Welcome to the Lathe Forum!

All discussion about lathes including but not limited to: South Bend, Hardinge, Logan, Monarch, Clausing and other HSM lathes, including imports

Moderators: Harold_V, GlennW

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kc6uvm
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Joined: Tue Jan 16, 2007 11:34 pm
Location: Lancaster, CA

Re: Welcome to the Lathe Forum!

Post by kc6uvm » Thu Mar 23, 2017 10:52 pm

Been awhile since I posted in Chaski, but I'm back....

Acquired a Southbend 9C lathe last Fall and will be restoring it to operational condition. Judging by the serial number, it was built during the war. A previous owner painted it blue.

Created a heavy wood stand for it, set the lathe up on the table and will have to inspect the motor. I saw something I didn't like....

There will be pictures posted this weekend.
George J. Becker
Lancaster, CA (formerly of Shandon, CA)
Model railroading is fun but the work expands proportionately to the track gauge.

spro
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Location: mid atlantic

Re: Welcome to the Lathe Forum!

Post by spro » Fri Mar 24, 2017 12:10 am

Sounds cool. Welcome back!

spro
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Re: Welcome to the Lathe Forum!

Post by spro » Wed Apr 26, 2017 11:57 pm

I can't say what you "didn't like" but the underhead motors of the 9A are quite heavy. I can't see that motor positioned outside and the heavy pulleys. Then it went to flat belt and those were relatively heavy cone pulleys. So I don't see that happening without under drive.
Way back in the 1930's, with the South Bend 11" they changed so where an electrical motor could be used instead of line shaft drive. The motor is enormous and heavy and the cast structure to support it and the chain drive and flat pulleys weighed a lot! Sure it was stable with all that weight. We don't see many of these around anymore...But there was centrifugal balanced force to the spindle. I cannot more recommend that, after all this time, a flat-head engine but it did do the job.
Your 9 is different and what it needs is stable drive. You can't hang all this weight off of it now. One balanced flywheel will help and the newer options can work with it.

PROFG
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Joined: Sat Jul 21, 2018 6:28 pm

Re: Welcome to the Lathe Forum!

Post by PROFG » Sun Jul 22, 2018 5:27 am

Hello from a CT newbie. Searched here and online with no joy so please help if possible. Hoping to restore/use a SB 9A with little home use from new but very poor storage since about 1965 (I think). After an estimate of $2500 to grind ways and scrape/adjust all else I am shifting to finding good parts, or another lathe, to continue. Found a bare hardened bed and hope to see it today (last minute, I know) but can not find hands and eyes procedure for testing it. No head stock/tail stock / carriage, maybe sellers plan, so can compare under head stock area to near by for wear but not leveled / installed so no idea for twist. Understand hardened ways were ground so not scraped or flaked so harder to see wear. Considering above, if perfect, does $300 seem high? Any help on testing with readily available tools would be greatly appreciated. If restore started will document here if wanted. Thanks again.

Dick

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kc6uvm
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Location: Lancaster, CA

Re: Welcome to the Lathe Forum!

Post by kc6uvm » Sun Jul 22, 2018 1:49 pm

Welcome aboard PROFG /Dick. I have a SB 9C. Very basic lathe. Doesn't have all the zuzus and wam/wams the 9A comes with. Without photos, it's hard to make any sort of judgement call. When it comes to replacing and repairing machines, it's all in the eye of the beholder... Balancing costs of buying new, cost of repair/keeping the old machine, and then there are the tolerances and other little things that come into play making your decision...

In response to spro, the lathe was a few boxes of parts when it was brought home. The below photo is what I didn't like when I first set up the machine and examined the lathe:
KIMG0356.JPG
I found a more compact switch and connected the ground to the motor chassis.

The below wiring harness is what replaced the old wiring. A new motor start switch in series with a second switch mounted else where replaced the old switch on the motor's switch plate:
KIMG0374.JPG
I'm blogging about the lathe in another thread.
George J. Becker
Lancaster, CA (formerly of Shandon, CA)
Model railroading is fun but the work expands proportionately to the track gauge.

PROFG
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Joined: Sat Jul 21, 2018 6:28 pm

Re: Welcome to the Lathe Forum!

