New to me Bridgeport clone!

Discussion on all milling machines vertical & horizontal, including but not limited to Bridgeports, Hardinge, South Bend, Clausing, Van Norman, including imports.

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whateg0
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New to me Bridgeport clone!

Post by whateg0 » Mon Apr 22, 2019 11:31 am

Next weekend I go pick up a Newport knee mill! I'm pretty excited to move up from my RF40 clone. That RF40 has been a stepping stone for a couple guys now. The guy I bought it from replaced it with a Bridgeport.

Anyway, I've read a few threads on moving and lifting the mill, and I don't think that'll be a problem. I generally strap things down on the trailer more thoroughly than the average guy. People complain regularly when I help them move stuff because "it'll be fine. we're just going a couple miles." Meanwhile, I'm running an extra strap just to be sure.

I do have a couple questions though. First, and of the least-most importance, what is the door on the side of the column for? I see it on all the machines, but never hear mention of it. Google didn't find much, either.

Second, I have read it's a good idea to support the head with the table while being moved. So, run the table up to the bottom of the retracted quill. I'd like to drop the table down, to help lower the CG. I know that each machine may be a little different, but what is the typical maximum distance between the bottom of the spindle and the top of the table?

Dave

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BadDog
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Re: New to me Bridgeport clone!

Post by BadDog » Mon Apr 22, 2019 12:14 pm

1) Anything you want to use it for. Some put collets in there, but chips can get thrown in from the dovetail channel above, so not ideal. Mine holds the crank handle for the quill down feed. Don't leave it on the drive or interrupted cuts can walk it off, and the bakelite will break hitting the ground.

2) Flip the head upside down. Place a scrap piece of board on the table and crank the table up until the board is snuggly captured. Low(er) CoG and head is supported. Thicker board, maybe small timber section, lower table. Turret spacers can make this a bit less functional. But I've seen them hauled many times, sometimes without even cranking down the knee, but that really depends more on how solid your restraints are. My take, do as I described for best safety margin.
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Bill Shields
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Re: New to me Bridgeport clone!

Post by Bill Shields » Mon Apr 22, 2019 12:50 pm

This probably won't surprise many of the people who know me, but....

I found that moving a full size mill of this type is easy inside of an (empty) dump truck.

The trucks have very stout sides and you can truss the mill at the top to the side of the truck at a height near to that of the mill...

what to do with the bottom?

Just weld some stout clips to the bed of the truck....and grind them off when finished (requires friendly truck owner)...

ain't nutting goin' nowhere.

Wish I had a picture of my full-size Bridgeport Series II being moved that way....

YES...you do need a crane to get it in and out..
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BadDog
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Re: New to me Bridgeport clone!

Post by BadDog » Mon Apr 22, 2019 1:11 pm

Actually, I've done that with a borrowed drop side dump truck using just a common forklift. With the modest downward slope of the straps, and heavy commercial 2" ratchet straps (the kind that use a bar), we didn't even weld the toe restraints. And I've hauled them on a wooden bed trailer. There I was using common consumer 2" ratchet straps with much less robust attachment points (D rings that normally restrained a 4 seat rock crawler buggy) and I did use screws to affix 2x4 scraps around the foot.
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Re: New to me Bridgeport clone!

Post by whateg0 » Mon Apr 22, 2019 2:21 pm

Bill Shields wrote:
Mon Apr 22, 2019 12:50 pm
This probably won't surprise many of the people who know me, but....

I found that moving a full size mill of this type is easy inside of an (empty) dump truck.
...
I don't doubt that it works very well. Certainly should. Unfortunately, I don't have at my disposal a dump truck. Also, it's a 300 mile drive, and frankly, a lot more comfy in my pickup than a dump truck, or Dad's grain truck.

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Re: New to me Bridgeport clone!

