Digital Height Gage

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golash
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Digital Height Gage

Postby golash » Sun Aug 16, 2009 6:26 pm

Hi

I`m in the market for a low cost height gage. I have the Shars catalog and
wonder if anyone here has one of their height gages.

http://www.shars.com/products/view/2119 ... eight_Gage

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DICKEYBIRD
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Postby DICKEYBIRD » Sun Aug 16, 2009 6:40 pm

Haven't seen a Shars but I got one of these recently and it's one heckuva bargain. May be the same unit even. It certainly works very well and is as accurate as my mikes & 1-2-3 blocks (and me) are. YMMV.

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/d ... mber=93488
Milton in Tennessee

"Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

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mechanicalmagic
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Postby mechanicalmagic » Sun Aug 16, 2009 7:04 pm

I have a height gauge exactly like the one from Shars. Not sure where I bought it, but I do have some Shars stuff, along with many ebay finds.

Shars does not spec an accuracy, but don't expect better than +-.001 (on a good day). I just checked mine. On a 1-2-3 block (2.002" side), on a granite surface plate, I got 2.001. Similar error on other sides. Mine seemed to always read high. If you are performing tight tolerance work, always use a standard and check your measuring instruments.

I use it most times to layout work, helps me from making that dreaded .100 error, when using an edge finder. Good for sheet metal layout too.

Dave J.
Every day I ask myself, "What's the most fun thing to do today."
9x48 BP clone, 12x36 lathe, TIG, MIG, Gas, 3 in 1 sheetmetal.

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Lew Hartswick
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Postby Lew Hartswick » Sun Aug 16, 2009 7:36 pm

mechanicalmagic wrote:
I use it most times to layout work, helps me from making that dreaded .100 error, when using an edge finder.
Dave J.


That made me chuckle. Once I used the vise jaw for the edge and then
added the .100 instead of subtracting it . Fun and games. :-)
...lew...

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Jose Rivera
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Postby Jose Rivera » Sun Aug 16, 2009 8:28 pm

I like the ones with dial because they're more "visual".

I can calculate extra material far much easier with a dial caliper than with a digital.

My head has never been very good at juggling numbers.
There are no problems, only solutions.
--------------
Retired journeyman machinist and 3D CAD mechanical designer - hobbyist - grandpa

toastydeath
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Location: Newark, DE

Postby toastydeath » Sun Aug 16, 2009 11:13 pm

We stick tenth indicators on all our height gauges instead of those little feely doodads they come with. Really helps with the consistency, and then you can also use it to check part geometry, hole location, etc quite a deal faster.

mechanicalmagic wrote:.... that dreaded .100 error, when using an edge finder. ....


Even on CNC, I crank the machine over .100 (from zero the DRO if on a manual, or zero the MPG wheel and do one turn on CNC) and check it visually. My scrap rate went down substantially after this practice began.

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Richard_W
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Postby Richard_W » Mon Aug 17, 2009 3:51 pm

I have 2 of the Harbor Freight 12" and they are still in the box. They were on sale at the HF parking lot sale and I got one for $20.00 at one sale. The other was $40 at another HF parking lot sale. Haven't used either one yet or the Enco granite plate.

I like the digital ones better, because several of the dial height gages it was hard to read the .100 counter. It was like the gears were sloppy and several of us had trouble reading them. Those were the good mitutoyo ones. I think they might have been worn out even though they were calibrated often.


Richard W.

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Jose Rivera
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Postby Jose Rivera » Mon Aug 17, 2009 9:22 pm

Agree to the counter, but once one gets used to it doing quick calculation is easier for me.

Hight gages are the "numero uno" tool for inspection. Not having one is like having your best hand missing.

For shop use ... naaaa !

Though after I learned the value of one after working for some 12 years doing final inspection; once I went back to machining it was a blessing to know how to use one.

The rest of the machinist looked at me as if had lost a marble.
Same look as when I introduce computers and CAD to them around 1992.
Commodore Amiga. As close as a Silicone Graphics computer that one could have for home use.

Some may still thinking .. what was that for ? :lol:
There are no problems, only solutions.

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Retired journeyman machinist and 3D CAD mechanical designer - hobbyist - grandpa

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JimGlass
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Postby JimGlass » Tue Aug 18, 2009 5:43 am

I bought a 12" digital electronic height gage on Ebay for around $80. Had it 5 years and like it.

Jim
Tool & Die Maker/Electrician, Retired 2007

So much to learn and so little time.

www.outbackmachineshop.com

Richard-TX
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Postby Richard-TX » Wed Aug 19, 2009 3:36 pm

Jose Rivera wrote:I like the ones with dial because they're more "visual".

I can calculate extra material far much easier with a dial caliper than with a digital.

My head has never been very good at juggling numbers.


Me either. The dial caliper and dial height gauge is tops for me. Last longer and cheaper to own too.

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Richard_W
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Location: Molalla, Oregon

Postby Richard_W » Wed Aug 19, 2009 5:44 pm

I find the digital calipers are cheaper to own. Usually when something is wrong a new battery fixes it. A dial caliper usually cost 2/3 of new to get fixed.


Richard W.

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Lew Hartswick
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Postby Lew Hartswick » Wed Aug 19, 2009 6:04 pm

Richard_W wrote:I find the digital calipers are cheaper to own. Usually when something is wrong a new battery fixes it. A dial caliper usually cost 2/3 of new to get fixed.
Richard W.

If you treat a dial caliper properly it'll last every bit s long as a digital one
and wont cost for batteries. They can be read in a lot more difficult lighting
conditions (seems to be common around a lot of shops) and to top it off:
I'm an ANALOG sort of guy. :-)
...lew...


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