Horrors of Buffer Safety

Topics include, Machine Tools & Tooling, Precision Measuring, Materials and their Properties, Electrical discussions related to machine tools, setups, fixtures and jigs and other general discussion related to amateur machining.

Moderators: Harold_V, websterz, GlennW

User avatar
SteveHGraham
Posts: 7546
Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2009 7:55 pm
Location: Florida

Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by SteveHGraham » Tue Jul 02, 2019 8:50 am

I'm trying to decide whether I need to bolt my new buffer to the floor. I have been reading all sorts of safety materials. I haven't seen much of anything warning against machines falling over, but there is a ton of material on flying workpieces.

I found a document written by a couple of engineers. They looked at all sorts of safety devices which you would expect to work. Their conclusion, if I understand it, is that the safety devices were no good because they all introduced new hazards.

They mention workpieces that caught on a wheel and made several revolutions, in spite of the presence of rear and top scrapers around the wheel.

Interesting fact: because a workpiece caught in a soft wheel acts like a double pendulum, its linear speed can be faster than that of the wheel by an order of magnitude. That means it can fly over ten times as fast as the speed of the wheel at its periphery. I think that comes out to over 420 mph on an 1800-RPM buffer with 8" wheels.

It looks like you need to stand to the side of the wheel, wear a full face mask, and consider a leather apron, not to mention gloves.

And a dust mask.

http://www.triodyne.com/SAFETY~1/SB_V11N1.PDF
Every hard-fried egg began life sunny-side up.

User avatar
tornitore45
Posts: 1702
Joined: Tue Apr 18, 2006 12:24 am
Location: USA Texas, Austin

Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by tornitore45 » Tue Jul 02, 2019 1:27 pm

The buffer falling over is one problem but the just a movement or a rebound can catch you off guard and grab the part.
Mauro Gaetano
in Austin TX

User avatar
Frank Ford
Posts: 591
Joined: Sun Dec 16, 2007 12:41 pm
Location: Palo Alto, CA
Contact:

Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by Frank Ford » Tue Jul 02, 2019 6:17 pm

Bolt the buffer near the rear of a piece of heavy (say two layers of 3/4" plywood, with a substantial portion sticking out in front. When you approach the buffer to do some work, plant your hoof on the plywood to keep it from tipping over backwards. Easy to waltz the rig around the floor to save some space as needed.
Cheers,

Frank Ford

User avatar
SteveHGraham
Posts: 7546
Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2009 7:55 pm
Location: Florida

Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by SteveHGraham » Tue Jul 02, 2019 6:35 pm

It's starting to look like falling isn't much of an issue with these machines. There is a ton of hysterical safety material on flying workpieces, but nearly nothing about falling machines.
Every hard-fried egg began life sunny-side up.

jcfx
Posts: 448
Joined: Sun Aug 09, 2009 1:24 pm
Location: NY

Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by jcfx » Tue Jul 02, 2019 7:19 pm

Second what Frank Ford says.
Mine is a home brew just a 1/2 horse 1725 motor bolted to a plywood board that I can clamp to any
available flat surface.
FWIW, if you're leaning into the buffer wheel hard enough to tip the buffer and the stand then you need to reassess your buffing -fu.

spro
Posts: 7536
Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2006 11:04 pm
Location: mid atlantic

Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by spro » Tue Jul 02, 2019 7:44 pm

Frank knows about this and it is great suggestion.

Magicniner
Posts: 506
Joined: Thu May 30, 2013 4:40 am

Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by Magicniner » Wed Jul 03, 2019 2:07 am

SteveHGraham wrote:
Tue Jul 02, 2019 6:35 pm
It's starting to look like falling isn't much of an issue with these machines.
It will be assumed that machines are securely mounted/attached/bolted down since not doing so contravenes the most basic of workshop safety rules, and common sense.

User avatar
SteveHGraham
Posts: 7546
Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2009 7:55 pm
Location: Florida

Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by SteveHGraham » Wed Jul 03, 2019 8:20 am

Thanks for your guess.
Every hard-fried egg began life sunny-side up.

earlgo
Posts: 1422
Joined: Sat Jan 29, 2011 11:38 am
Location: NE Ohio

Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by earlgo » Wed Jul 03, 2019 9:26 am

The big 8" double buffers at the Colorado School of Trades in 1970 were bolted securely to the cement floor. Neither fell over when I was there. They would occasionally grab a gun part from a limp fingered person and hurl it at the floor making for a lot more work, and a lesson in gripping tightly. For me the most aggravating thing was the static electricity build up. If you weren't paying attention and forgot to ground it somehow, it would light up your life for an instant.
--earlgo
Before you do anything, you must do something else first. - Washington's principle.

Mr Ron
Posts: 1790
Joined: Tue Dec 22, 2009 12:36 pm
Location: Vancleave, Mississippi

Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by Mr Ron » Wed Jul 03, 2019 9:33 am

It just goes to show that a seemingly simple tool can turn out to be quite dangerous.
Mr.Ron from South Mississippi

Magicniner
Posts: 506
Joined: Thu May 30, 2013 4:40 am

Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by Magicniner » Wed Jul 03, 2019 10:13 am

SteveHGraham wrote:
Wed Jul 03, 2019 8:20 am
Thanks for your guess.
Your photo appears to show holes in the base for fastening it down, what I'm actually guessing is that you ignored them :D

User avatar
SteveHGraham
Posts: 7546
Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2009 7:55 pm
Location: Florida

Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by SteveHGraham » Wed Jul 03, 2019 10:31 am

Thanks for another guess.
Every hard-fried egg began life sunny-side up.

Post Reply