Pull start repair.

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carlquib
Posts: 59
Joined: Tue Jul 24, 2007 7:00 am
Location: Southern Idaho

Re: Pull start repair.

Post by carlquib » Fri Jan 03, 2020 11:39 pm


B Mann wrote:
JackF wrote:
Mon Dec 30, 2019 3:37 pm
This is just a thought, if you cold mark on the outside cover where the shaft is, you could cut a hole in the outside cover big enough for the shaft to pass through.Then you could make a patch to cover up the hole and screw it to the cover. :roll: Like I said, just a thought. :D
Jackl
The lathe was a great idea, but no way to mount it. I am going to start with the mill. I am new to machining. I have a hold down kit on order. I have a 30% chance of it arriving tomorrow. I want to hold the cover down very secure.
Be careful clamping the housing down they aren't very robust. Maybe a screwjack or some packing under your clamps to prevent distortion. Make sure you watch your boring head too. If you use a conventional left hand boring bar you will have to run the mill in reverse to cut an outside diameter, which is fine as long as your boring bread isn't screwed together with a right hand thread. It is a nasty surprise to have your boring head unscrew in the middle of a cut.

My name is Brian and I'm a toolaholic.


B Mann
Posts: 37
Joined: Tue Sep 17, 2019 8:07 pm
Location: Northern Indiana (Michiana)

Re: Pull start repair.

Post by B Mann » Mon Jan 06, 2020 7:24 pm

carlquib wrote:
Fri Jan 03, 2020 11:39 pm
Be careful clamping the housing down they aren't very robust. Maybe a screwjack or some packing under your clamps to prevent distortion. Make sure you watch your boring head too. If you use a conventional left hand boring bar you will have to run the mill in reverse to cut an outside diameter, which is fine as long as your boring bread isn't screwed together with a right hand thread. It is a nasty surprise to have your boring head unscrew in the middle of a cut.

My name is Brian and I'm a toolaholic.
I got my hold down kit for the rotary table Saturday... It is smaller than the ones for the mill table. I put 4 clamps on it. They did a great job holding the cover. For the newbie machinist.... I used a 1/2" end mill and it worked out great. I have the shaft turned down to 5/8". I have the pulley cleaned up and working on a bushing for it. I am going to use a 5/8" x 3/4" oilite bearing. It should be here in a few days. Nice to have the machines put to good use.

Maybe not an excellent job, but surprised me how good it turned out so far.

JackF
Posts: 1565
Joined: Mon Jan 26, 2009 3:56 pm
Location: Caldwell, Idaho

Re: Pull start repair.

Post by JackF » Tue Jan 07, 2020 10:39 am

Sounds great. :D Show us some pics when you can.


Jack F

B Mann
Posts: 37
Joined: Tue Sep 17, 2019 8:07 pm
Location: Northern Indiana (Michiana)

Re: Pull start repair.

Post by B Mann » Fri Jan 31, 2020 8:18 pm

JackF wrote:
Tue Jan 07, 2020 10:39 am
Sounds great. :D Show us some pics when you can.

Jack F
This is the shaft after the milling. The rotary table worked nice.
Image

This is the pulley with the bushing. The pulley was quite flared out. So I did not bore it to nothing.
Image

B Mann
Posts: 37
Joined: Tue Sep 17, 2019 8:07 pm
Location: Northern Indiana (Michiana)

Re: Pull start repair.

Post by B Mann » Fri Jan 31, 2020 8:25 pm

Well everything turned out pretty well except the silver soldering. I am an amateur at that. I have been soldering since I was a teen. But with silver solder just lately. I don't do it much either. Maybe the TIG would have been better to set it in place. Well I am learning. The bearing did turn out well.

BTW what do you use to lube the oilite bearing?? Once it is together it may not see more lube for years.

Anyone know what to lube the recoil spring with??

Thanks for all the help.

Image

I also touched up the spots where the fingers wore it down. It took a little time. It was a back burner project.

John Evans
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Joined: Tue Jan 20, 2009 9:33 pm
Location: Phoenix ,AZ

Re: Pull start repair.

Post by John Evans » Fri Jan 31, 2020 8:42 pm

Normally you just soak oilite bushing in 20-30 W oil before installing . spring no lube would be best but if you insist use something that does not dry with age and become gummy.
www.chaski.com

Harold_V
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Joined: Fri Dec 20, 2002 11:02 pm
Location: Onalaska, WA USA

Re: Pull start repair.

