Preparing Machines for Moving

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SteveHGraham
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Re: Preparing Machines for Moving

Post by SteveHGraham » Wed Jun 12, 2019 9:14 am

The band saw has an eye at the top for lifting.

Raising either machine by the base, without a pallet, would be disastrous. Even with a pallet, it would be unpleasant and risky. Shoving the forks under a machine while it's on its side (as mine were in the truck) would tear the machine up.

Forklift forks stay level when they go up and down. My tractor's forks don't. I have to jiggle the joystick to keep them reasonably level. You can imagine what it would be like, trying to keep a top-heavy machine balanced using the joystick.

Lowering the machines into their mobile bases would be impossible if they were sitting on forks. It was hard enough, using rope.

These are not heavy machines by tool standards. The band saw is something like 325 pounds. The drill press is probably near that figure. You can stand on one of my tractor forks and jump up and down without bothering it, so there was no risk of bending the bucket or forks.
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Inspector
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Re: Preparing Machines for Moving

Post by Inspector » Wed Jun 12, 2019 10:41 am

You can use longer straps in a basket lift to reach the base if there is any doubt about lifting from the top. Basically like the lift the neighbour and I used to get my 20" bandsaw out of the shipping container of shop and household stuff when I moved here. Table was removed for the move. We did the same for the table saw. I was able to manage everything else myself. With this pick there was ratchet strap going around the 2x4 and column to the skid steer so it couldn't rock side to side or tip out the front. With longer straps reaching above the load a few ratchet straps cinched around the outside would keep the load from tipping through.

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liveaboard
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Re: Preparing Machines for Moving

Post by liveaboard » Wed Jun 12, 2019 5:23 pm

SteveHGraham wrote:
Wed Jun 12, 2019 9:14 am
I have to jiggle the joystick to keep them reasonably level. You can imagine what it would be like, trying to keep a top-heavy machine balanced using the joystick.
I don't have to imagine, my tractor FEL pallet forks are the same.

Yes, of course you're right that hanging the tool is safer; I lifted mine from below because it was the only way to get in through the low doorway.
I rocked it and kicked blocks under, for a heavier machine used a prybar to get a little clearance.
slipped the forks under and strapped the tool to the forks with a heavy ratchet strap.
Some places I rolled heavy machines [600-800 lbs] on the floor on pipes.
All very slowly.

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SteveHGraham
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Re: Preparing Machines for Moving

Post by SteveHGraham » Tue Jun 18, 2019 12:46 pm

I had some fun yesterday. I was using a subsoiler to dislodge a stump, and I ran into a huge rock I didn't know was there. I had to use the tractor and a rope to lift it.

Learned an interesting thing about lifting heavy things with ropes. You have to think about the possibility that they will swing BEFORE lifting, not just as they're about to leave the ground. I realized the obvious just as this one was about to take off. I was not able to react fast enough, and it swung into the Kubota's bumper. No damage, but something to think about in the future.

The rock looks small in the photo, but it was large enough to disturb the tractor. Biggest one I've moved yet.
06 17 19 big rock tied to kubota forks small.jpg
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spro
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Re: Preparing Machines for Moving

Post by spro » Tue Jun 18, 2019 6:05 pm

While it is difficult to surmise, that rock looks like a meteorite buried underground for ages. I would take a chisel and find what it is made of. Sure I'm stupid but not all rocks are the same. Where did it come from ? it wasn't river rock . Some ancient volcano spewed it high or maybe used for fill? Either way, it is an intact ancient rock. If you break it open, you can read what is by the striations and grains and minerals. There is beauty inside these things too.

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SteveHGraham
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Re: Preparing Machines for Moving

Post by SteveHGraham » Tue Jun 18, 2019 7:31 pm

It's some kind of calcium-based rock. In South Florida, the underground structure is oolite, which is a light stone made of loosely compacted shells and corals. Up here, it's sort of similar, but there are no air holes in it, and it's heavy. It's pretty hard. Some of the rocks here chip like flint.
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spro
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Re: Preparing Machines for Moving

Post by spro » Tue Jun 18, 2019 10:58 pm

It has become a rock which holds secrets. I know you don't have time for this now.

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Re: Preparing Machines for Moving

Post by spro » Wed Jun 19, 2019 2:35 pm

I really don't want to abuse this thread further but there was a reason. When I was really young, living in Tennessee, I was exploring everything . There was the normal type rock of the mountains and different type of different ranges. The calcium or shale type were already blown thru for highways and left remarkable cliffs ( which kids like just had to scale) . When at creek beds, I found totally different rocks and even then, wondered where they came from. I took to splitting them apart to see what was in there. For a short time I figured that I could lick the insides of a split rock and sort of taste what it was composed of. Heck, I was a kid and Dad was away in Alaska. I believe, on "long distance" he cautioned to not lick any rock. He did send a package from where he was stationed in Alaska. It was full of different rocks. Most were probably from the beaches and others, inland. I had never seen rocks as these. Some were deep black, others white with shimmering crystals, jade and amber. That box remains somewhere. I split one and wished I hadn't . So I guess I have rocks in my head :lol:

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