The home shop machinist, health of the hobby

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RSG
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Re: The home shop machinist, health of the hobby

Post by RSG » Tue Nov 12, 2019 8:23 am

Harold_V wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 4:09 am
I've made mention before, I think, but I retired when I was just shy of my 55th birthday. The only regret I've ever had was that it couldn't have been sooner, but that was not to be.

Enjoy! There's nothing quite like living to one's own schedule.

H
Amen to that! I left at 54 as well! (last spring) :wink: The thing is, my new boss is very strict :lol: (so it seems) as I've only been out fishing once this fall. Normally when I was working I'd take a few days off each week during the fall. Since I retired I've never been so busy in the home shop!
Vision is not seeing things as they are, but as they will be.

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seal killer
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Re: The home shop machinist, health of the hobby

Post by seal killer » Tue Nov 12, 2019 10:23 am

AllenH59--

That is a great story! Congratulations!

As a former college dean, I often employed outside help in such manner. Doing so brought fresh ideas into the academic community; ideas are the lifeblood of academia.

Way-cool on you!

--Bill
You are what you write.

Harold_V
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Re: The home shop machinist, health of the hobby

Post by Harold_V » Tue Nov 12, 2019 4:33 pm

RSG wrote:
Tue Nov 12, 2019 8:23 am
The thing is, my new boss is very strict :lol: (so it seems) as I've only been out fishing once this fall. Normally when I was working I'd take a few days off each week during the fall. Since I retired I've never been so busy in the home shop!
That's called "being responsible", and is the chief reason why one tends to be successful.
I went to school with a guy who operated a machine shop many years after graduating high school. He couldn't understand how anyone running a shop could make money. For him, the typical day was to show up late, take an early and long lunch break, then end the day early.

Proudly, I was fired from the last job I held. My attitude towards my bosses (ever try to please nine individuals, each of whom were pulling in different directions?) got me dismissed from my position about two weeks before I would have quit. My machines had just arrived, but my shop was not yet operational.

On that job, we worked five 12's and a six (on dayshift) so I was used to long hours. That didn't change when I started working for myself. It was routine for me to put in no fewer than 12 hours each day, often seven days per week. I had to make it work, and I did.

The guy who thinks being self employed is the key to not putting in any time isn't living in the real world. Being self employed often permits one to establish his/her own schedule, but it is far more demanding of one's attention, assuming there is hope of success in the business plan.

Some folks seem to think that a successful guy is "lucky".

What I have learned in my many years is that luck is closely associated with effort. The harder I've worked, the luckier I became.

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

JackF
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Re: The home shop machinist, health of the hobby

Post by JackF » Wed Nov 13, 2019 9:54 am

I "retired" at 57 after being laid off. :lol: Like RSG, I had a lot more time to fish when I was working than after I retired. :roll: Much of the "new" time was spent on things around the house and land that were neglected while I worked or fished. I am just now getting back to fly fishing and of course working in the shop.


Jack.

Mr Ron
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Re: The home shop machinist, health of the hobby

Post by Mr Ron » Wed Nov 13, 2019 12:34 pm

I retired at 55, but had to resume working until final retirement at 75. Now at 85, I am busier than ever before. I have to attend to the daily chores of shopping , cooking and home maintenance, more so because of my wife's health issues. That leaves me with little time to work in my shop. I also have health issues that I have to deal with as I grow older and I know they will only get worse with each passing day. Right now I'm trying to get by from day to day and take each day as I find it. Some days are good, others. not so good. Thankfully, I have friends and family who can help me if needed. My shop time these days is limited and with the event of winter arriving, less time will be spent in my shop. Not all is lost; I can still plan even if those plans may never see light of day. The point is to keep busy, regardless of what it is you are keeping busy at. Right now, I'm trying to set a longevity record, and hopefully more shop time is in there. Sorry if this may seem OT.
Mr.Ron from South Mississippi

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seal killer
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Re: The home shop machinist, health of the hobby

Post by seal killer » Wed Nov 13, 2019 5:55 pm

Mr. Ron--

Go for the longevity record and I hope your wife's health improves.

--Bill
You are what you write.

