Inspired by Jose - a Micro Hand Tapper

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Frank Ford
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Inspired by Jose - a Micro Hand Tapper

Post by Frank Ford » Thu May 01, 2008 2:39 pm

Thought you might like to see this week's project.

Years ago I bought one of those "hand tappers" from Enco, and it has really improved my life. Tap breakage went way down, and alignment is a breeze.

I've always wanted a miniature version for use with #4 and smaller taps, so I finally set about making one. Here's the result:


Image

The little handle on top fits over a 1/4" hex shaft. It just drops in place, ready for use:


Image


Once I run the tap all the way down, I can lift the handle off and speed the tap out with my cordless drill:


Image

I can power tap, too, with the same drill in place.

The adjustable brass slider keeps things from rotating or moving too much as I go.
Cheers,

Frank Ford

Jose Rivera
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Tapping table

Post by Jose Rivera » Thu May 01, 2008 3:24 pm

Absolutely nice Frank!!

Now you have inspired me !! :lol:

Though you already have with you home page projects.
I've already made a similar devise to lock the reverse on my mill switch.
(Still have to get the new switch changed)
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There are no problems, only solutions.
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HotGuns
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Post by HotGuns » Thu May 01, 2008 9:36 pm

That thing is beautiful....a work of art.

Thankyou for that.
Bob

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seal killer
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Post by seal killer » Thu May 01, 2008 9:45 pm

Jose--

Did you ever measure those drill bits? I am interested in knowing if they were truly 0.015"

--Bill
You are what you write.

Jose Rivera
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Post by Jose Rivera » Thu May 01, 2008 10:17 pm

seal killer wrote:Jose--

Did you ever measure those drill bits? I am interested in knowing if they were truly 0.015"

--Bill
They are .039" or No. 61

They sure come in handy to refill my miniature drill indexing box that ranges down to .0135" or number 80. (The set is 80 to 61 about the size of a match box)
There are no problems, only solutions.
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Retired journeyman machinist and 3D CAD mechanical designer - hobbyist - grandpa

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tmcd
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Post by tmcd » Fri May 02, 2008 10:14 am

Frank and Jose you are both too good! Nice looking projects on both counts.

Tim

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seal killer
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Post by seal killer » Fri May 02, 2008 11:23 am

Jose--
They are .039" or No. 61
Hmmm. About 1mm.
--Bill
You are what you write.

Mike Walsh
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Post by Mike Walsh » Fri May 02, 2008 12:08 pm

Do you have any prints or anything of the sort that might assist us in creating something like this? I particularly like your design.

Do you know if something like what you've created might be adapted for a higher elevation (say to allow something 6" tall to fit underneath?).... I am thinking that once you get to something of that size, you might as well go ahead and use the full size one... But what if it was a 2-56 tap?

Just thinking out loud.

Thanks,
Mike

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Frank Ford
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Post by Frank Ford » Fri May 02, 2008 1:34 pm

Mike -

I keep saying I'm going to learn to draw before I make more stuff, but I have yet to even start on that learning curve. This little rig is strictly seat-of-pants construction, like most of what I do.

Fact is, I made it without taking into account the length of the tap, so my first setup was way too low. That's why there's a riser block under the arm! Once I got it made and working I realized I could make taller risers any time, so I became less angry with my hasty choice of height.
Cheers,

Frank Ford

Jose Rivera
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Post by Jose Rivera » Fri May 02, 2008 6:37 pm

Frank Ford wrote:Mike -

I keep saying I'm going to learn to draw before I make more stuff, but I have yet to even start on that learning curve. This little rig is strictly seat-of-pants construction, like most of what I do.

Fact is, I made it without taking into account the length of the tap, so my first setup was way too low. That's why there's a riser block under the arm! Once I got it made and working I realized I could make taller risers any time, so I became less angry with my hasty choice of height.
Frank if allowed to use your design to make my own, I will put your unit on CAD for you.
I made a living since 1994 designing and drafting with CAD (2D and 3D) exclusively.

I'll send you some samples of works that I've done.

Now that I don't do it for a living I kind of miss drafting.

I can reverse engineer that for you for just the right of making one for myself.
Last edited by Jose Rivera on Sat May 03, 2008 10:31 am, edited 1 time in total.
There are no problems, only solutions.
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Retired journeyman machinist and 3D CAD mechanical designer - hobbyist - grandpa

Harold_V
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Post by Harold_V » Sat May 03, 2008 12:16 am

Mike Walsh wrote:Do you know if something like what you've created might be adapted for a higher elevation (say to allow something 6" tall to fit underneath?).... I am thinking that once you get to something of that size, you might as well go ahead and use the full size one... But what if it was a 2-56 tap?
I've used one of the full sized models to tap 0-80 threads in stainless. Sort of taxes one's ability, but it's possible. The job I tapped was inspected (defense work), so the minor diameter couldn't be increased to ease tapping. They went surprisingly well when I look back on the project. No broken taps. The only problem is the limited "feel" created by the mechanical advantage of the large hand wheel on the tapper. That small one is just the ticket for sensitivity.

Harold

BMyers
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Post by BMyers » Sat May 03, 2008 6:57 am

It is those projects that inspire me and want me to keep trying. After scrapping the second try on a part for an engine I am building I was ready to throw in the towel. But seeing your work Frank has caused me to go cut another piece of stock and try again.

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