What does it realy take?

This forum is dedicated to Riding Scale Railroading with propulsion using other than steam (Hydraulics, diesel engines, gas engines, electric motors, hybrid etc.)

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CANINDUST
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Joined: Sat Oct 10, 2009 10:47 pm
Location: Nova Scotia Canada

What does it realy take?

Post by CANINDUST » Thu Nov 05, 2009 9:28 pm

I took my young kids to a scale train track here in Nova Scotia this summer and was astonished with the set up they had. They took us around the track on electric and gas powered trains. When we were leaving they were firing up live steam engines. They let us put the kids on them for some pics and I asked the guys there what does it take to make one. They said first you have to be crazy. Is their good plans available? What is the price? How mush is cast? Basically what is involved?
There is 1000 ways to skin a cat

Some people grind a tool and work all day, some work all day grinding tool.

There is a difference between scratching your a__ and tearing is to pieces.

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Bill Shields
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Crazy?

Post by Bill Shields » Fri Nov 06, 2009 4:50 pm

Cost is relative to size and complexity.

A basic 3/4" scale 0-4-0 engine can be built for very little, ONCE you have the machinery and tools to do so...or have access to something like a school shop that allows such.

$100,000 for a big 4-8-4 or larger is not an unheard of price.

If you have the money, it isn't crazy.

6491
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Post by 6491 » Fri Nov 06, 2009 6:24 pm

On the other hand my little electric critter would have cost me about $600.
A lot of scrounging and EBay...See my Kogakgallery.
Have a good one....John.
"MALCOLM MOORE LOCO & THE 100 FOOT RAILWAY" on Facebook.

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steamin10
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Post by steamin10 » Sat Nov 07, 2009 1:03 pm

You dont have to be crazy, but it helps.

Having determination, and a creative mind is better, but not an assurance. If you like playing catch with the kids, more than trying to keep them still for a 2 minute train ride, then play catch, and enjoy your kids. Take them to Ditzny park, or Many Flags, and be DAD instead of a hermit that plays with trains. It can be obsessive. I am.
Big Dave, former Millwright, Electrician, Environmental conditioning, and back yard Fixxit guy. Now retired, persuing boats, trains, and broken relics.
We have enough youth, how about a fountain of Smart. My computer beat me at chess, but not kickboxing
It is not getting caught in the rain, its learning to dance in it. People saying good morning, should have to prove it.

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steamin10
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Post by steamin10 » Sat Nov 07, 2009 1:09 pm

Oh, ya. FYI. I am a scrounger. I just picked up 4 heavy shelves form a library case, that are 15" wide, and 60- inches long. I envision two new cars, a flat and a gon with 8 inch sides from the other two 12 inch shelves.

I enjoy my 'junk sculpting' into the shape of trains. Most of my working materials are from the dumpster except my tools ( open to argument here, as they were cast from indutry), and cost me little bu tthe time and agrevation , uh err, enjoyment of fitting things together.

Depends on your approach.
Big Dave, former Millwright, Electrician, Environmental conditioning, and back yard Fixxit guy. Now retired, persuing boats, trains, and broken relics.
We have enough youth, how about a fountain of Smart. My computer beat me at chess, but not kickboxing
It is not getting caught in the rain, its learning to dance in it. People saying good morning, should have to prove it.

willy

Post by willy » Sat Nov 07, 2009 1:52 pm

speaking of scrounging. our track in cherryfield had a fellow (Phil Samis) whom built trucks using box end wrenches for the side frames.

CANINDUST
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Location: Nova Scotia Canada

Thanks

Post by CANINDUST » Sat Nov 07, 2009 7:39 pm

I think I will keep visiting he club here with the kids and enjoy them with them. I am more interested in finding out how they work. The club here just asks for a donation so maybe I will volunteer some shop time.
There is 1000 ways to skin a cat

Some people grind a tool and work all day, some work all day grinding tool.

There is a difference between scratching your a__ and tearing is to pieces.

