Parting tool used by Stefan Gottswinter

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Harold_V
Posts: 18041
Joined: Fri Dec 20, 2002 11:02 pm
Location: Onalaska, WA USA

Re: Parting tool used by Stefan Gottswinter

Post by Harold_V » Sun Feb 16, 2020 5:37 pm

whateg0 wrote:
Sun Feb 16, 2020 5:20 pm
There are a lot of things I wish I'd have had an interest in as a kid. To be honest though, I wonder if it would have become like a lot of the things I was interested in back then. I grew up designing and installing custom stereo system. Made more doing that than my real job waiting tables. Started to do it professionally at one point and it wasn't fun any more. So maybe finding interest in something later in life makes us appreciate it more?
I worked as a machinist/toolmaker for 26 years. As a hobby, when I had been involved in machining for 17 years, I started playing with the refining of precious metals, primarily gold. It wasn't legal to do that without a federal license (which I did not possess), but that changed not too long afterwards, so I could openly discuss refining.

The change in federal law (January, 1975) removed all restrictions on gold ownership and handling, which resulted in local jewelers (benchmen--the people who make jewelry) started calling on me to refine for them. What began as a hobby slowly evolved to being a full time job, one that took me away from machining (I was burned out) and allowed me to refine instead, as a way of making a living.

While it took a few years, the refining job became overwhelming. Soon it was no longer fun (although I never did get tired of watching gold precipitate). The long work day (rarely less than 12 hours) and long work week (typically no days off, week after week) made me dislike what I was doing.

When your fun project becomes your livelihood, pretty good chance it will get old and you'll learn to dislike what you're doing.

A close friend, Dr. Tedrow, who had not only a medical certificate (psychiatrist), but also a law degree, once told me that a person should have no fewer than five interests. That keeps one interested in something, even when one may grow tired (temporarily) of what was being pursued.

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

whateg0
Posts: 797
Joined: Sat Mar 28, 2009 3:54 pm
Location: Wichita, KS

Re: Parting tool used by Stefan Gottswinter

Post by whateg0 » Sun Feb 16, 2020 7:16 pm

That sounds like good advice, Harold. I know even the stuff I like doing sometimes needs a break, especially when you hot a frustrating part. The past couple nights that I spent in the shop, I scrapped two parts. Each ended that night's events. Shut down and went in for the night. Luckily, work had me on the road for the past week, and the last couple days have been spent in bed recovering from the flu. Without those distractions, I would have been ready to do something else for a couple days.

Dave

Harold_V
Posts: 18041
Joined: Fri Dec 20, 2002 11:02 pm
Location: Onalaska, WA USA

Re: Parting tool used by Stefan Gottswinter

Post by Harold_V » Mon Feb 17, 2020 2:47 am

Heh! Scrapped two parts, eh?
One of the realities of machining is that unless you do it constantly, you make mistakes, often the same one over and over.
It took me years to become proficient on the machines. There was a time when making a mistake was the exception. How I wish I could make that claim now. I, too, make mistakes, some of them so stupid that I can't understand how they happened, but then I realize I've been off the machines far longer than I was on them. When you don't use those skills, they diminish.

It doesn't help that I no longer see as I once did. I think back on the time I had to single point 80 pitch threads in tungsten---and did it all without the benefit of an optical comparator. Oh, yeah! The parts were accepted (balance weights for gyroscopes--military aircraft guidance systems). Those days are long gone.

Sorry to hear you're suffering with the flu. Our own Patio has recovered, but spent more than a week in total discomfort. So far, I've managed to dodge the bullet. I'm hoping for the best for the future.

Get well, my friend.

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

pete
Posts: 1826
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2009 6:04 am

Re: Parting tool used by Stefan Gottswinter

Post by pete » Mon Feb 17, 2020 3:07 pm

Finally got a chance to watch Stefan's video Dave. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJIdKqzWuDY I don't think I've ever failed to learn something and always be impressed with his skills & ability's in everyone of his videos. With the part tolerances he was working to and there size I think I'd scrap more than a few before getting even one to spec. I've done a few small parts and the work holding is always a major problem. Some clever well thought out order of ops. in those parts of his. I especially liked his method of getting the correct index orientation for those tiny boring bars, very simple and clever. And nice to know that Guhring small tool cutting system is at least available. I'd expect there at high $$$$$ though. If it's anything like there drills and taps it will be at the top of performance and quality.

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