Post by Harold_V » Sat Feb 01, 2020 2:09 am

Oilite bearings are sintered and infused with oil when made. They hold an amazing amount of oil, which becomes obvious if you machine on them, or heat them. Unless you've done something to cause it to leave, there should be adequate oil present for the bearing to function. However, I certainly agree that adding some, as John suggested, would do no harm. You can do that even after assembly by placing some oil on the bearing at any exposed surface. If the bearing has room, it will absorb some, and, if nothing else, oil the assembly so it doesn't start out dry on the surface.

Well done, by the way. I, too, would have stopped short of removing excess metal in the pulley. The moment there's enough machined to locate the insert and allow for soldering, the job is done. You're better off with the thicker wall.

As far as silver soldering goes, if you've fluxed properly and have not overheated the workpiece, once you have the solder molten, it will follow the flame from your torch. Simply keep moving, keeping an eye on the solder. Apply more if needed, but a small amount will cover a large area if you've created a desirable gap.

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

B Mann
Posts: 37
Joined: Tue Sep 17, 2019 8:07 pm
Location: Northern Indiana (Michiana)

Re: Pull start repair.

Post by B Mann » Sat Feb 01, 2020 12:49 pm

Harold_V wrote:
Sat Feb 01, 2020 2:09 am
As far as silver soldering goes, if you've fluxed properly and have not overheated the workpiece, once you have the solder molten, it will follow the flame from your torch. Simply keep moving, keeping an eye on the solder. Apply more if needed, but a small amount will cover a large area if you've created a desirable gap.

H
Can you use lead pipe solder flux??? Not enough flux maybe where I went wrong. A learning experience. I am used to prefluxed solder.

B Mann
Posts: 37
Joined: Tue Sep 17, 2019 8:07 pm
Location: Northern Indiana (Michiana)

Re: Pull start repair.

Post by B Mann » Sat Feb 01, 2020 12:51 pm

John Evans wrote:
Fri Jan 31, 2020 8:42 pm
Normally you just soak oilite bushing in 20-30 W oil before installing . spring no lube would be best but if you insist use something that does not dry with age and become gummy.
I used some moly lube on the spring a few years ago... And yes it got gummy. Maybe graphite?? I am always leery of metal to metal parts with no lube.

John Evans
Posts: 2102
Joined: Tue Jan 20, 2009 9:33 pm
Location: Phoenix ,AZ

Re: Pull start repair.

Post by John Evans » Sat Feb 01, 2020 1:28 pm

Well every recoil spring I ever had my hands on was dry,like on a lawn mower they live in a dusty environment, dry lube like graphite should be OK.
www.chaski.com

Harold_V
Posts: 18041
Joined: Fri Dec 20, 2002 11:02 pm
Location: Onalaska, WA USA

Re: Pull start repair.

Post by Harold_V » Sat Feb 01, 2020 5:23 pm

B Mann wrote:
Sat Feb 01, 2020 12:49 pm
Can you use lead pipe solder flux??? Not enough flux maybe where I went wrong. A learning experience. I am used to prefluxed solder.
No. The flux required for hard soldering (silver brazing, or silver soldering) is very different--it must be capable of handling the much higher temperatures involved. It is a water/alcohol based paste. There are formulations on the market sold under the Harris name, and commonly found at welding supply stores. Two types are available--one which is white, the other a dark brown color, which is the one I highly recommend. It is named Sta-Silv Black. It tolerates higher temperatures without failing.

If you fluxed with other materials, I'm surprised that you achieved any degree of success, assuming you used silver solder, not silver bearing solder.

Note that silver solder is not the same thing as silver bearing solder. Silver bearing solder melts at lower temperatures, and has lower tensile strength. It is silver in color. Silver solder (silver braze) melts in excess of 1,000° F and has a yellow color, due to the copper contained within.

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

ChipMaker4130
Posts: 151
Joined: Tue Dec 04, 2007 11:00 am
Location: Ivins, Utah

Re: Pull start repair.

Post by ChipMaker4130 » Sun Feb 02, 2020 7:59 pm

A note on the Harris Sta-Silv Black: it is a bear to remove after soldering. When I can, I sand-blast it off!

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