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Bill Wilkins
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Post by Bill Wilkins » Sat Nov 07, 2009 9:26 pm

Join the Club, go to meetings, volunteer for work projects. You don't have to own an engine, that can come later if desired. Clubs are always in need of energectic people. You can become a conductor and soon you'll find yourself as engineer behind either the clubs engine or someone's.

Involve the young'ins. Have Fun

Bill W.
Plum Cove Chassis, freelance body - 2008 - Present
Wabash 569 - Allen Mogul - April 09-Jan 12
Bob Snippe Alco S-4 - Feb 12 - Apr 15

CANINDUST
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Location: Nova Scotia Canada

nice work

Post by CANINDUST » Sat Nov 07, 2009 10:52 pm

southpass wrote:On the other hand my little electric critter would have cost me about $600.
A lot of scrounging and EBay...See my Kogakgallery.
Impressive, I like how everything looks aged very realistic.
There is 1000 ways to skin a cat

Some people grind a tool and work all day, some work all day grinding tool.

There is a difference between scratching your a__ and tearing is to pieces.

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steamin10
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Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2003 11:52 pm
Location: NW Indiana. Close to Lake Michigan S. tip

Post by steamin10 » Sun Nov 08, 2009 4:33 am

Umm. In most Clubs, everybody wants to lead, so that others can follow. It is human nature, and as clubs mature, the old farts like me, can do less of the manual labor of maintaining what is there.

Clubs appreciate the fact that someone picks up a rake, or a shovel, and Does soemthing to help share the load of keeping things in tune. Empty trash barrels, after a meet, sweep up the engine house. Anything to avoid just making the Club a private disneything for the kids. Get them involved with some house keeping, it wont hurt. Most older guys, enjoy the Grampy thing and the miles of smiles from the youngsters, and volunteer to give em a ride, but manners will rule.
Big Dave, former Millwright, Electrician, Environmental conditioning, and back yard Fixxit guy. Now retired, persuing boats, trains, and broken relics.
We have enough youth, how about a fountain of Smart. My computer beat me at chess, but not kickboxing
It is not getting caught in the rain, its learning to dance in it. People saying good morning, should have to prove it.

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Benjamin Maggi
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Post by Benjamin Maggi » Sun Nov 08, 2009 8:53 am

If you are interested in finding out about costs for a steam locomotive, I would recommend that you order an ALLEN MODELS catalog. I don't remember the cost, but I am going to guess around $15.

Address: 5994 Cuesta Verde Goleta, California 93117-1808.
Tele: (805) 967-2095

They produce castings for a wide range of engines, and their prices probably represent the "low end" of the spectrum if you decide to build using castings. If building from bar stock, then it goes as low as you can scrounge for. Other companies that offer good products in the "lower" ranges include Little Engines and Railroad Supply- both also have websites.

For diesels, I would recommend you check out the RAIL SYSTEMS, MOUNTAIN CAR COMPANY, CANNONBALL, and PLUM COVE STUDIOS websites. All can be found through googling. These (which were chosen based on my memory, not due to any connection with them) will give you ideas as for how much train cars and small diesel engines go for.
Last edited by Benjamin Maggi on Sat Nov 14, 2009 8:24 am, edited 1 time in total.
"One cannot learn to swim without getting his feet wet." - Benjamin Maggi
- Building: 7.25" gauge "Sweet Pea" named "Catherine"

10 Wheeler Rob
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What it takes is up to you

Post by 10 Wheeler Rob » Fri Nov 13, 2009 5:05 pm

The what it takes really depends on your taste and what you are willing to accept as well as what you are willing and able to do for yourself.

Look at the for sale and sold pages on http://www.discoverlivesteam.com/ web site, its perty good smap shot of what things sell for, there are adds by builders there also.

And remember most of these clubs exist and run because of the volinteer labor that build and maintian the track, bulidings and grounds. So its just not having wuipment and paying a membership alone.

Rob

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