Post by whateg0 » Mon Apr 22, 2019 2:23 pm

BadDog wrote:
Mon Apr 22, 2019 12:14 pm
2) Flip the head upside down. Place a scrap piece of board on the table and crank the table up until the board is snuggly captured. Low(er) CoG and head is supported. Thicker board, maybe small timber section, lower table. Turret spacers can make this a bit less functional. But I've seen them hauled many times, sometimes without even cranking down the knee, but that really depends more on how solid your restraints are. My take, do as I described for best safety margin.
With the head flipped over, how much space is there between the upside down top of the motor and the lowered table? I know, it's probably not necessary, as I have seen people transport them with the knee raised, the head rightside up and no support under the spindle. I'm just not going to pull it 300 miles over Oklahoma roads that way.

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Bill Shields
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Re: New to me Bridgeport clone!

Post by Bill Shields » Mon Apr 22, 2019 2:25 pm

this dump truck had air cushion seats!!!!!

It was more comfortable than my ford van!

as a minimum, i would lay the head over 90 degrees....you are going to have to re-tram it no matter what....
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Re: New to me Bridgeport clone!

Post by BadDog » Mon Apr 22, 2019 2:51 pm

I don't really recall details, and it depends on the motor, but generally there is going to be room for a few 2x6 scrap pieces on the table and raised to support the motor. If I were hauling 300 miles, I would do the head flip and support. Across town, depending on details, maybe not. But no more work than it takes, there is always the proverbial "cheap insurance". And as stated, you wouldn't trust the alignment once delivered anyway...

When tilting (lowering or raising) the head beyond 20* or so, use your hand to help support the head. Otherwise it puts undue stress on the bronze gearing that is intended to aid in adjustment, not provide motive force. And of course tighten adjustment lock bolts before moving.
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whateg0
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Re: New to me Bridgeport clone!

Post by whateg0 » Mon Apr 22, 2019 3:08 pm

Thanks for the tip on supporting the head. I don't know what the motor looks like. It had a Bridgeport motor on it, but he's putting the original 3ph motor back on. It sounds like just taking a few 2x6 scraps will be sufficient.

I can put a whoopy cushion on my seat if that would substitute for air-ride.

Dave

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Re: New to me Bridgeport clone!

Post by pete » Mon Apr 22, 2019 7:56 pm

My BP clone was shipped from Taiwan with the whole head / motor angled with the end of the spindle pointing at about the 2 o'clock position and a plywood support on the table that the edge of the motor was resting on and taking the weight. What is important while moving them is to make sure the heads locking bolts, spindle clamp, X, Y and knee locks are tightened down. Road vibrations, potholes etc would have the screws bouncing around against the feed nuts without those bolts and locks well secured. The one other time I moved mine I just removed the motor and then the head to split up the weight for lifting. But whatever position you have the head in then as long as the table is taking most of it's head and motor weight that's likely the most important issue.

My mill no longer has that access door or the cast hinge ends in the side of the column. They just used a sheet metal cover screwed over the opening. Traditionally I believe the real BP's had or still have a couple of shelves for collet etc storage. But most of the reason that access door is there is for getting the spider inside and held in place while the columns top cap has the 4 bolts threaded into it. It also gives at least some limited access for a coolant pump and cleaning the sump if it's used for flood coolant. Mine still has a screened drain hole in the base beside and behind the casting that holds the Z axis nut.

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Re: New to me Bridgeport clone!

Post by Harold_V » Tue Apr 23, 2019 1:56 am

I've purchased two BP mills, new, in my many years. They are shipped with the head inverted, with a scrap of wood trapped between the motor and table.

H
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Re: New to me Bridgeport clone!

Post by platypus20 » Tue Apr 23, 2019 11:21 am

Harold_V wrote:
Tue Apr 23, 2019 1:56 am
I've purchased two BP mills, new, in my many years. They are shipped with the head inverted, with a scrap of wood trapped between the motor and table.

H
That how my 3 Jet mills came
jack

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