Horrors of Buffer Safety

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Bentworker
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Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by Bentworker » Wed Jul 03, 2019 10:43 am

The whole idea behind bolting it down might not be for the reasons you are contemplating.

I witnessed a round motorcycle headlight trim being buffed, and the way it was being held allowed the inner rolled lip of the ring to catch on the buffer, which in a split second pulled the ring over the wheel and onto the buffer arbor. Now the buffer was still going about Mach 1, but with a headlight ring on the arbor. This caused it to be so off balance that it ripped itself from the less than ideal mounting on the workbench, flew off the bench and danced around on the floor until it could be unplugged.

Anyway I personally think bolting it down isn't for when things go right - it is so that when things go wrong it at least stays in the same place.
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Magicniner
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Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by Magicniner » Wed Jul 03, 2019 10:51 am

SteveHGraham wrote:
Wed Jul 03, 2019 10:31 am
Thanks for another guess.
I got more :D

I guess someone who doesn't know their buffer should be bolted down shouldn't be using one :mrgreen:

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SteveHGraham
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Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by SteveHGraham » Wed Jul 03, 2019 12:48 pm

Trolling isn't really supposed to be a part of the Home Machinist forum. Disappointing.
Every hard-fried egg began life sunny-side up.

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SteveHGraham
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Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by SteveHGraham » Wed Jul 03, 2019 2:03 pm

Bentworker wrote:
Wed Jul 03, 2019 10:43 am
The whole idea behind bolting it down might not be for the reasons you are contemplating.

I witnessed a round motorcycle headlight trim being buffed, and the way it was being held allowed the inner rolled lip of the ring to catch on the buffer, which in a split second pulled the ring over the wheel and onto the buffer arbor. Now the buffer was still going about Mach 1, but with a headlight ring on the arbor. This caused it to be so off balance that it ripped itself from the less than ideal mounting on the workbench, flew off the bench and danced around on the floor until it could be unplugged.

Anyway I personally think bolting it down isn't for when things go right - it is so that when things go wrong it at least stays in the same place.
The safety document I linked to says you should never buff anything rough, and it more or less says never to buff the interior of anything. You can buff the outside of a picture frame corner, but buffing the inside is asking for trouble. They use the phrase "reentrant corners" to describe any corner tighter than 180 degrees.

Apparently, bench buffers are not necessarily intended to buff all parts of a project. They just save time on the parts that are safe to buff. Eastwood's buffing guy says you buff what you can on the bench buffer, and then you use a handheld buffing tool for the rest.
Every hard-fried egg began life sunny-side up.

mikechoochoo
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Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by mikechoochoo » Wed Jul 03, 2019 4:44 pm

I used to buff aluminum as part of my job. Very dirty and hot work. Your clothes will be black! Wear eye protection, leather gloves, and impact toe leather shoes or boots. Until you learn it and sometime after, you will have pieces of work pulled from your hands and thrown to the ground in front of you.
Mike

Mr Ron
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Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by Mr Ron » Thu Jul 04, 2019 1:41 am

This is similar to what can happen on a buffer, but this time it was a bench grinder. I was cleaning the chain from my chain saw and thought it would be a good idea to clean the chain on the wire wheel. Well it started to remove the grime and without warning, the wire wheel grabbed the chain and whipped it around. The end result was several stitches on my hand at the ER. The chain being about 3 feet long, would be traveling 500+ mph at the tip. That is the scariest thing that ever happened to me and I have been around all kinds of dangerous machinery all my life. The home shop is probably the most dangerous place in your home. Aside from metal working machines, I also have a woodworking shop that has many dangerous machines. I have 4 different kinds of saws, a wood lathe, several disc, drum and belt sanders, a router and drill press, any of which could do me in if I wasn't careful. The chain incident was something I never saw coming or could ever imagine happening. A buffer may not seen threatening, but bad things can happen in a micro second. Take care.
Mr.Ron from South Mississippi

Magicniner
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Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by Magicniner » Thu Jul 04, 2019 3:46 am

SteveHGraham wrote:
Wed Jul 03, 2019 12:48 pm
Trolling isn't really supposed to be a part of the Home Machinist forum. Disappointing.
Constantly creating threads with questions or questionable statements already resolved by manufacturer's documentation, equipment or common sense isn't really supposed to be a part of the Home Machinist forum. Disappointing.

