Introducing "Little Mac" a 3-1/2" Gauge electric switcher

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Marty of FWF
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Introducing "Little Mac" a 3-1/2" Gauge electric switcher

Post by Marty of FWF » Sun Mar 13, 2016 11:01 am

Since I can't seem to figure out how post a picture, I will just give you the website info.
Check out "Little Mac" a 3/4" scale switcher kit.
www.fairweatherfoundry.com
Marty

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SteveM
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Re: Introducing "Little Mac" a 3-1/2" Gauge electric switche

Post by SteveM » Sun Mar 13, 2016 8:40 pm

Neat!

Steve

Pontiacguy1
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Re: Introducing "Little Mac" a 3-1/2" Gauge electric switche

Post by Pontiacguy1 » Mon Mar 14, 2016 10:48 am

Awesome! What does it weigh? How long do the 5 amp-hour batteries last on a typical run?

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JohnHudak
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Re: Introducing "Little Mac" a 3-1/2" Gauge electric switche

Post by JohnHudak » Mon Mar 14, 2016 12:53 pm

DSCN1194.jpg
Marty of FWF wrote:Since I can't seem to figure out how post a picture, I will just give you the website info.
Check out "Little Mac" a 3/4" scale switcher kit.
http://www.fairweatherfoundry.com
Marty

Here you go Marty..

jmurray
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Re: Introducing "Little Mac" a 3-1/2" Gauge electric switche

Post by jmurray » Tue Mar 15, 2016 6:16 am

I had the pleasure of being the 230lb ballast weight on the back of the 1" scale flat car,that Marty was on working the radio control...and I have to tell you to not let the size of this little engine fool you...it can run 2 adults up hill from a standing stop on wet rails with very little wheel slip. In my estimation, it could pull 2+ riding cars and a caboose easily.

The Little Mac has amazing quality, workmanship, and not to mention how strongly built this loco is!

It designed from the begining to save the buyer cost of entering into the live steam hobby, or an engine to travel with across the country for those that would like to visit clubs, with the quality of a high production design.

Buy one today, its cost is less than most o-scale Lionel engines, and get out and enjoy the "High Line!"

Congrats Marty..nice job!
C&O EMD F7A 24vdc Locomotive(Tune Trains)
Chessie diesel switcher(5hp Free lance design) 0-4-0
Pine Grove Vineyards Davenport (Ride-Trains)Switcher 0-4-0
Wolf Run and Tambine Clishay 0-4-4-0(Bob Maynard design)

http://www.neols.net (NorthEastern Ohio Live Steamers)
2017 Neols Secretary(neolssecretary at windstream.net)

Marty of FWF
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Joined: Mon Jan 18, 2016 11:36 pm

Re: Introducing "Little Mac" a 3-1/2" Gauge electric switche

Post by Marty of FWF » Wed Mar 16, 2016 9:44 am

Thank you so much for the great review John. What an unexpected pleasure.
Answering a couple questions from above.
The engine weighs in at just under 30 lbs.
The controller is a Dimension Engineering SyRen10 and the motor is a 100 Watt, 24Volt.
That works out to 4.2 max amp draw at stall. The batteries should be able to sustain that for just over an hour.
But, since the gearing allows the wheels to slip before stalling, I would have to venture a guess at 2.5 to 3 amps being closer to max draw.
And since I haven't had the chance to actually "kill" the batteries yet, I would also have to guess that the unit should run at least a couple hours before needing charged. That would be continuous running.
However; these batteries (12 volt 5 Ah) cost less than $20 each and can be easily found on a number of battery supplier's web sites.
Crown Battery's stock number is 12CE5T1.
And since the cast aluminum shell is held down by Neodymium magnets, no tools are needed to lift off the shell and swap out the batteries. The batteries have blade connectors.
BTW, the shell is held "down" by magnets; however, it is held in "location" by 8 rolled dowel pins in the deck, "trapping" the inside corners of the cab.
So, with the initial run in the books, I am more than thrilled with the results of the design. And as soon as I can get Mac out for another run, I will be adding statistics to the website.
I would also like to mention that having a radio controlled unit installed in this unit is by far the best way to go.
The Dimension Engineering motor controller supplies the power for the receiver, so NO additional batteries are needed.
You can control your engine and not be within arms reach, which gives you freedom to not only run your engine, but watch it run at the same time.
Think about it; real full size locomotives are using radio control units.
And for around $60 you can get a brand new, name brand two channel RC unit. I suggest Traxxas or Spectrum radios. Check out Horizon Hobby.com.
AND, I would be happy to purchase, install and set it up, at just radio cost. In other words, you just pay the cost of the RC unit.
Heck, you could always use the radio for other units. Just get another receiver, (about $20)
Thanks again John for review and Thanks Mr. Hudak for posting the picture.
If you have any questions, just ask.
Marty

