Book about precision

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12L14
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Joined: Sat Dec 29, 2012 2:56 pm
Location: Beyul

Re: Book about precision

Post by 12L14 » Sun May 05, 2019 4:39 am

Look what I found today:

http://www.survivorlibrary.com/library/ ... s_1915.pdf


I wonder if they got Connelly's "Machine tool reconditioning"?


edit-> nope...
They seem to be some prepper site(but quite reasonable), with a lot of fun stuff(steam&rail included)

http://www.survivorlibrary.com/index.ph ... ne%20tools

http://www.survivorlibrary.com/index.ph ... ng-general

http://www.survivorlibrary.com/index.ph ... -reference

http://www.survivorlibrary.com/index.ph ... %20engines
Tool&die maker since yesterday ;)

Mr Ron
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Re: Book about precision

Post by Mr Ron » Sun May 05, 2019 6:35 pm

Thanks for the great links. Although it is not the book of my original topic, I found this to be extremely interesting. I spent 3 hours reading one of the links. Many of the tests used on machine tools are still used today, but there were described a lot of other tools used to test machine tools that most will not be aware of. It is definitely a scholarly work for anyone wanting to know how machine tools are made and tested for accuracy and precision. One interesting item I came across was from the 1894 book, "Model Engine Construction" where there is a description of a surface plate used for grinding a flat surface, using emery powder and oil. in the absence of a surface plate, "THE FLAT BED OF THE LATHE TO GRIND THE METAL UPON" may be used. That bit of advice may make machinists cringe at the thought of it. If I were to grind a piece of metal on Harold's Monarch bed, I'm sure he would shoot me on sight and rightfully so.
Mr.Ron from South Mississippi

pete
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Re: Book about precision

Post by pete » Sun May 05, 2019 9:43 pm

I wouldn't use that recommendation even for a cheap off shore granite surface plate I owned never mind the small way area of the once common old school cast iron flat bed lathe ways. Plus there's no need to do anything like it. Tom Lipton on his Oxtools YT channel provides more than enough information about high precision hand lapping to do so for smaller parts using a whole lot cheaper and better methods. Such as a copper faced flat lap using penny's super glued to a block of metal and you start by lightly facing those pennies off in a lathe and then hand lap the copper flat with another two identical lapping plates. Any of them can then be used with lapping powder to lap your parts that are harder than the copper. It's a bit complicated, time consuming and labor intensive. But still quite cheap and doable in almost any home shop if the need is there.

If the test methods your mentioning were done by a Dr. Geoge Schlesinger I'm well aware of them and have been for many years. Any machine tool that comes with any kind of a certificate of tested accuracy including the newest and best CNC made almost anywhere today, then all of the test methods used can be directly traced to his work. My lathes test certificate certainly was.He was I think the first to literally write the book about how to do it and the maximum allowable limits for tolerance in the machines parts depending on the class of work being done. The actual testing can get a bit complex to fully understand what's being done. And for a good lathe why some areas are purposely misaligned from being dead square. But for the most part other than a lathe test bar almost everything else can be done using a standard 10ths dti and a good level. A lot of the test methods in the Connelly book Machine Tool Reconditioning are also based on it. I've heard but haven't yet found it on the net that there's a written book with all the research and the book done in Russia that's just as good to possibly better. Since I can't read Russian it's not of much use even if I did find it so I haven't looked very hard.

Mr Ron
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Re: Book about precision

Post by Mr Ron » Mon May 06, 2019 9:45 am

I must be some sort of a nut. Other people read romance stories, crime stories, murder mysteries, comic books and even newspapers; me, I enjoy reading technical publications, ever since I was a kid, I would read tool catalogs when other kids were reading comic books. I wonder what a psychologist would say about me.
Mr.Ron from South Mississippi

Harold_V
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Re: Book about precision

Post by Harold_V » Mon May 06, 2019 3:09 pm

I dunno, but I still recall looking through chemical catalogs as a boy and being fascinated. That interest manifested itself in eventually refining precious metals, which was the reason I was able to retire at a young age (54). Refining precious metals is all pretty much done chemically, if you don't know.

Regardless of the reason, or what others may think, it's certainly better to pursue such interests than to be a couch potato, watching mindless entertainment on TV.

That's my story, and I'm stickin' toit! :-)

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

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SteveM
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Location: Connecticut

Re: Book about precision

Post by SteveM » Mon May 06, 2019 6:37 pm

Mr Ron wrote:
Mon May 06, 2019 9:45 am
I must be some sort of a nut. Other people read romance stories, crime stories, murder mysteries, comic books and even newspapers; me, I enjoy reading technical publications, ever since I was a kid, I would read tool catalogs when other kids were reading comic books. I wonder what a psychologist would say about me.
Probably the same as for me.

I had the J.C. Whitney catalog memorized. Sears tool catalog too. I was 17 before I realized that Sears sold stuff other than tools and car parts.

When I went to my grandparents house, grandpa had about a decade of popular mechanics on the shelves in the sunroom, so I would just sit out there and read.

The last fiction book I read on my own without being required to read it for school was "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang" (when the movie came out in 1968).

Steve

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NP317
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Re: Book about precision

Post by NP317 » Mon May 06, 2019 11:04 pm

I grew up with Scientific American as a reading staple is our house.
I was thinking in graphs by the time I learned to read.
Thanks, Dad!
~RN

Mr Ron
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Location: Vancleave, Mississippi

Re: Book about precision

Post by Mr Ron » Tue May 07, 2019 10:37 am

When I was about 12 (1946), I had a Delta drill press, a small chemical lab, an electronics bench. I would spend my weekly allowance on tools. I would go to Patterson Brothers hardware, downtown New York City on a Saturday morning and spend a few hours there before deciding what tool I could buy with what money I had. At home, I had a bookcase full of tool catalogs from every tool company, and there were a lot at that time. Almost all of those companies are now gone or combined into one shell company. Certainly the quality was better back then compared to what exists today. I had a complete collection of Popular Science and Popular Mechanics magazines dating back to the early 1920's. I would go to the second hand book/magazine store and buy old issues of those magazines. I had a friend who pretty much shared my interests. I might have not been as typical a "nerd" then, but today, I would definitely qualify for that title.

Since this thread is going somewhat OT, it probably should be moved to the "Junk drawer". I take opportunities like this to present insight into how it was and how it now is. I know people reading this could care less how it was, but I feel it needs to be said for the record. Millennials have no idea how it was nor do they care. Understanding the past allows us to cope with the present and plan for the future.
Mr.Ron from South Mississippi

John Hasler
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Location: Elmwood, Wisconsin

Re: Book about precision

Post by John Hasler » Tue May 07, 2019 10:41 am

Mr.Ron writes:
Millennials have no idea how it was nor do they care.

I know millenials that are just as you were in 1946. They are also just as atypical as you were then.

Rwilliams
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Re: Book about precision

Post by Rwilliams » Tue May 07, 2019 11:31 pm

I recently was loaned a copy of the Moore book and wish I had seen such information long ago when I was starting into precision machine work. It was very enlightening and has made me look at my machine tools with a whole new respect for what they were designed to do.

Upon returning the book to the owner, who actually bought it during a week long session at the Moore facility, he enlightened me with an interesting fact. Seems the Moore people have kept track of book sales over the years. Far more copies of the book have been sold to foreign countries than within the United States. China and Japan are the major purchasers it seems.

Based on some of the new tools I have seen made in China lately, they may have read the book, but did not take good notes.

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