RMinMN
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Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by RMinMN » Thu Jul 04, 2019 6:16 am

Mr Ron wrote:
Thu Jul 04, 2019 1:41 am
This is similar to what can happen on a buffer, but this time it was a bench grinder. I was cleaning the chain from my chain saw and thought it would be a good idea to clean the chain on the wire wheel. Well it started to remove the grime and without warning, the wire wheel grabbed the chain and whipped it around. The end result was several stitches on my hand at the ER. The chain being about 3 feet long, would be traveling 500+ mph at the tip. That is the scariest thing that ever happened to me and I have been around all kinds of dangerous machinery all my life. The home shop is probably the most dangerous place in your home. Aside from metal working machines, I also have a woodworking shop that has many dangerous machines. I have 4 different kinds of saws, a wood lathe, several disc, drum and belt sanders, a router and drill press, any of which could do me in if I wasn't careful. The chain incident was something I never saw coming or could ever imagine happening. A buffer may not seen threatening, but bad things can happen in a micro second. Take care.
You haven't spent much time in the kitchen have you. Sharp knives abound, hot surfaces are necessary, and dangerous chemicals lurk, plus one never knows when the other sex is going to walk in and see what you have done to her kitchen.

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SteveHGraham
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Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by SteveHGraham » Thu Jul 04, 2019 10:41 am

Magicniner wrote:
Thu Jul 04, 2019 3:46 am
Constantly creating threads with questions or questionable statements already resolved by manufacturer's documentation, equipment or common sense isn't really supposed to be a part of the Home Machinist forum. Disappointing.
Forgive me, Harold, but...

You are one of the rudest, least helpful people here. I can't recall you ever posting anything useful (as I have, many times), but you are eager to jump in with immature, advice-free sniping that destroys productive threads. Some day, you should post something useful, just to see what it's like.

You should go over to Practical Machinist where the other trolls lurk. You have no concept of manners or the purpose of this forum. Your troll posts are not clever at all. In fact, they reveal that you don't understand what we're talking about.

People like you kill forums.

I'm sure you will respond with another immature post, prolonging the suffering for everyone.
Last edited by SteveHGraham on Thu Jul 04, 2019 10:44 am, edited 1 time in total.
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SteveHGraham
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Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by SteveHGraham » Thu Jul 04, 2019 10:44 am

RMinMN wrote:
Thu Jul 04, 2019 6:16 am
You haven't spent much time in the kitchen have you. Sharp knives abound, hot surfaces are necessary, and dangerous chemicals lurk, plus one never knows when the other sex is going to walk in and see what you have done to her kitchen.
The kitchen is actually pretty bad. I have a friend who sometimes visits with her three sons. I told them the area between the stove and sink is the Zone of Death, and every time I see them there while food is being prepared, I yell at them and run them out. It amazes me that people let kids run around like savages in kitchens.
Every hard-fried egg began life sunny-side up.

Magicniner
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Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by Magicniner » Thu Jul 04, 2019 12:24 pm

SteveHGraham wrote:
Thu Jul 04, 2019 10:41 am
Magicniner wrote:
Thu Jul 04, 2019 3:46 am
Constantly creating threads with questions or questionable statements already resolved by manufacturer's documentation, equipment or common sense isn't really supposed to be a part of the Home Machinist forum. Disappointing.
Forgive me, Harold, but...
Steve,
I'm getting complements by PM on standing up to the forum's foremost Troll!
Go figure! :D

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SteveHGraham
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Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by SteveHGraham » Thu Jul 04, 2019 12:58 pm

I should add that I have discovered the "ignore" feature of the board. Highly recommended.
Every hard-fried egg began life sunny-side up.

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