vises ?

Discussion on all milling machines vertical & horizontal, including but not limited to Bridgeports, Hardinge, South Bend, Clausing, Van Norman, including imports.

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BadDog
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Re: vises ?

Postby BadDog » Thu Mar 16, 2017 3:03 pm

I would guess partly because of that last statement, and they are just a good quality hammer, though there are other very nice options as well. But I don't think the Nuplaflex has replaceable tips.

For mill work (and lots of other stuff) I do like the dead blow hammer bodies with replaceable tips, and there are a huge variety of tip options. And that includes all sorts of different plastic, rubber, brass, rawhide, etc. And they are easy enough to change as needed, though bodies in different sizes/weights are not that expensive. Just a good all around hammer, and I keep a Lixie (maybe 16 oz?) brass body dead blow with black and green tips on my mill at all times.

I've also been meaning to try the Trusty-Cook hammers, but haven't pulled the trigger yet. Small privately owned US based company with very good word of mouth.
https://trustycook.com/
No affiliation of course (don't even own one yet, but I will)
Russ
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spro
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Re: vises ?

Postby spro » Thu Mar 16, 2017 5:34 pm

No question about those but if we consider smaller lead hammers, we can go back to earlier designs. Boatwrights use hammers of dense hardwood heads and cabinet makers use mallets. These share a containment ring or rings of metal, to contain the face wood from "shrooming". A lead hammer can be made from an old brass bearing, hex or even re bar stock. Drill holes, fit the handle and pour molten lead thru the bearing.

Harold_V
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Re: vises ?

Postby Harold_V » Fri Mar 17, 2017 1:46 am

John Hasler wrote:Harold writes:
> Nothing comes close to the performance of Nupla-Flex.

What's special about it? I can find a million outfits selling them but no actual information.

I don't know that there's anything "special" about them, although they are made to do the job expected of them. What makes them so nice, in my book, is that the tips are readily available (so Bad Dog is wrong about tips not being replaceable). They are readily replaced by simply turning the tip counter-clockwise (right hand threads). A new, or different, tip can be installed in seconds, but if a guy has need for more than one type, each end of the hammer can hold a different tip. My small one is like that, with a green tip on one end and a red tip on the other. The red tip is softer.

If you're curious, here's a link that shows some of the tips: http://www.shoplet.com/Nupla-Hammer-Str ... 15158/spdv

The tips are available from several sources, including EBay, often for much better prices.

My "go to" hammer, 1½" diameter, is home made---a brass body, one I made when I got started in my apprenticeship at Sperry. That was back in '57, and I'm still using it today. I've had to replace the (wooden) handle once, and the brass body is beat all to hell, but I use it regularly and couldn't get by without it. I'm on my fourth set of tips, but my shop grew inactive back in '83 when I turned to refining precious metals for my livelihood. The hammer has experienced limited use since then.

I've used lead hammers, dead blow pink hammers, brass hammers, ball peen hammers and any kind of hammer you might think of, including body hammers, and none of them come close to the performance I expect, aside from the Nupla.

I have no personal interest in Nupla (no stock, or other financial involvement)---I'm just a VERY satisfied customer, happy to use and promote their hammer tips.

Harold
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

earlgo
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Re: vises ?

Postby earlgo » Fri Mar 17, 2017 9:30 am

Sears used to sell a Craftsman steel headed hammer with replaceable tips. Since you guys brought this up I remembered it, but it has been MIA for years. Probably the Kenmore dryer ate it along with my Disston Hand saw and fence stretcher.
C'est la guerre.
--earlgo

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BadDog
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Re: vises ?

Postby BadDog » Fri Mar 17, 2017 3:42 pm

That looks like the replacement tips on mine, which I thought recalled that was Nupla until I checked. Then I searched on "Nuplaflex hammer" and found these results in Google, with further searching within sources producing again and again the one piece heads (Amazon, Northern, Walmart, Travers, all from the same search). Which right or wrong lead to my comment.

Whatever the source or name, assuming good quality, I love the replaceable tip dead blow hammers, though I also regularly use the solid heads for bigger jobs (2-4 lb).
Russ

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Mr Ron
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Re: vises ?

Postby Mr Ron » Sat Mar 18, 2017 11:47 am

Harold_V wrote:
John Hasler wrote:Harold writes:
> Nothing comes close to the performance of Nupla-Flex.

