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How to cut a mt2 taper

Posted: Sat Dec 10, 2011 5:07 pm
by mac.doogle
Can anyone explain how to cut a mt2 taper on a 7*14 lathe without the taper attachment? Or is it even possible?

Re: How to cut a mt2 taper

Posted: Sat Dec 10, 2011 6:08 pm
by Torch
Yes, it's possible.

I used the compound. And an existing MT2 taper to copy. I chucked up a tool with the taper I wanted to copy, then set the compound angle with the simple expediency of mounting a DTI on the tool post and carefully adjusting the angle so the DTI stayed constant as I cranked the compound in and out.

From there it was a simple matter of turning to the large diameter +.0005" or so with the cross-slide and turning the taper with the compound. Followed by various grades of sandpaper. I also made it a touch long at both ends so I could cheat by cutting it off at the desired minor diameter in case I overdid it with the sandpaper.

Not particularly elegant, but it worked.

If you really know what you are doing you could use sine blocks to set the angle against the tailstock ram. But I don't have any of those yet.

Re: How to cut a mt2 taper

Posted: Fri Dec 16, 2011 1:49 pm
by mac.doogle
That is a good idea. I spent all kinds of time trying to figure it out and all I had to do was ask? Simple and yea it may be crude but it beats the crap out of hours trying different setups.

Re: How to cut a mt2 taper

Posted: Fri Dec 16, 2011 3:40 pm
by Torch
Actually, if we ask real nice, maybe Harold will relocate this to the general discussion forum where it will get more traffic. There's a fairly good chance that there's other ways to do this and someone with more experience may jump in with a suggestion or two.

Re: How to cut a mt2 taper

Posted: Fri Dec 16, 2011 8:54 pm
by atty
I've just spent the last two days cutting tapers.....mt2 and mt1. Oddly enough, the mt1 kicked me around the hardest. Anyway, the "copy" method is certainly valid....howsomever.....we always find a way to introduce errors in our work, because the centers don't hit the same, or the phase of the moon is wrong.....something. I found the best check is to mount a dial indicator on the compound and measure the amount of deflection along the defined length of the taper, which for an MT2 would be 2.56". I tried the cheater method of thousandths per inch, and it just didn't seem to work out. I found myself chasing a few thousandths here and there which was amplified over the entire length. Do this check well before you get to the final dimensions of .700 and .572. It will give you plenty of time and room to make mid-course corrections. Even if you're close, leave a thou or so for sandpaper and further "fine tuning".

Re: How to cut a mt2 taper

Posted: Fri Dec 16, 2011 9:45 pm
by Ike
Atty and Torch both suggest good methods, no matter which you choose, be sure to check your work against
the a mt 2 socket. Give the socket a light coat of prussen blue and insert carefully insert your work piece,
give it a slight twist and pull it out and check the pattern of the blue, if all is good you should have about 75%
contact area.
edit: once you have your setup right, make several - you'll always be able to come up with a use.

Re: How to cut a mt2 taper

Posted: Fri Dec 16, 2011 9:47 pm
by GlennW
Hello Ike,

Welcome to the group!

Re: How to cut a mt2 taper

Posted: Fri Dec 16, 2011 9:51 pm
by Ike
Thanks Glenn!
I just happened to come across this forum while I was following a link.
And I'm glad I found you folks!

Re: How to cut a mt2 taper

Posted: Sat Dec 17, 2011 8:59 pm
by mac.doogle
Thanks guy's I'm finding there is more to these cuts than I thought. I am going to try both way's and the bluing you would think I would have thought of that part. Being a Millwright for 30 years I've gone through tons of that stuff.

Re: How to cut a mt2 taper

Posted: Sun Dec 18, 2011 8:08 am
by stevec
Mac, just make sure to choose a taper socket that permits ejection of your taper.
Just in case you get a little enthusiastic inserting your taper into the blued socket, heh, heh.
One would hate to be successful at machining the taper only to have it reside in your socket for eternity. :(