The home shop machinist, health of the hobby

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steamin10
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Location: NW Indiana. Close to Lake Michigan S. tip

Re: The home shop machinist, health of the hobby

Post by steamin10 » Tue Apr 21, 2015 8:34 am

There is no doubt in my mind that the safety nannies would have fits, and mares' about this operator. Having said that, they would probably have him do a safety course before driving the lawn tractor next year, or building his go-cart the next. Some kids 'get it' very early, others not so much. It can give you grey hair watching over such younguns', but for me, it is ENTIRELY worth it, to build the independent spirit, and logic behind it for the skills learned.

This kid needs a dusty lawn tractor to call his own, to work without blades and be a low speed transport, and learn that systems work together, and must be maintained.

Good on ya, thanks for the view.
Big Dave, former Millwright, Electrician, Environmental conditioning, and back yard Fixxit guy. Now retired, persuing boats, trains, and broken relics.
We have enough youth, how about a fountain of Smart. My computer beat me at chess, but not kickboxing
It is not getting caught in the rain, its learning to dance in it. People saying good morning, should have to prove it.

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tornitore45
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Location: USA Texas, Austin

Re: The home shop machinist, health of the hobby

Post by tornitore45 » Tue Apr 21, 2015 9:18 am

The safety nanny would go as far to call it child endangerment.
Children need experiences, even some involving a mild risk of minor injuries to develop self awareness. That way will grow to recognize potentially dangerous situation as teenagers and adults.
Of course common sense must prevail.

Is the youth scraped knees and the mashed thumb that keep you safe into retirement.
Mauro Gaetano
in Austin TX

Torch
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Location: Muskoka

Re: The home shop machinist, health of the hobby

Post by Torch » Tue Apr 21, 2015 11:40 am

The Safety Nannies can go honk on Bobo. This is my grandson, a precious joy that I would never put at risk of serious harm. Physical OR developmental harm. Wrapping the kid in sixteen layers of bubble wrap and locking him in the closet until he's 18 falls under the latter classification. So I will continue to allow him to explore his world, learn skills and experience life as I deem appropriate to his current ability and under an appropriate level of supervision. And the only ones who can override my judgement in this matter are his parents.
<rant mode off>

So, no radial arm saw for now, but he can handle a bandsaw:

Image

Or drill press, if the material is adequately secured first:

Image

Or lathe:

Image

Torch
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Location: Muskoka

Re: The home shop machinist, health of the hobby

Post by Torch » Tue Apr 28, 2015 4:38 pm

And for the youngest, something with no moving blade and only one control lever (that he knows about) to start the learning process:

Image

gcarsen
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Location: Tigard, Oregon

Re: The home shop machinist, health of the hobby

Post by gcarsen » Tue May 05, 2015 3:29 pm

My boy Lucas just turned 3!! he loves being in the shop with me and watching, and "helping" me with everything!!!
he is still to small to do anything yet, though he like to play with all the wrenches and handles. worried when he will be taking things apart behind my back!! he knows what kind of bolts the different wrenches and allen wrenches fit!! you give him a bolt and a threaded hole, he can put them together!!
for his safety, one of the things that I found at a Garage sale last year was an older fireman's helmet with the hinged visor for a whopping $3.00. he loves fire trucks and love wearing the helmet. he understands that if he wants to be out in the shop with me, he has to have "his" helmet on and the visor down. that way his eyes, and face are fully protected. when Mom brings him to the shop, he gets his helmet on as soon as he comes in the door smiling!!
Grant
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luas2.jpg

WJH
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Re: The home shop machinist, health of the hobby

Post by WJH » Tue May 05, 2015 4:47 pm

My son is only 9 months old, but every time I carry him into the garage, his eyes light up, I think he gets sensory overload. I'll be surprised if he is not into trains and machine tools.

redneckalbertan
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Re: The home shop machinist, health of the hobby

Post by redneckalbertan » Tue May 05, 2015 7:16 pm

With safety lead by example! My boy, 4 1/2 now, willingly wears the safety gear when I do. I take something off so does he. I told him once to put something on that I had taken off and he asked why he had to but I didn't. I couldn't answer the question so I put the glasses back on.

Torch
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Location: Muskoka

Re: The home shop machinist, health of the hobby

Post by Torch » Tue May 05, 2015 7:40 pm

I stopped by the largest gun dealer in the area the other day, and they had a whole wall of safety glasses in all different styles. But none in children's sizes.

