My new mill

Discussion on all milling machines vertical & horizontal, including but not limited to Bridgeports, Hardinge, South Bend, Clausing, Van Norman, including imports.

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RSG
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My new mill

Post by RSG » Tue Aug 14, 2018 10:00 am

Hey all!

As we were discussing on Mr Ron's thread I recently purchased a new mill. I took position yesterday and put it in the shop without incident. I borrowed a friends 90' crane for an hour and hoisted it over the back fence making the job super easy. All I had to do was take the doors off the shop and cut one of the pillars that holds the awning.

Video of the crane
https://youtu.be/77OiiOgrYUI

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I have done nothing more than wire it to confirm it runs properly and otherwise left it as is with it covered in cosmoline. The finish of the mill is quite nice, I'm not seeing burrs and remnant pieces of castings like I have with some of the machines I have bought in the past. This machine looks like they took time to do a good job with the finish. I have yet to do any measurement work to see what it's accuracy is like but that will come in time.

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One thing I have found immediately is that the spindle is about 6" lower than the mll I just moved out. I could probably get used to that but after testing how far down I'd have to lower the knee for a few operations regarding drilling I can't tolerate that so I want to raise the mill up, even 4" would help.

So my question to you all is this: What is the proper method to elevate a milling machine? I was planning on using two 4" x 4" P/T beams, one at the front and one at the back. I'd lag screw them to the mill for security.

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I'd appreciate others suggestions......
Vision is not seeing things as they are, but as they will be.

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NP317
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Re: My new mill

Post by NP317 » Tue Aug 14, 2018 10:09 am

Too close to the wall, based on my own mistakes.
Just sayin'.

Looks like a great acquisition for your shop. Enjoy.
~RN

Bob D.
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Re: My new mill

Post by Bob D. » Tue Aug 14, 2018 10:31 am

I lag bolted 6"x6" timbers to the base of my Bridgeport to make the working height better for me. I think things are quieter with the mill off the concrete. Material storage underneath between the beams. Makes it really easy to pull the mill out of the corner. Easy to jack up and put a few pipes underneath. Works well for me.

Bob D.
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RSG
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Re: My new mill

Post by RSG » Tue Aug 14, 2018 2:03 pm

NP317 wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 10:09 am
Too close to the wall, based on my own mistakes.
Just sayin'.

Looks like a great acquisition for your shop. Enjoy.
~RN
Thanks for the thoughts NP317, can you please elaborate on your concerns of the machines location close to the wall? I don't have a lot of space but I'd like to hear your thoughts.
Vision is not seeing things as they are, but as they will be.

RSG
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Re: My new mill

Post by RSG » Tue Aug 14, 2018 2:05 pm

Bob D.

Thanks for the pic. 6" x 6" sounds like a better idea although I might be incline to cut them down a bit to maybe 4.5" or 5"
Vision is not seeing things as they are, but as they will be.

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Re: My new mill

Post by Harold_V » Tue Aug 14, 2018 3:59 pm

Placing a mill in a corner can cost you the ability to work long pieces. It also complicates accessing the turret, should you have need to move the ram.
Beyond that, I can't think of a less than acceptable reason for not taking advantage of a corner installation, especially if the work you do is job specific, known to be small, with little chance you'd be required to work on long pieces. That would be especially true for one with limited shop space.

Looks pretty nice!

H
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ctwo
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Re: My new mill

Post by ctwo » Tue Aug 14, 2018 4:40 pm

Yes nice clean looking mill. My first reaction was too close to the wall too. I put my BP in the corner too. Had to pull it out a bit to rotate the turret. I wanted to be able to have the ram extended and swing it around for a second head. I also have it by the roll-up door so I can open that side if I need to.

It always amazes me how high they swing things from a crane.

