Rebuilding(?) a worn out lathe.

All discussion about lathes including but not limited to: South Bend, Hardinge, Logan, Monarch, Clausing and other HSM lathes, including imports

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spro
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Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2006 11:04 pm
Location: mid atlantic

Re: Rebuilding(?) a worn out lathe.

Post by spro » Sat Jan 13, 2018 9:42 pm

I replaced the bull gear of an Atlas 12 X 36 about 20 years ago and sort of remember how it went. The wear in the pulley lock pin pocket was similar. I didn't know about Tig or way to build it up then. There were ways but the pulley sleeve bearing was worn too. It wasn't terrible but wasn't new either. The NOS bull gear was fitted with reasonable care and balanced pressure but it still had a slight wobble to it. I remember adjusting it delicately but was disappointed that even with some fit pressure , nice key, it was still out by .001s . I had measured the spindle run out and it was fine. Bearings were good and I removed the whole spindle again-Once. No matter how I say this, it seems to point to a bent spindle. Well anyway, the lathe got stolen before I got into it further.
It seems to me that a worn bushing inside the drive pulley causes erratic behavior to the drive pin socket. There is that special screw to lubricate that bushing/bearing and it may be one upon the other. You don't see these things when they are together but at direct drive through the pulley socket, the pin is wearing it out.

spro
Posts: 7058
Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2006 11:04 pm
Location: mid atlantic

Re: Rebuilding(?) a worn out lathe.

Post by spro » Sun Jan 14, 2018 8:13 am

The reason I replaced the bull gear was there were three teeth sheared off it. I was familiar with zinc aluminum alloy enough to know that I couldn't repair it. This is difficult to admit, even in retrospect, that a major crash had occurred. I had to replace sections of the fine/ power feed. The lathe looked perfect when I bought it lo those many years ago. It is possible a major crash happened before. I would tell you guys if I did it. I want you to know. I was working from the top down and seeing what I wanted to see.
People have no respect for those gears but they do mesh in place. When they are good they are very good.

kroll
Posts: 41
Joined: Fri Jun 20, 2014 6:10 am

Re: Rebuilding(?) a worn out lathe.

Post by kroll » Sun Jan 14, 2018 8:46 am

Thank you sir for responding,I love reading all your comments along with others here.I wish I had just a small part of the knowledge that is share on this forum.Maybe then I would not make some of the mistakes that I make.For me the lathe that I can only afford is the one's that need little or lot of TLC which is how I become an owner of couple Atlas which the first was more of a challenge which lead me to another.But even knowing that there was problems I gave it my best effort and turn both into machines that someone else like myself would enjoy using cause it was in their budget.Both I did take apart down to that last screw learning as I go but I was also somewhat lucky that parts were available.Both lathes were primer and painted with what I believe was the best paint that the local SW's sells.I sold both to help finance my next lathe but each one I told the buyers I will give them a week to check it out and if I don't hear back from them then its a closed deal.Now Harold I have a Delta 1964 11" lathe that for me is very HD which is what blind me from all the other problems that it has.More problems than what I may be able to over come,but I am going as far as I can on this lathe then push it to the back and wait for a donor lathe to pop up someplace that being parted out.Going to try to post pics of it on the forum again,to ask for some help locating parts other than parting this lathe out.I want to try to make it the best lathe that I can within my limited budget will allow.The bed itself looks good I just don't see any ware on these flamed harden ways,and the cabinet is in pretty good shape but that's about it.Yes sir when I first started out doing this I use the words and others "restored" cause I though that was what I did,not to mislead anyone but because I was clueless.But now I realize there is so much more that has to be done to a lathe to make it worthy to use the word restored.I don't use that word or try not to cause I just don't have the skills or the money.Like you were saying in one of your post the more we learn or know about lathe it just is not as good as it looks:)Able to see the flaws without test driving. I am so glad I found this website, so much to learn here just wish I would have started sooner in life.

spro
Posts: 7058
Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2006 11:04 pm
Location: mid atlantic

Re: Rebuilding(?) a worn out lathe.

Post by spro » Sun Jan 14, 2018 9:25 am

Please. You are fine. There are flat mechanical issues with so much, we border on certain people knowing more about one or the other. Fine preparation and great paint is one facet. There are jewels which need the "holdings" to be correct. Mr. H will set us straight on the logic when everyone is wandering.
There are many owners of the Delta Rockwell 11" lathe. There are many here , past or present with great memories.

Harold_V
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Location: Onalaska, WA USA

Re: Rebuilding(?) a worn out lathe.

Post by Harold_V » Mon Jan 15, 2018 2:26 am

I don't know what things may need replacing, but the fact that the bed is flame hardened is in your favor, as a hardened bed is much slower to wear. The negative aspect is that it may not display wear in the way you might expect, forming ridges, for example. Wear may be gentle, over a long area, so a visual examination may or may not disclose the degree of wear it may have sustained. You would expect the greatest amount of wear near the chuck, so that's where you should concentrate your efforts to determine the condition.

By all means, do continue to post, and include photos, which will help others identify your needs and wants. Do spend enough time with your photos, resizing them so they are not too large, both in display size and file size. That goes a long ways towards keeping the operation of the board sustainable.

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

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BadDog
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Re: Rebuilding(?) a worn out lathe.

Post by BadDog » Mon Jan 15, 2018 12:16 pm

Harold_V wrote:
Mon Jan 15, 2018 2:26 am
I don't know what things may need replacing, but the fact that the bed is flame hardened is in your favor, as a hardened bed is much slower to wear. The negative aspect is that it may not display wear in the way you might expect, forming ridges, for example. Wear may be gentle, over a long area, so a visual examination may or may not disclose the degree of wear it may have sustained. You would expect the greatest amount of wear near the chuck, so that's where you should concentrate your efforts to determine the condition.
Speaking of hardened ways and hidden wear, lathes with hardened ways tend to take most of their wear under the saddle on the near side toward the chuck.
Russ
Master Floor Sweeper

kroll
Posts: 41
Joined: Fri Jun 20, 2014 6:10 am

Re: Rebuilding(?) a worn out lathe.

Post by kroll » Tue Jan 16, 2018 11:16 am

Thanks guys,visually it looks good but I will lay a scale across it and see if I spot any low spots.Sorry spro I though this was a post for all to post problems about each lathe problems.I will start another thread

AllenH59
Posts: 365
Joined: Wed Mar 16, 2011 1:26 pm
Location: Prince George BC Canada

Re: Rebuilding(?) a worn out lathe.

Post by AllenH59 » Sat Jan 20, 2018 7:29 pm

great thread..

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