Cursing my fortune, I continue my quest...

piedmontg
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Location: Hills of Illinois

Re: The home shop machinist, health of the hobby

Post by piedmontg » Sat May 09, 2015 5:07 pm

Natale-finding-an-edge.jpg
Hi

I have been fortunate to be able to engage my two granddaughters in our hobby. My secret to keeping them engaged was it was their project and whenever they were tired of working in the shop they should just put things away and go off and do what they wanted. Their first project when they were 8 and 10 was a finger engine for their dad on Father’s day. Next up was a pair of oscillating steam engines (photo published in Model Engine Builder), and now they are working on a hot air engines at 16 and 18. Each project has had them learning –first Safety, Second SAFETY, Third SAFTEY, they come in the shop go to their tool cabinet get their glasses and the hair up in rubber bands whether to visit or work. No phones, electronics, etc. in the shop period, no distractions. As they progressed through each project they learned about the machines, reading prints, then instruments dial caliper and micrometer (not digital), set up, cleaning up the tools, how to file, lathe and mill operation, etc. On the hot air engine they are basically on their own unless they have a question.

Lest you think that is all they are superb quilters. They alternate projects with grandpa then with grandma. They have both been attending a Thresheree since they were six months old. So they also found a nitch at the show, Rachel on a steam pile driver since she was 13 and recently Natalie a conductor on the train. Before that they ran my ¼ scale traction engine and separator. The most important experience for them is school and they both excel.

Whether they continue any of the hobby activities into their adult lives is anybody’s guess. I know they apply their skills – making and fixing things on their own, explaining to the 7th grade teacher why the sewing machine would not work and then fixing it! At Christmas this year I gave them each a machined PM research engine just for fun. Rachel upon realizing that it was all machined blurted out – “Grandpa this is cheating!” Only someone who had spent hours on machine tools making chips would have said that. So I know the experiences will be with them always.

Enjoy the photos the shop ones are on the hot air engine, in the one with Natalie finding the edge is a photo in the background of them with the finished finger engine – big grins!
I never posted a picture before looks like I can only do four. Not sure on the order, but you will get the idea.

Bob
Attachments
Rachel-flywheel-eyes on readout not the tool.jpg
Natale 0 80 holes.jpg
Rachel-flywheel-mill-work.jpg
Natalie-Tumbling-Block.jpg

piedmontg
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Location: Hills of Illinois

Re: The home shop machinist, health of the hobby

Post by piedmontg » Sat May 09, 2015 5:09 pm

Here are rest of photos

Bob
Attachments
Rachel-Broken-Star.jpg
Natalie-the-Conductor.jpg
Rachel-runing-the-Hammer.jpg
Rachel-up-the-Pile-Driver.jpg

JackF
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Location: Caldwell, Idaho

Re: The home shop machinist, health of the hobby

Post by JackF » Sat May 09, 2015 10:12 pm

Those are great pics, so good to see some of the younger generation taking more than just a passing interest in the hobby.

Jack.

Mr Ron
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Re: The home shop machinist, health of the hobby

Post by Mr Ron » Sun May 10, 2015 12:32 pm

When I was around 16, 64 years ago, I was offered a 16" SB lathe for free, but I lived in an apartment so it wasn't possible. Living in an apartment only allowed me a small Delta drill press. Throughtout the years and many moves, I was always interested in technology, having worked in the marine industry all my working life. Finally after being able to live in one place and in my own home, I have been able to build my 1200 sf shop for wood and metal working projects.
Now retired, I have the time to devote full time to my life long ambition to build my projects. My son and grandson both have followed in my footsteps of DIY as opposed to having everything done by someone else. My son has surpassed me in that respect. He tackles projects that I would never tackle, like lengthening the chassis of a Peterbilt he owns. He is career Air Force. Everything he knows, he learned by his own desire to know; I am very proud of him. Like myself, he does his homework and learns to do jobs that tradesmen get paid to do. His attitude is; if they can learn to do something, he can also. It's not rocket science after all.
All the tools and machinery that I have acquired over the years will be his some day; not too soon I hope. He taught himself welding and working on heavy equipment (not his occupation). He lives right next door in his own house on 4 acres I have 8 acres and he maintains all our maintenance needs without having to resort to outside help. I think he is part of a minority of people who still like to do their own thing. Most young people, not exposed to manual tasks would rather take the "gentleman's" path and keep their hands clean. I guess you either have the inclination or you don't.
Mr.Ron from South Mississippi

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