Rebuilding(?) a worn out lathe.

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spro
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Re: Rebuilding(?) a worn out lathe.

Postby spro » Thu Aug 10, 2017 10:43 pm

I have to break my fast, in order to agree with you. There are outside surfaces, which covered with paint, are never seen. You can READ the heavy hand held grinders and the work they did to smooth the castings. I have been astounded by the grinding imprints and the very same gullets attacked the same ways. I'm not saying strip all the paint off. Only that there was evidence of experience of the outside grinding. Each machine was unique by this. During the construction before the painting, some were absolute masters at grinding freehand to shape the rough castings.
I will always remember the reason for applying a thin coat of paint. You can still see the evidence of shape grinding and envision them twisting a large wheel into a corner And continue that attitude around a segment.

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BadDog
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Re: Rebuilding(?) a worn out lathe.

Postby BadDog » Thu Aug 10, 2017 11:03 pm

Yeah, I saw a Bridgeport being "refinished" and chemically stripped. Some of it looked more like they took a free hand cold saw to it rather than a grinder. Must have been some powerful beasts of grinders. Must have taken 2 gallons of bondo to make it look smooth again, but in the end it look better than new. Not for me. Thankfully the mill I'm currently trying to put back together still actually looks pretty nice, though I'm understanding more and more that whoever undertook rebuilding that head really shouldn't be allowed to work on a small brigs flathead lawnmower, much less a mill head. But at least he bought good parts even if he did crack/break a few cast pieces trying to complete the task.
Russ
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spro
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Re: Rebuilding(?) a worn out lathe.

Postby spro » Thu Aug 10, 2017 11:29 pm

Well Russ. All I can say is about earlier stuff and appreciate what I saw. The castings were beautiful after grinding and that's all for that.
Again correct about the head. Whole different deal. They come apart so easy.

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BadDog
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Re: Rebuilding(?) a worn out lathe.

Postby BadDog » Fri Aug 11, 2017 12:26 am

Sometimes in spite of my efforts to be descriptive, my words do not come off as intended, and I didn't mean to say that it was poorly done. The flashing and such from the casting process was well sculpted and not to be faulted by me. But it wasn't ground relatively smooth as I have done on various things with my assorted grinders, but rather very vigorously and aggressively leaving marks like claws. They were not messing around, which I would suppose is to be expected in such production. The shape and sculpting was nothing to complain about at all, but those grind marks were beyond anything I could duplicate even with my (to me) beast of a 9" grinder (metal cased heavy monster from times past). Mine is a polisher by comparison. My impression is that using those it might have been a bit like some silhouette artsy pieces I did for my daughter out of 16 ga free hand with a plasma cutter. There would be no room for mistakes, because a momentary mistake means material gone that won't readily be repaired, and more work for the finishers too. And there is a LOT of highly skilled work from raw casting to the smooth gracefully shaped machines we are used to. Even my little Pratt Whitney shows minor defects in the non-critical casting areas, and they were at the time among the very premium machine manufacturers. But those very coarse grind marks combined with pits and some minor voids, I saw pic of it in process and it was smeared with bondo like cake icing where every inch of surface needed filling (grinder, void, porous, etc), then sanded, rinse, repeat. And my memory for details like that is not great, but I want to say it was the main base casting for an old round ram M head? I just tried to refresh that memory with some google searching, but no dice.
Russ

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spro
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Re: Rebuilding(?) a worn out lathe.

Postby spro » Fri Aug 11, 2017 9:12 am

I really do appreciate and read. We are among others who think and notice these things. I suppose voids and minor errors are to be expected and everything painted over. I wouldn't waste our time, even mentioning it but you have seen it also. That is enough for me...for that.

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Re: Rebuilding(?) a worn out lathe.

Postby Downwindtracker2 » Fri Aug 11, 2017 12:02 pm

Even the bondo job has levels of finish. If you wander through a Grizzly showroom, there is a difference between a Grizzly and a South Bend bondo job. FWIW, the green bear should get applauded for trying to keep South Bend brand as better quality. One only has to look what has become of other quality brands, like Ridgid, now house brand of the big store.
A man of foolish pursuits, '91 BusyBee DF1224g lathe,'01 Advance RF-45 mill/drill,'68 Delta Toolmaker surface grinder,Miller250 mig,'83 8" Baldor grinder, plus sawdustmakers


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