Grinding wheels and HSS

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EdK
Posts: 688
Joined: Tue Apr 13, 2010 6:20 am
Location: Minnesota

Re: Grinding wheels and HSS

Post by EdK » Tue Jul 13, 2010 5:15 pm

Harold,

Thanks for the reply. I guess I'll just go ahead and use them and if they are not ideal, I'll start looking for a different grinder motor with the proper RPMs. In the mean time, once the wheels arrive and I've made the adapters, I'll just use them until the wheels get too small to be of practical use. I ordered Norton brand wheels since I don't like going cheap on stuff that's going to spin at high RPMs. I'll still give them the ring test prior to use but I feel more at ease knowing the manufacturer of the wheels is well respected in their field.

Thanks again. :)

Ed
Vectrax 14x40 lathe, Enco RF-45 clone mill, MillerMatic 180 MIG.

shootnride
Posts: 226
Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2012 12:31 am
Location: Sacramento, Ca.

Re: Grinding wheels and HSS

Post by shootnride » Sat Feb 16, 2013 2:10 pm

Harold_V wrote: Once it has been ascertained that the wheel is in good health, it should be mounted without a struggle on the arbor. If the wheel is a force fit, a risk of cracking is ever present, particularly when the flanges are tightened, so make sure the wheel fits properly, and can shoulder against the fixed flange (if so equipped) readily.
Harold,

I have started to look for a grinding wheel for grinding HSS and plan to purchase the wheel you gave as the example above (Norton 38A60H8VBE). One thing I've found when looking into these wheels is that some are designated as "with recess" or "without recess". What is the purpose of the recess and is there any advantage to one or the other.

Thank you,
Ted
Some people raise the IQ of the room when they enter.........others when they leave.

Harold_V
Posts: 17030
Joined: Fri Dec 20, 2002 11:02 pm
Location: Onalaska, WA USA

Re: Grinding wheels and HSS

Post by Harold_V » Sat Feb 16, 2013 4:17 pm

shootnride wrote:What is the purpose of the recess and is there any advantage to one or the other.
A recess is provided so wider wheels can be mounted on an arbor with limited wheel width capacity. I expect they are not offered with the recess if they're ½" thick, or less. As far as sharpening HSS goes, it's not common for one to need a wider wheel, although that may not be true for those who sharpen very large lathe tools or large diameter twist drills.

I recommend a ½" wide wheel for general tool grinding. Width for grinding a turning tool often isn't critical, but if you're grinding tools intended for internal work, there's a mandatory relief that must be ground behind the cutting edge (think grooving or threading tool). With a wide wheel, the relief area is often too wide, weakening the tool unnecessarily, often leading to chatter in the cut.

While it's true that a wheel can be dressed to reduce the surface width, that's a waste of the wheel, which is easily avoided by simply buying narrower wheels.

Harold
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

shootnride
Posts: 226
Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2012 12:31 am
Location: Sacramento, Ca.

Re: Grinding wheels and HSS

Post by shootnride » Sat Feb 16, 2013 8:58 pm

Harold_V wrote:
shootnride wrote:What is the purpose of the recess and is there any advantage to one or the other.
A recess is provided so wider wheels can be mounted on an arbor with limited wheel width capacity. I expect they are not offered with the recess if they're ½" thick, or less. As far as sharpening HSS goes, it's not common for one to need a wider wheel, although that may not be true for those who sharpen very large lathe tools or large diameter twist drills.

I recommend a ½" wide wheel for general tool grinding. Width for grinding a turning tool often isn't critical, but if you're grinding tools intended for internal work, there's a mandatory relief that must be ground behind the cutting edge (think grooving or threading tool). With a wide wheel, the relief area is often too wide, weakening the tool unnecessarily, often leading to chatter in the cut.

While it's true that a wheel can be dressed to reduce the surface width, that's a waste of the wheel, which is easily avoided by simply buying narrower wheels.

Harold
Thanks a lot Harold. You've fulfilled my personal requirement of learning at least one new thing every day.

Ted
Some people raise the IQ of the room when they enter.........others when they leave.

tmk13
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Dec 06, 2013 12:17 pm

Re:

Post by tmk13 » Fri Dec 06, 2013 6:47 pm

Harold_V wrote:
MikeC wrote:
Norton
37C24-52VK (AL)
That is the exact stick I recommend----if not one of the more economically priced imports.

Harold
Hello!

I know old thread! (learning a whole new game about wheels and dressing them correctly) thank you for this thread!

anyhow I cant find that stick anywhere, I did find norton sticks on MSCDIRECT just not with that number

I have found a 20 grit and 24 grit Silicon Carbide (they have more but those are in your recomendation), so which would be better 20 or 24?
http://www.mscdirect.com/product/97485510
http://www.mscdirect.com/product/97586960

again thank you!

Harold_V
Posts: 17030
Joined: Fri Dec 20, 2002 11:02 pm
Location: Onalaska, WA USA

Re: Grinding wheels and HSS

Post by Harold_V » Sat Dec 07, 2013 2:13 am

I might be inclined to go with the 24, although either of them will do a good job.

I'm all for buying things made in the US, but if you're on a tight budget, you should be able to procure an import for a lot less money. In either case you shouldn't be disappointed.

Just sayin'. :wink:

Harold
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

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