Post by PROFG » Thu Jul 26, 2018 2:18 pm

Hi all. My second post - to correct the first! Took a good look at lathe bequeathed to me which I recalled was a SB and from pictures thought a 9a. Boy am I embarrassed. It is a quick change 12" Craftsman in poorer shape than I remembered. Could post some pictures if members take dramamine before viewing (almost made me sick). I can stop looking for 9a parts now. Still tempted to find a running example while I resurrect this one. Just a quick question, probably of many to follow, should I derust, measure, mount the bed or just look for a clean one? Understand might have to scrape in everything mounted to replacement bed. It has had very little use so should not be worn anywhere. Thanks in advance for any guidance/help getting this back chipping.

Dick

Harold_V
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Re: Welcome to the Lathe Forum!

Post by Harold_V » Thu Jul 26, 2018 4:07 pm

You will likely get mixed suggestions in regards to your dilemma. Some do not agree with my philosophy.

That you talk about derusting the bed, to me, is troubling. Rust rarely occurs uniformly, and it is no better than wear. It can safely be assumed that a rusted machine is akin to a badly worn machine. When you derust, you will be removing metal that was once precision finished, which would account for a machine's ability to do work reliably. When you assemble this machine, it may or may not be capable.

Please note that I have not implied that the machine can't make chips. It most likely will---but you may have endless frustration trying to wring from the machine reliable work. I am not a fan of rusted machines for that reason.

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

PROFG
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Re: Welcome to the Lathe Forum!

Post by PROFG » Thu Jul 26, 2018 5:34 pm

Thanks Harold. I'm not a fan either, thats why I got sick. Found two running sisters to mine couple hours away for $600 or so. Tempted but for a little more I could get much bigger / better I think. Had even considered taking a scraping course since it has no v ways and very low "missing metal" wear. Have ordered a Starrett 98- 4 to survey the bed and use to check possible purchase of used. Guess I will degrease and derust and see how bad, then decide. Concerning the 98-4, if you want a laugh check this. Few weeks ago, before I knew what a 98-x looked like, I saw one at an estate sale, cheap, but held off because I thought someone could have tweaked it out of cal. Now I know how to CAL and am getting one from estate sale for twice as much. Oh well. Later.

Dick

earlgo
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Location: NE Ohio

Re: Welcome to the Lathe Forum!

Post by earlgo » Thu Jul 26, 2018 5:51 pm

The 12" Atlas/Craftsman I inherited from my dad was in poor shape due to worn ways and carriage, and gears and spindle, etc. I wasted a lot of time and spare parts on it and it runs OK but it is not a serious lathe anymore, if it ever was. One of our on-line friends here calls this model lathe a flexible flyer.
If I had the wherewithal I would never do this again. Pig, lipstick, sow's ear, silk purse, etc.
--earlgo
Deja Poo - The feeling you have seen all this crap before.

Harold_V
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Re: Welcome to the Lathe Forum!

Post by Harold_V » Fri Jul 27, 2018 1:22 am

Chuckle!
Well, pretty much what Earl said, but one must also consider that there may not be other options. A poor lathe is far better than no lathe, even if it has been rusted. It's hard for anyone to make a decision for the other guy, as he has no idea what his expectations might be. There are many who use a minimal machine and are quite content.

One comment, though. While a Starrett 98 is a nice level (I own a 98-6), it is not capable of discerning the type of condition you'd be looking for. On the positive side, if the machine is bad enough that it can, you should pass on that given machine.

Here's the deal. A Starrett 98 is capable of discerning .005" over 12", while a Starrett 199 (or equivalent) is capable of discerning .0005" over the same distance. You'd be looking for very small changes, which the 98 most likely could not detect.

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

PROFG
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Joined: Sat Jul 21, 2018 6:28 pm

Re: Welcome to the Lathe Forum!

Post by PROFG » Fri Jul 27, 2018 10:03 am

Thanks H
Am using phone to get in ball park, 98 for closer and looking for cheap .0002 for survey. Talked myself ouf of 24" camelback since ways only 6" outside. Most bare beds too far away to pick up and too costly to ship but who knows. Only reason to proceed with this one is sentimental but that is wearing off. Later.

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