Train Mountain Track Building update

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rkcarguy
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Re: Train Mountain Track Building update

Post by rkcarguy » Mon Jan 07, 2019 5:15 pm

Train mountain has very large turn radiuses if I remember correctly. On my 12" gage RR I'm stuck with ~40' radius turns and expect some wear.

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BigDumbDinosaur
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Re: Train Mountain Track Building update

Post by BigDumbDinosaur » Mon Jan 07, 2019 5:35 pm

rkcarguy wrote:
Mon Jan 07, 2019 5:15 pm
Train mountain has very large turn radiuses if I remember correctly. On my 12" gage RR I'm stuck with ~40' radius turns and expect some wear.
Just oil the wheels and you'll be fine! :D :) :shock: 8) :P :roll: :wink: :lol:
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rkcarguy
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Re: Train Mountain Track Building update

Post by rkcarguy » Mon Jan 07, 2019 5:44 pm

BigDumbDinosaur wrote:
Mon Jan 07, 2019 5:35 pm
Just oil the wheels and you'll be fine! :D :) :shock: 8) :P :roll: :wink: :lol:
I was surprised to see a flange lubricator near one of our local grade crossings and noticed it's set to apply the lubricant rather liberally. I don't know how that is supposed to work.
With my proposed grades, that would be a good way to ensure my train got a one way ticket to the lowest portion of the RR. :oops:

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Erskine Tramway
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Re: Train Mountain Track Building update

Post by Erskine Tramway » Mon Jan 07, 2019 7:05 pm

rkcarguy wrote:
Mon Jan 07, 2019 5:44 pm
I was surprised to see a flange lubricator near one of our local grade crossings and noticed it's set to apply the lubricant rather liberally. I don't know how that is supposed to work.
With my proposed grades, that would be a good way to ensure my train got a one way ticket to the lowest portion of the RR. :oops:
We had several flange oilers on our Subdivision. A couple of them got 'sanded' pretty heavily :D The oil is 'supposed' to get on just the side of the rail head, so that, if the flanges rub, they'll have some lubrication. It doesn't always work out that way :shock: Some of our motors had holders for grease 'sticks' that were spring loaded and rubbed on the first and last axle flanges.

I've picked up some stuff called "EZ Slide". It's a graphite 'paint', where the carrier evaporates and leaves just the graphite. I'm going to try it this summer on the 25-foot curve at the top of the hill. I'll just paint it on the side of the rail head and see how it works. I have used black wheel bearing grease, just 'gobbed' on with a little stick, and it doesn't seem to do any harm. I just thought that the EZ Slide would collect less wind blown dust, since it will dry after application.

Mike
Former Locomotive Engineer and Designer, Sandley Light Railway Equipment Works, Inc. and Riverside & Great Northern Railway 1962-77
BN RR Locomotive Engineer 1977-2014, Retired

rkcarguy
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Re: Train Mountain Track Building update

Post by rkcarguy » Mon Jan 07, 2019 7:45 pm

I've got some stuff that I use in more places than it's meant to. Maxima's chain wax(for motorcycles). When racing in loam or sand, we used to use it because it would soak in and dry leaving a non-sticky waxy film that didn't pick up sand. I use it often for assembly lube on axles and collars, threads, etc. It could work well, provided you don't spray it on the top of the rail.

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Re: Train Mountain Track Building update

Post by Glenn Brooks » Mon Jan 07, 2019 10:56 pm

With tight radius curves, just widen the gauge 1/16” or an 1/8” to prevent hard contact on the flanges. Works very well on my 12” gauge track, with sub 40’ curves.

The bigger problem for me is wet rail on uphill grades. Causes the drivers to slip when I don’t keep my speed up.
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NP317
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Re: Train Mountain Track Building update

Post by NP317 » Tue Jan 08, 2019 11:43 am

"The bigger problem for me is wet rail on uphill grades."

Working sanders!
~RN

rkcarguy
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Re: Train Mountain Track Building update

Post by rkcarguy » Tue Jan 08, 2019 11:46 am

Glenn Brooks wrote:
Mon Jan 07, 2019 10:56 pm
With tight radius curves, just widen the gauge 1/16” or an 1/8” to prevent hard contact on the flanges. Works very well on my 12” gauge track, with sub 40’ curves.

The bigger problem for me is wet rail on uphill grades. Causes the drivers to slip when I don’t keep my speed up.
The diverging route portion of my turnout router fixture has a transition built in(required because of the groovy track method) that widens the gage in the curved portion. I'm planning on simply dropping the ties into my turnout fixture if I need to open up the gauge in a curve.
I'm hoping that 4 more drive wheels are going to give me enough grip, if not, I may have to add a working sander.

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