Vise Identification

Discussion on all milling machines vertical & horizontal, including but not limited to Bridgeports, Hardinge, South Bend, Clausing, Van Norman, including imports.

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Harold_V
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Re: Vise Identification

Post by Harold_V » Sat May 25, 2019 3:39 pm

Earlgo,
Thanks for posting your picture.
I'm familiar with machines with the trough, although my personal experiences came from larger machines (think K&T). What surprised me was that BP offered the troughs. They must be relatively scarce.

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

LIALLEGHENY
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Location: Bohemia, NY

Re: Vise Identification

Post by LIALLEGHENY » Sat May 25, 2019 9:52 pm

I have a vise identical to the one in the first post, but it has Bridgeport cast into it. My Series II Special Bridgeport has the half moon troughs in the table.

Nyle

earlgo
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Re: Vise Identification

Post by earlgo » Sun May 26, 2019 9:23 am

Harold: Moore tool co said that Producto bought Moore Tool in the 40's and all the old info was lost. They did say that the Producto machines made a lot of typewriter components.
Spro: Here is a better pic of the "Accu-Lock" vise that I think I got from Travers Tool. The coolant channel and exit weir can be seen much clearer.
QM16 ACCU-LOCK VISE CLOSEUP.jpg
QM16 ACCU-LOCK VISE
--earlgo
Before you do anything, you must do something else first. - Washington's principle.

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GlennW
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Re: Vise Identification

Post by GlennW » Sun May 26, 2019 8:37 pm

Harold_V wrote:
Sat May 25, 2019 3:36 pm
Any idea of the age of the one shown?
No idea, but I remember it being in a friends shop in the early '80's. It was then traded to another friend that traded it to me.
Glenn

Operating machines is perfectly safe......until you forget how dangerous it really is!

Harold_V
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Re: Vise Identification

Post by Harold_V » Mon May 27, 2019 2:00 am

LIALLEGHENY wrote:
Sat May 25, 2019 9:52 pm
My Series II Special Bridgeport has the half moon troughs in the table.
Thanks for that. I did a search and found a few images. Makes the mill look like an industrial rated machine. I also noticed that the heads have considerably more horsepower. A much more robust machine than the ones I've owned.

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

LIALLEGHENY
Posts: 171
Joined: Sat Jan 11, 2014 12:36 am
Location: Bohemia, NY

Re: Vise Identification

Post by LIALLEGHENY » Sat Jun 01, 2019 4:56 am

Harold,

Of the newer Bridgeport models.....Bridgeport made the Series 1, which is the standard 2 HP mill. They made the Series II which was the 4HP version with power feeds on all axis, a 40 taper spindle and a 58" long table. It has a much larger / taller base. The hand wheel for the x-axis is located diagonally from the saddle . I have the Series II Special which was the Series 1 head and ram, mounted to the Series II base. It has the 58" table but the hand wheel / power feed is on the end of the table like the Series 1 . It is a nice machine when you have taller parts , but small parts clamped to the table you can't reach even with the quill fully extended. I usually keep my Kurt vise with the swivel base on it which makes it usable for smaller parts. The other nuisance is having the handwheel on the end of the table...your constantly back and forth if your moving the table and trying to eyeball your position. It has about 33" of travel in the X ( which I believe is about the same as the newer Series 1 machines with the 48" table) but is has 15 " of travel in the Y which is quite handy. It also has air assist on the knee.

Nyle

Harold_V
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Joined: Fri Dec 20, 2002 11:02 pm
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Re: Vise Identification

Post by Harold_V » Sat Jun 01, 2019 2:59 pm

Thanks, Nyle. I've never explored the Series II BP's, so the information is welcome, and interesting.
The description you offered of the X axis handwheel was a feature on the Gorton 9J mills. The only negative I can think of is that the dials read backwards, so it was a little confusing if you weren't real familiar with the machine. That was due to the use of a set of bevel gears to connect the angular handle to the screw. I suspect that it would be second nature for the guy who was assigned to the machine, though. Much more convenient than having to walk to the end of the table to turn the handle.

I like the idea of a longer table travel. I've run numerous jobs (not commercial work---just home projects) where I've had to either move the part, or swivel the ram, so I could complete a long cut.

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

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