.jpg
I ran a tap through all the holes, when I was done, to make sure everything is cleaned out.

The rotor is in bad shape but has some meat on it, so I am going to face it off and see if I can leave enough to make it pass it's minimum thickness allowed. It is an eleven inch rotor, so I can not turn it in my lathe, but I have a friend! :) He has a large Graziano, in the neighborhood of 20". He has a 15" three jaw on it now. He has offered me the use of it. It is used to face, semi truck rims, before polishing. It lives in a dirty environment and does not get good care. Mostly from ignorance on the proper care required, by the owner. For him it does what he needs it to do. He does no require great accuracy for the work it must do. I was intending on chucking it up in the three jaw, I knew he has on the lathe. During our conversation he mentions that he is going to buy a set of soft jaws for the chuck, and that is when it all hits me. I turn around and look, and sure enough it has a set of two piece jaws. I would best be served by facing this rotor in a set of soft jaws, and I have a good bit of scrap al. in my shop. So I tell him not to buy anything, I will make him a set of jaws for his chuck, as a return favor. I love it when a win win situation comes about.

More to come as I figure it out out!
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Prepare for tomorrow!
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JackF
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Re: Sportster rebuild.

Post by JackF » Mon Oct 13, 2014 11:04 am

NIce work Pat. If that Graziano is a Sag 20 it is an excellent machine. We had one at a shop I worked part time at for a few years and they are capable of doing fine work. It was my favorite lathe to work on when I was there. :D Harold will like this; it didn't have a DRO, just the dials and the addition of a Travel-A-Dial for the Z axis. Loved that machine. :)

Jack.

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seal killer
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Re: Sportster rebuild.

Post by seal killer » Mon Oct 13, 2014 12:45 pm

Patio--

I've followed this thread from the beginning. I read every post and am fascinated by the jobs you tackle.

--Bill
You are what you write.

Harold_V
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Re: Sportster rebuild.

Post by Harold_V » Tue Oct 14, 2014 1:25 am

JackF wrote:Harold will like this; it didn't have a DRO, just the dials and the addition of a Travel-A-Dial for the Z axis.
Indeed!
It's not the machine and how its equipped that makes things work--it's the skill of the operator.

An amazing amount of precision work has been done without DRO's! 8)

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

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ctwo
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Re: Sportster rebuild.

Post by ctwo » Tue Oct 14, 2014 10:29 pm

Alright, Captain America, all you need are some pipes and a little red and white paint to complete the look...at a much reduced cost.
Standards are so important that everyone must have their own...
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Disclaimer: I'm just a guy with a few machines...

Patio
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Joined: Wed Oct 06, 2010 3:14 pm
Location: Centralia Wa

Re: Sportster rebuild.

Post by Patio » Wed Nov 05, 2014 1:33 am

Jack, the lathe is a Saig 20.
I have been going back and forth, about whether to buy a new rotor, or repair the one I have. I have decided to buy a new one! I found one on fleabay for 53 bucks and it will be here this weekend! To fix it would cost me the price of a tool holder for a friends lathe, a bunch of time, and no guarantee of success, and that is with the offer of a cermet insert, from one of our wonderful members. I generally like a challenge, but time is becoming a premium. I do need this one running and sold come spring. My gal bought me a 62 Panhead that needs some loving, and I want to be able to ride it this summer.

I did get the front wheel bearing races installed tonight. I had the local shop pull the old ones for me. I figured I would use my hydraulic press, to put them in, when the time came. I had not thought of the fact the the wheel will not physically fit in the press. :oops: I little thinking outside of the box, and I came up with a solution. Being an electrician I have several hole knock out sets. I used the mandrel, a part of a knock out, put on backwards, an aluminium washer I enlarged the hole on, and a pipe coupling that I ran a tap through to make into a large nut. It went simple enough.

And for your viewing enjoyment, here are the pictures. :)
Tapped out the 3/4"X16 pipe coupling.
20141104_204537a.jpg
Got to use my, new to me mt2 drill to make a hole larger.
20141104_205128a.jpg
The pieces of the setup to pull the race into place.
20141104_213226a.jpg
Here it is in use.
20141104_213328a.jpg
The race, in place.
20141104_221530a.jpg
Doing what is needed with what I got. :)
If the rotor arrives this weekend, I should be able to get the front wheel back on the bike. Then I need to repair the caliper for it. I will also start on the rear wheel and brake set up. I am not sure how far I am going to go, making the brake work. I will make sure the wheel bearings are in good condition. The brake setup may cost more than I am willing to spend on this project. The rear drum brakes on these bike were not work real well when in good condition, so I may leave that for the next owner.

More to come, as I get it done.
Live for the moment!
Prepare for tomorrow!
Forgive the past!

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