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H&NERY
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Location: Hillsboro, Wisconsin

Re: Introducing "Little Mac" a 3-1/2" Gauge electric switche

Post by H&NERY » Sun May 15, 2016 7:46 pm

I have purchased one of these from Marty, here is some pictures of my assembly. This little locomotive is well designed and built and I can't wait to operate it. This will be my MOW locomotive while I build my rail line and fill in utill I get one of my 2 steamers up and operating. I probably have about 3 or 4 hours total in it to get it this far. The cab castings are easy to work with and clean up. I will post more pictures when finished.
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Marty of FWF
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Re: Introducing "Little Mac" a 3-1/2" Gauge electric switche

Post by Marty of FWF » Mon May 16, 2016 8:05 pm

Hey,
I like the raised white lettering on the bearing box covers....
I might have to paint mine...

Thank you for the nice review.
Marty of FWF

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H&NERY
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Location: Hillsboro, Wisconsin

Re: Introducing "Little Mac" a 3-1/2" Gauge electric switche

Post by H&NERY » Mon May 16, 2016 8:18 pm

I used a silver paint pen, great for fine detail work. It set it off quite nicely. Working on the cab tonight.

Mr Ron
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Re: Introducing "Little Mac" a 3-1/2" Gauge electric switche

Post by Mr Ron » Thu May 19, 2016 11:15 am

After watching the video on making the wheels, I came away realizing how much time and effort goes into making them. Sure the machine does most of the work, but those CNC machines are costly. $62 for (4) wheels is a steal. If I were making them manually, it would take me probably two days to make them plus the cost of material. I applaud you Marty for your contribution to the large scale model railroad fraternity. I build in 3/4 scale and am inspired by your work.
Mr.Ron from South Mississippi

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Marty_Knox
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Re: Introducing "Little Mac" a 3-1/2" Gauge electric switche

Post by Marty_Knox » Thu May 19, 2016 11:47 am

Congratulations, Marty! It's really nice to see an innovative product like this. Well Done!

Marty of FWF
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Re: Introducing "Little Mac" a 3-1/2" Gauge electric switche

Post by Marty of FWF » Thu May 19, 2016 12:39 pm

Good afternoon group,
Thank you for the positive -ness.
I have tried to post a photo of what is in development now.
I seem to be pixels challenged. Any hints?
In the meantime a description will have to do.
3/4" Barber Truck. Fully CNC'd from 6061 billet aluminum.
Full ball bearing (not needle). Full CNC'd steel axle from prehard 4140, with unique "no bind" geometry. So bearings are pressed into the side frames, yet the axles easily flex.
And since there seems to be a few CNC'd wheels laying around the shop, I guess we'll use those. The aluminum will be anodize after tumbling. Probably semi gloss black.
Again, sorry I can't get photos to stick. And I really don't want to post too much on the website, because I don't want folks to think they can have them at the front door in a few days.
Thanks again for the compliments.
I really do try to give the quality I would expect, pricing aside.
Marty of FWF

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