Horrors of Buffer Safety

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SteveHGraham
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Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by SteveHGraham » Fri Jul 05, 2019 6:09 pm

My current 8" grinder came with rubber feet, and that's what I've been using. I'm concerned about getting pinched in the guards, but other than that, it doesn't scare me.
Every hard-fried egg began life sunny-side up.

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liveaboard
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Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by liveaboard » Fri Jul 05, 2019 6:40 pm

I just hold mine down against the workbench with one hand and hold the work in the other.

spro
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Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by spro » Fri Jul 05, 2019 7:16 pm

Yeah okay... I remember different grinders which would flip upon startup. You had hold them down. Doesn't take long to realize that isn't wise. They need to fixed, clamped someway that you aren't actually in contact with them. Who knows when a short to case happens and when the humidity is right there. I've run one bolt and that is half a$$ed because the grinder wants rotate around that one point. If the grinder is secured by at least two, you have more confidence in grinding anything.
A friend bought a new 8" or 10" grinder with the steel/ iron pedestal. He assembled the wheels and turned it on. As it came to speed it was walking across the cement floor until the cord was unplugged. Sure it was unbalanced and he trued the wheels later but how can you even do that if it isn't mounted tight?

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BadDog
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Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by BadDog » Fri Jul 05, 2019 8:44 pm

Many of my grinders are mounted to a massively heavy industrial cart I have defined as my "grinding cart". I have a 7" Baldor and Baldor Carbide grinder each mounted to the heaviest of the HF grinder bases (the one with the thick/heavy cast base). And finally, an 8" Baldor that's used outside for heavy cleaning and wire wheel work (and heavy mess when cleaning) that is mounted to a brake drum off a semi tractor. Drum must be close to 100 lbs, and moves only grudgingly when I make an effort to move it (tip-n-spin-walk). None of these have ever offered to go walk-about at inconvenient times, and I've used similar setups over the years without issue. In fact, in my memory starting from working in my grandfather's shop when I was a teen (building first car, a '70 '340 Cuda bought as a hull from a junkyard) until now, I can only remember 3 grinders bolted to a fixed surface (i.e. bench). They've always been semi-mobile because I/we never knew quite where they needed to be for the next job...

Not saying it's the ideal safety situation, and I'm sure would give OSHA fits, but that's my experience with that type of machine. For that buffer, I like best the idea of a heavy mount, perhaps on a drum like my 8". Maybe with addition of an apron to stand on "just in case" something like the grap-n-hold described earlier results in a badly out of balance scenario.

Not crazy about a momentary foot switch because I never know quite how I'll need to stand when presenting a work piece to it. And not crazy about the foot e-switch because if you are (or it knocks you) off balance, it may be hard to get a foot to it.
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SteveHGraham
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Re: Horrors of Buffer Safety

Post by SteveHGraham » Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:54 pm

My feeling is that you educate yourself about the risks, you think about how much aggravation and expense you're willing to put up with, and you choose a level of danger you are willing to accept.

From what I've read, this thing is never going to have the danger designed out of it, so most of buffing safety is really good buffing practice, not equipment.
Every hard-fried egg began life sunny-side up.

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