My "go to" hammer, 1½" diameter, is home made---a brass body, one I made when I got started in my apprenticeship at Sperry. That was back in '57, and I'm still using it today. I've had to replace the (wooden) handle once, and the brass body is beat all to hell, but I use it regularly and couldn't get by without it. I'm on my fourth set of tips, but my shop grew inactive back in '83 when I turned to refining precious metals for my livelihood. The hammer has experienced limited use since then.
Harold

Harold; could you provide me with details of how you made your hammer? Should the interior be filled with lead or steel shot? I could use BB's as I can't find lead shot except in bulk amounts for reloaders.
Mr.Ron from South Mississippi

Harold_V
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Re: vises ?

Postby Harold_V » Sat Mar 18, 2017 3:44 pm

Ron,
My hammer was made from a piece of 1½" diameter brass. The resulting weight is sufficient, so adding shot or other heavy material wasn't required. For a heavier hammer, one might consider using larger diameter tips, or a longer head. It's a very simple, straight forward process. Hold the material in a chuck so it runs true, then bore the cavity for the tip, which I think is a 30° included angle. If that's not right, the angle is readily determined by measuring a new tip. The diameter of the taper should be such that when the tip is tight, the angle is fully engaged, and the tip bears on the shoulder as well as the bottom of the cavity. When the tip is fully supported, it won't self destruct in use. The tips are provided with a threaded stud, which varies in size according to tip diameter. Larger tips have larger threads, all of which are a familiar USS thread (national coarse) in size. Once the cavity is created, the tapped hole should be created, to fit the tip in question.

Rectangular hole for the handle was created with an end mill, sized to fit the handle I chose to use. You can ensure the handle doesn't slip by tapering the slot so the outside end is slightly larger than the opposing end. That is easily accomplished by tilting the head in the vise by a degree or two on each end. When wedges are installed, the handle is widened, preventing any movement.

Making the hammer is a nice project, and results in a tool that will be used regularly.

The tips appear to be made of various durometer hardness polyurethane. They hold up exceedingly well.

Harold
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

Mr Ron
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Re: vises ?

Postby Mr Ron » Wed Mar 22, 2017 3:37 pm

Harold_V wrote:Ron,
My hammer was made from a piece of 1½" diameter brass. The resulting weight is sufficient, so adding shot or other heavy material wasn't required. For a heavier hammer, one might consider using larger diameter tips, or a longer head. It's a very simple, straight forward process. Hold the material in a chuck so it runs true, then bore the cavity for the tip, which I think is a 30° included angle. If that's not right, the angle is readily determined by measuring a new tip. The diameter of the taper should be such that when the tip is tight, the angle is fully engaged, and the tip bears on the shoulder as well as the bottom of the cavity. When the tip is fully supported, it won't self destruct in use. The tips are provided with a threaded stud, which varies in size according to tip diameter. Larger tips have larger threads, all of which are a familiar USS thread (national coarse) in size. Once the cavity is created, the tapped hole should be created, to fit the tip in question.

Rectangular hole for the handle was created with an end mill, sized to fit the handle I chose to use. You can ensure the handle doesn't slip by tapering the slot so the outside end is slightly larger than the opposing end. That is easily accomplished by tilting the head in the vise by a degree or two on each end. When wedges are installed, the handle is widened, preventing any movement.

Making the hammer is a nice project, and results in a tool that will be used regularly.

The tips appear to be made of various durometer hardness polyurethane. They hold up exceedingly well.

Harold

Thank you Harold. I tried making a DB hammer from a piece of PVC pipe filled with BB's and capped with polyurethane tips. It ended up too big with not enough weight; so I went and bought a DB hammer (just an orange one). I didn't expect it to work all that well, but when I tried it out, I was surprised at how well it seats work in the vice. Little by little, I'm adding tools to my shop that I previously thought I could get by without. I have found that they are making a big difference in my work. I contribute that to this forum which has provided most valuable information and tips from "old timers"; information I can never get from any books. Thank you for your invaluable service to this group.
Mr.Ron from South Mississippi

shootnride
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Re: vises ?

Postby shootnride » Fri Jun 30, 2017 5:13 pm

On the subject of milling vises, it seems that I have read on several occasions that some of the folks with smaller milling machines have wanted one of the 4" Kurt vises. I just got an e-mail from this company ( http://www.lostcreekmachine.com ) that has a used one for sale. I have no idea if their asking price of $249.00 is good, bad or otherwise. Just thought I'd pass it along.

Ted
Some people raise the IQ of the room when they enter.........others when they leave.


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