Building the Frisco 1522

Where users can chronicle their builds. Start one thread and continue to add on to it.

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LocoJerome
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2012 5:30 pm
Location: St. Louis, MO

Re: Building the Frisco 1522

Post by LocoJerome » Sun Jan 08, 2017 1:34 pm

The pilot truck axles are finished. I originally toyed with turning them and then hardening them and grinding them but in the end opted for a little easier path of buying case hardened 5/8" shafts already made to length (9 inches). I then turned a sleeve for the middle of the axle that contains the thrust bearings. This was turned out of 316 stainless that I had laying around. It was a little stringy but finished pretty nicely. The hub was initally drilled and reamed to 5/8" for a slide fit on the axle. The hub was then glued to the shaft with loctite. The shaft was then turned between centers for the remaining work on the hub.  A grease path was bored into the ends of the shaft that intersecting a cross drilled hole. The cross drilled hole was drilled with a carbide bit that was able to cut through the RH60 shafts. The hardened surface produced super sharp micro-needles that kept you from wiping them away with your finger... at least the second time. The grease tunnels were positioned under the needle bearings and the ends in the shafts were tapped to accept a set screw.
Attachments
DrillingAxleHardenedShaft.jpg
Using a carbide drill bit to cut through the case hardened shaft.
DrillingAxleGreaseHole.jpg
Finish drilling the cross hole through the non-hardened material with a standard bit.
BoringAxleHub.jpg
Boring the hubs to fit on the shaft.
TurningAxleThrustSurface.jpg
Turning the axle's hub to size and cutting the insets in the ends to accept the thrust bearings and races.
DrillingAxleEnd.jpg
Drilling the ends of the shafts for the grease paths.

LocoJerome
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2012 5:30 pm
Location: St. Louis, MO

Re: Building the Frisco 1522

Post by LocoJerome » Sun Jan 08, 2017 1:41 pm

Here are a couple photos of the final axle assemblies. The thrust bearing ride between hardened washers and the needle roller bearings are lightly pressed into the journals. The needle bearings are sealed on the outbound end. The idea is that grease injected into the ends of the axle will come up under the needle bearings, flow inward toward the thrust bearings and then upwards through the thrust bearings and finally exit the narrow gap that will exists between the shaft's hub and inner side of the journal.
Attachments
AxleAssembly.jpg
Overall axle assembly.
AxleAssemblyCloseUp.jpg
Close up showing bearings and surfaces.

LocoJerome
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2012 5:30 pm
Location: St. Louis, MO

Re: Building the Frisco 1522

Post by LocoJerome » Sun Jan 08, 2017 1:52 pm

Two leaf spring stacks are positioned between the equalizers in the pilot truck. The spring stacks were made using 0.52" spring stock from McMaster Carr. A full set of prototypical looking spring stacks turn out to be too stiff so I plan to replace every other leaf spring with a plastic strip to keep the looks and reduce the spring coeffecient. But I'm not going to worry about that until all the wheels and spring rigging is in place.

I cut the spring stock with an inexpensive bench plate shear from Grizzly. It worked quite well. However, drilling the material was a royal pain and I'll look to see if I can come up with a way to punch them when I have to do all the driver and trailing truck springs.
Attachments
CuttingLeafSprings.jpg
Cutting the leaf springs to length.
LeafSpringsInstalled.jpg
Leaf springs temporarily installed to check fit and function.

LocoJerome
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2012 5:30 pm
Location: St. Louis, MO

Re: Building the Frisco 1522

Post by LocoJerome » Sun Jan 08, 2017 2:12 pm

Since I'm catching up on my posts I'll share some non-pilot truck work. I mentioned in the past that the drivers on the 1522 are slightly different than what I was able to locate. Real Trains has some nice looking 21 spoke wheels that are pretty close but the counterweights are crescent shaped with a curved inner edge. The counterweights on the 1522 have straight edges on the hub side and instead of changing the area of the counter weight to vary the weight they instead changed the thickness. The main driver is a Scullin Disc and that I'll have to have custom make.

I purchased 6 drivers from Real Train with medium counter-weights and I planned to see if I could reshape the counterweight. I was concerned this would not work out too well but I have been pleasantly surprised in my progress. I first milled flat the backs of all the drivers so I could easily clamp them to the mill table. I then milled smooth the counterweights of 2 drivers flat to receive a 5/16" plate to build out the counterweight thickness. I plan to just tap the 5/16" plate and bolt the plate on the driver from the back side. I'll add some J-B weld between the drive and plate to fill in any gaps.

To shape the counter weight I used a ball end mill and 7 degree taper end mill to remove most of the counterweight material that needed to be removed. To get the final shape I used a couple different sized carbide burrs in a die grinder. The burrs actually cut better than I anticipated but it is still slow going. I have only finished three wheels at this point but it looks like it is going to work nicely. Here are some photos with a before and after shot so you can see what I'm trying to accomplish.
Attachments
DriveWheelMod2.jpg
Milling the counterweight surface for the two drivers to accept the plate to create a thicker counterweights.
DriveWheelMod1.jpg
Using a ball end mill to cut the straight edge of the counterweight.
DriveWheelModified.jpg
Before and after photo.