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neanderman
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Re: The home shop machinist, health of the hobby

Post by neanderman » Thu Nov 14, 2019 3:12 am

Mr. Ron:

Best wishes for being in an unenviable situation.
Ed

Le Blond Dual Drive
US-Burke Millrite MVI
Atlas 618
Files, snips and cold chisels

Proud denizen of the former "Machine Tool Capitol of the World"

Cabbagestack
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Re: The home shop machinist, health of the hobby

Post by Cabbagestack » Sun Feb 02, 2020 2:33 pm

NP317 wrote:
Sat Sep 21, 2019 10:24 am
My lathe has 4G WiFi connection to my iPhone.
I'm so happy.
I'm an Old Guy
RN
My lathe has a bluetooth-connected TouchDRO system, displayed wirelessly on an Android tablet; not to mention w/ 1 micron glass scales.
I'm a happy guy and an old one too!


No, seriously joking aside. I really do have the TouchDRO system on my Android tablet. For all this complaining about cellular devices, I can store (and do!) PDF's of tap & drill tables, feed & speeds, threading charts, G-Wizard, various machining apps, electronic Machinery's Handbook, a slick scientific calculator etc. on an Android tablet the size of 7" x 9" sits in place of the big DRO boxes that used sit on a bracket on the lathe. I can pull up any one of those right on Android tab that's displaying my X & Z coordinates, just like you would with any app on a phone: minimize the DRO coordinate display, maximize the calculator, or some other app; do your work; then resize the DRO app again and off you go. Right there at the machine. No running over to the desk to look up something. Simple and efficient as it gets. The old oversize DRO boxes could not do anything except display coordinates and few simple related tasks, let alone be wireless. And it doesn't cost that much!

It's a tool to me and a damn slick one at that. Sure I can make phone calls from it. Sure someone can message me, but that's not what I choose to do with it. I suppress those aspects when I'm down in the workshop at the lathe. If I'm a slave I don't mind being a slave to the TouchDRO Android (if you can call it being a slave). But it's what you CHOOSE to do with the technology. The only one making a slave to a cellular device is YOU! Don't answer the damn phone if you don't want to! I do that all the time. Isn't that what you did before there were any Android or IOS devices? Well?

We live in an age now where relatively cheap 3D printing is widely available to the Model Engineer. We live in an age now where ball screws and glass scales have come way way down in price. In just the last 3 years I have implemented in my workshop: 3D printed patterns (via a wireless printer), lost-PLA bronze casting, put Centroid Acorn CNC on my milling machine (cost of about $5000). Such things couldn't be hoped for back half a dozen to a dozen years ago like the prices of today. Then too I have Fusion 360 3D CAD/CAM -- free to those that make less than 100,000 a year. Pretty sweet. I wouldn't trade what we have now for anything.
And I haven't even touched on the Maker movement that's spreading across the country. At the makerspace down the road from me they have several Bridgeports (one is CNC I occasionally used) five Jet 13" lathes, surface grinder, waterjet; the other floors have 3d printers, CNC sewing machines wood shop with table saws, planers, CNC router
And its all mostly young people using the facility (a quite a few young women too) !! - I'm in the minority, not too many middle aged, or old guys. You might want refigure when implying this young generation doesn't know anything or can't do anything other than Facebook and videogames.

We live in a phenomenal era, folks! The explosion of virtually free knowledge via Internet, Technology (like I've mentioned above) and the sharing of knowledge is tremendous. Sharing knowledge as in this forum or others like CNCZone or AlloyAvenue is basically what helped guide me through a lot of projects, plus shop and machine improvements. Wouldn't be even near the same amount 7-10 years ago.

And you might consider taking time to guide some of these "waayward" teenagaers or young people who dont seem to "know anything or can't do anything other than Facebook and videogames" and show them this world which I have described above with all the advantages. I do it often - evangelizing about Live Steam - wherever I go! (i've been cooped up in the VA Hospital for 2 weeks now and I even evagelize here, relentlessly. I have found a few young doctors that have been fascinated by my pictures of scale model Live Steam engines but have never heard about or seen one). I explain what it is i'm working on, how make things, what I do when i encounter difficulty. What worked, what didn't. If they think a certain aspect is cool I try to focus on that to draw them in to win another convert.

Plant seeds. Maybe a few will sprout and grow.

Give that some thought.

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NP317
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Re: The home shop machinist, health of the hobby

Post by NP317 » Sun Feb 02, 2020 5:42 pm

Chuckle.
I was being facetious, but there's no reason not to use new technologies to increase our home manufacturing abilities.
Amazing things are happening in individuals' hobby manufacturing shops!
RussN

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