How can you tell a year of an early Sheldon 11X36

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Mike R. in N.C.

How can you tell a year of an early Sheldon 11X36

Post by Mike R. in N.C. » Sun Mar 30, 2003 2:15 pm

I just bought this lathe and I'm cleaning years of sawdust from it being used for wood for over 40 years..... it has the quick change set up with the motor up top. I'm new to metal working and plan to enjoy this little fella. I believe it's a late 30's or early 40's ? let me know what you think of the old sheldons ? thanks Mike

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mendoje1
Posts: 180
Joined: Sun Jan 05, 2003 3:12 am
Location: Southern California

Re: How can you tell a year of an early Sheldon 11X36

Post by mendoje1 » Mon Mar 31, 2003 2:10 am

Mike, you might want to join and post your Sheldon lathe question at the following Yahoo group:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Sheldonlathe/

Jeff
Rockwell-South Bend-Ammco-Delta-Craftsman-Lincoln-Harris-& Harbor Freight too !

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Orrin
Posts: 307
Joined: Sat Jan 04, 2003 12:24 pm
Location: SE Washington State, near Moscow, Idaho

Re: How can you tell a year of an early Sheldon 11X36

Post by Orrin » Mon Mar 31, 2003 10:29 am

I don't have any way of dating Sheldons, but I have a 1948 thirteen-inch. Its serial number is TMWQ 14527. I like it so well that when I got a chance to buy a ten-inch Sheldon I whipped out the check book before the seller changed his mind. For some reason, I suspect it dates back to the sixties. Its serial number is EXL 28191. How does your serial number compare to them?

My 13-in. has the stepped pulleys stacked one above the other with the driving pulley above the headstock. The electric motor hangs out behind the upper stepped pulley. Motors of that era were very heavy and I find that this is of enormous importance in setting up a Sheldon.

Even if the lathe is perfectly leveled, the weight of the motor hanging out on such a long "lever arm" can cause misalignment problems. It is very important that all four legs of the lathe are firmly anchored to a solid floor.

My 10-in. is mounted on a cabinet with the drive motor mounted in the base. It was much easier to level and align. Sheldon put leveling screws between the lathe bed and the cabinet (so to speak. They are actually in the base of the bed.)

Enjoy your Sheldon! They are a good lathe!

Orrin
So many projects, so little time.

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