BTW, I would lag 4x4 or whatever suitable lumber, but oriented left-right with a bit of stickout on each side for stability. If you use 6x6 you could just notch for the foot and have them pushed further to the edges for a wider stance as well.
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NP317
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Re: My new mill

Post by NP317 » Tue Aug 14, 2018 8:54 pm

Corner mounting:
My mill has a long bed in the X axis (48"), so I need more room to not hit the walls.
Also, I like being able to clean behind the mill.
Type A personality...
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pete
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Re: My new mill

Post by pete » Tue Aug 14, 2018 9:45 pm

If it's worth doing then adding overkill and hydraulics just makes things easier. :-) Nice mill and that crane sure helped. It worked for you, and while I know real Bridgeports are designed to take it I'm not fully convinced the offshore mills are totally safe while lifting the whole machine from that ram mounted eye bolt. If it works then fine, but if the ram casting had just one hidden casting flaw under the paint or inclusion in that area then it could be an expensive and very bad day. Mine is supposed to weigh right around 1100 lbs. Yes it's a reduced size from the full sized mills, but not enough to make an 1100 lb difference. To me that say's there's a lot of reduced cross sections in the castings since the head weighs the same as the full sized one's do.

I made a point of checking the stability of mine by running the empty table to the stops both left and right. Then trying to rock the machine by pulling and pushing on the head. It's noticable the machine might not be all that far from being able to go over if the table was loaded with a standard 6" Kurt type vise and a heavy workpiece and the table extended to put that weight outside the Y axis slide. Since you want to lift the machine anyway then yeah I'd add a couple of 4"x 4"s that stick out at least 8" or more on each side and as mentioned lag bolt the machine down to those. I've not owned a full sized mill so there heavier castings and larger base footprint likely makes them a bit more stable than these slightly smaller one's are. While they make proper machine tool rubber adjustable feet that could be used I'm not a great believer in them since they don't make the machine any more stable like adding some extended wooden or steel 4"x4"s will.

Keeping the ram to the rear like you already have it does help a lot. Mine only gets moved when it would be impossible to reach where I want. That's pretty rare for what I do. Mines not in a corner although I could do that. I placed mine square to the wall behind it and in the center of the wall. A few times I have been glad I did so. That may not be an option for you. You may already know this. It took running into that knee crank handle end just once to teach me to reverse the crank on the shaft any time it's not being used. My shops small as well so I noticed your grinders position. Likely you have plans on moving it, but with my shop only having about 120 sq. ft. it's finally to the point I'm now packing my grinder outside any time it's going to be used for 5 minutes or more. It's frustrating and a true pita to do so, but it is what it is and sometimes there's no choice over what we'd like to rather do. If you've never run a back geared mill before? Make real sure the two gears are fully dropped into mesh by hand rotating the spindle back and forth until you hear the gear drop into place when you go into that back gear. If it's hard to rotate the spindle then there properly engaged. If you don't do that and they aren't engaged you'll know all about it the instant you hit the start button. Removing and switching the quill lock handle to the rear isn't a trick known by some. Placing it like that makes it tougher to use but it can't vibrate down and add drag to the quill. To the rear you then lift to tighten the quill lock.

Now the fun starts and it seems like the never ending wallet draining. I've got about twice as much into the tooling and dro than my mill cost. I could add just as much again if I could afford it.

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liveaboard
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Re: My new mill

Post by liveaboard » Wed Aug 15, 2018 3:05 am

You guys sure have clean workshops; my floor always has chips and shavings... I'm working on getting all the scrap bits and stock off the floor at least.

Borrowed a crane? Not that's a friend!
I like cranes + hoists + hydraulic things that lift.
I'm starting to accept the reality the I'll probably never own a mill.
[sniff]

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Bill Shields
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Re: My new mill

Post by Bill Shields » Wed Aug 15, 2018 6:23 am

I like setting my machinery on adjustable feet so that they can be set and kept level...and cleaned underneath.

Some base designs make this difficult.

Your crane picture reminds me of a friend who cut a hole in the roof of his house / some floor joists / ceiling drywall and set his mill directly into the basement.

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ctwo
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Re: My new mill

Post by ctwo » Wed Aug 15, 2018 9:21 am

pete wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 9:45 pm
It worked for you, and while I know real Bridgeports are designed to take it I'm not fully convinced the offshore mills are totally safe while lifting the whole machine from that ram mounted eye bolt.
I had not noticed that. I would not even lift my BP from those threads. I consider it only for lifting the ram and turret off the column.
Standards are so important that everyone must have their own...
To measure is to know - Lord Kelvin
Disclaimer: I'm just a guy with a few machines...

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