installing quil on mill drill

Discussion on all milling machines vertical & horizontal, including but not limited to Bridgeports, Hardinge, South Bend, Clausing, Van Norman, including imports.

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elewayne
Posts: 28
Joined: Fri Aug 29, 2014 4:10 pm
Location: Houston

Re: installing quil on mill drill

Post by elewayne » Thu Jan 23, 2020 6:50 pm

OK. I can see how that will work. Hopefully anyway , tomorrow probably. I have to clean the shop tomorrow for boy scouts coming in with my son to do something.

spro
Posts: 7871
Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2006 11:04 pm
Location: mid atlantic

Re: installing quil on mill drill

Post by spro » Thu Jan 23, 2020 9:34 pm

Find two washers which fit close around the shaft. The larger OD, the better. Find or acquire a bearing splitting tool- the type that clamps. Cut up a soda/ beer can as a sleeve around the shaft and insert it into the lathe chuck. There will be a small distance between the faces of the chuck jaws and the cast housing, to where the bearing splitter is assembled. These have two opposing wedge surfaces to extract things when tightened. You'll probably have to fiddle with it a bit and of course, unplug the lathe but that chuck isn't going leave marks that mar the surface like a bench vise.

elewayne
Posts: 28
Joined: Fri Aug 29, 2014 4:10 pm
Location: Houston

Re: installing quil on mill drill

Post by elewayne » Thu Jan 30, 2020 10:51 am

The project is snowballing for me.
1, the mill is screwed up somehow, to be determined.
2, The motor on my 1938 south Bend 9 has failed and just hums when I through the switch. I have another motor, but had go to get, and put on another pulley , old motor was 1/2" shaft the new motor is 5/8", then of course the belt won't fit. Two trips to get the right belt.

What would be the best way to bore out the old steel pulley to 5/8"? I was thinking the lathe, after I get the new motor wired in. Very small boring bar?

3. The press was given to me by the daughter of a guy who died. Turns out the jack on it is shot ( I hadn't tried to use it yet) so I went ahead and ordered an air powered one from HF. Not here yet.
So everything I need is down at the same time. Perfact

spro
Posts: 7871
Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2006 11:04 pm
Location: mid atlantic

Re: installing quil on mill drill

Post by spro » Thu Jan 30, 2020 1:15 pm

It does sound dreary. Your motor with the 1/2" dia shaft is probably newer than the 5/8" one. It sounds like some problem with the starting field. Centrifugal switch contacts often- but- this topic has been explained in detail here. Very well described when knowing what type motor. The steel pulley was probably right for the newer motors, so I wouldn't mess with it just yet. It will also be difficult, unless you are experienced, to bore this properly. It either has a keyway or screw holes which will influence the accuracy of a drill or boring bar. Really bad results.
How about getting another/ same type pulley with 5/8" bore? I'm sure folks here, would like to help if we had an accurate description of what you need. It is going to be okay.

Lewayne
Posts: 68
Joined: Sun Feb 03, 2019 4:02 pm

Re: installing quil on mill drill

Post by Lewayne » Thu Jan 30, 2020 4:36 pm

471E414C-1600-45CE-80C2-58BB2BE3C474.jpeg
The old motor and pulley.
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Lewayne
Posts: 68
Joined: Sun Feb 03, 2019 4:02 pm

Re: installing quil on mill drill

Post by Lewayne » Thu Jan 30, 2020 4:38 pm

I talked by a phone to a rewinding shop they said it would cost more to fix than a new motor.

Russ Hanscom
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Location: Farmington, NM

Re: installing quil on mill drill

Post by Russ Hanscom » Thu Jan 30, 2020 5:17 pm

Unless a motor is special as to features or sentimental value, it is normally quite cheaper to replace them than to repair.

spro
Posts: 7871
Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2006 11:04 pm
Location: mid atlantic

Re: installing quil on mill drill

Post by spro » Thu Jan 30, 2020 6:50 pm

Interesting Howell motor. Somebody here would be all over that, knowing more about it. I see it had a a two step pulley. If that is what works, don't try to modify it. Like Russ H said, newer used motors abound with 1/2" dia shafts. It is the question of frame mount and some fit better.

spro
Posts: 7871
Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2006 11:04 pm
Location: mid atlantic

Re: installing quil on mill drill

Post by spro » Mon Feb 03, 2020 10:24 am

Hi. Measure what you need and folks know.

Lewayne
Posts: 68
Joined: Sun Feb 03, 2019 4:02 pm

Re: installing quil on mill drill

Post by Lewayne » Wed Feb 05, 2020 12:20 pm

Ok, I got the press cleaned up and a new jack on it. First shot should be my set up to press the shaft out. Then the shaft out. It has two bearings and a spacer on it. I put it between centers and to the right of the bearings it reads about 3 thousands out. To the left of the bearings about 7 thousands out. Because if the gear I can’t get a reading near the center. But that hole in the gear end should be centered. It reads perfect on the other end.

But if I out the gear in my 3 jaw chuck, I know that has limitations, but the other end of the shaft reads about 45 thousands out. That’s the kind of wobble I’m seeing on the handwheel when it is turned.

So I guess I’d have to press the bearings off and try to get a better reading between centers???? And then find a location to press the bend out????? What’s my next step?

The hearing next to the gear is on a shoulder so the center of the bearing is hidden. How do I press the bearing off without damaging it? I’d be pressing on the outer ring or pulling on it with a puller.
I hate sounding this dumb but this hasn’t been my line of work. It’s all fairly new to me.
I know, I should have bought a better mill but I am learning from this one. If I can just get it working it’ll be fine for my purposes.
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elewayne
Posts: 28
Joined: Fri Aug 29, 2014 4:10 pm
Location: Houston

Re: installing quil on mill drill

Post by elewayne » Wed Feb 05, 2020 12:24 pm

Well. sorry. the photos came out in random order of course.

Harold_V
Posts: 18028
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Location: Onalaska, WA USA

Re: installing quil on mill drill

Post by Harold_V » Wed Feb 05, 2020 5:25 pm

elewayne wrote:
Wed Feb 05, 2020 12:24 pm
Well. sorry. the photos came out in random order of course.
The board software allows for placing the images in the desired order. To do so, one follows the instructions on the page on which the images get posted.
You will not be able to do that now, but you can keep that in mind for future postings where images are involved.

You most likely will not be able to remove the bearings without applying pressure to the outer races. However, with some luck, you may be able to straighten the shaft without doing so.

It is highly likely that the bend occurred in the proximity of the bearing. If you block at the solid portion between the bearings, making sure the load is not applied to the bearing, and at the high point on the end of the shaft, you could then press adjacent to the bearing, using a narrow piece of aluminum or copper, so the pressure is applied where needed. The aluminum or copper will ensure you do not damage the shaft.

Using a like setup on a flat surface, you should be able to detect the high point, where you'd apply the pressure to make the correction. The shaft can be marked accordingly, so when you transfer to the press, you know where contact should be made. It is important that you know where to press, and where to support, otherwise you'll introduce more error instead of make the required correction.

This entire process will be slow business, so unless you happen to hit it first try, expect to spend a little time on it. The thing that will help you the most is having a firm understanding of where the bend is, and where pressure should be applied. When pressing, you have to apply enough pressure to go beyond the yield point, otherwise the bend will remain when pressure is removed. That's where limiting blocking can save the day. It prevents going to far, and allows for control simply by altering the height of the limiting block. A variety of thin shims can be quite useful for this purpose.

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

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