DJSteamer3017
Posts: 264
Joined: Tue Jul 12, 2011 2:07 am
Location: Downey, CA

Re: Building the Frisco 1522

Post by DJSteamer3017 » Wed Apr 05, 2017 4:31 pm

Any updates on your 4-8-2?
Attachments
IMG_0436.JPG
Technical Drawing on Frisco 1500
The 1" Scale Junkie ... But steam of all sizes is cool with me!!
"If you can dream it, you can do it" - Walt Disney

765nkp
Posts: 624
Joined: Sun May 06, 2007 9:24 pm
Location: st louis, mo

Re: Building the Frisco 1522

Post by 765nkp » Sat Apr 08, 2017 9:03 pm

I got to see the pilot truck today out at our track. Jerome is doing a great job, the pilot truck looks awesome.
Can't wait to see the rest of the engine.

Tim

LocoJerome
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2012 5:30 pm
Location: St. Louis, MO

Re: Building the Frisco 1522

Post by LocoJerome » Sun Jun 11, 2017 10:57 pm

Some photos of the complete pilot truck minus paint. It is amazing how much time one can see and roll it back and forth on two feet of track. Spent a few weeks working on some non-locomotive shop projects and finally hooked up the y axis of the DRO on the mill. It will come in handy soon. Work has begun on the frames.
Attachments
PilotTruckTop.jpg
Top View
PilotTruckBottom.jpg
Bottom View
PilotTruckAndFrisco.jpg
Frisco inspecting the work. And looking for hidden treats.
PilotTruckComplete.jpg
Sub assembly number one complete.

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Greg_Lewis
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Location: Fresno, CA

Re: Building the Frisco 1522

Post by Greg_Lewis » Sun Jun 11, 2017 11:17 pm

Well you're done with the lead truck but if you need to drill spring stock in the future, I've had success using a carbide spade drill, clamping the stock in a home-made fixture that includes a bar over the spring in which I drilled a hole to guide the drill. Still slow going but I got through all the springs for a 10-wheeler including mains, pilot truck and tender trucks and used only the one drill. I did sharpen it once.
Greg Lewis, Prop.
Eyeball Engineering — Home of non-interchangeable parts.
Our motto: "That looks about right."
Celebrating 30 years of turning perfectly good metal into bits of useless scrap.

LocoJerome
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2012 5:30 pm
Location: St. Louis, MO

Re: Building the Frisco 1522

Post by LocoJerome » Mon Jun 12, 2017 4:47 pm

Thanks for the suggestion Greg!

Did you drill each leaf separately? It looks like carbide spade bits are not designed for deep holes so I assume you didn't stack the leaf set and drill them in one pass.

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Greg_Lewis
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Location: Fresno, CA

Re: Building the Frisco 1522

Post by Greg_Lewis » Mon Jun 12, 2017 9:00 pm

LocoJerome wrote:Thanks for the suggestion Greg!

Did you drill each leaf separately? It looks like carbide spade bits are not designed for deep holes so I assume you didn't stack the leaf set and drill them in one pass.
Yes, one leaf at a time. It was a long process but it worked fine. No screw-ups (which is very unusual for me!). Here's a shot of the solid carbide bit (and you can see the chipped corner). The fixture is long gone but it was merely two pieces of flat stock screwed together to make a sandwich. One piece was milled with a slot just the right size to hold the flat stock between like it was a strip of bacon in the sandwich. Then a hole was drilled through both pieces to guide the drill. A five-minute project. (The fixture, that is. Drilling the spring leaves took much longer!)

And, of course, you know that carbide wants a very rigid setup; the drill quill can't have any slop in it and the chuck needs to run within a couple of thou true.
bit.2.jpg
Greg Lewis, Prop.
Eyeball Engineering — Home of non-interchangeable parts.
Our motto: "That looks about right."
Celebrating 30 years of turning perfectly good metal into bits of useless scrap.

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Dick_Morris
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Joined: Sat Jan 04, 2003 2:09 pm
Location: Anchorage, AK

Re: Building the Frisco 1522

Post by Dick_Morris » Tue Jun 13, 2017 6:31 am

I had better luck putting holes in .042 stock with a carbide spade drill than a punch. I drilled in the mill and didn't use a guide for the drill.

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DanSmo
Posts: 60
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2013 11:54 pm
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Re: Building the Frisco 1522

Post by DanSmo » Wed Jun 14, 2017 3:13 am

Beautiful work Jerome! I'm loving watching your updates, be sure keep them coming.

I'll second Greg with the carbide spade bits. I just finished up all my loco springs, if your interested look at the most recent post in the build log about my UP 4012.

I will add that rather than a spade bit and drilling one leaf at a time I chose to make a jig for each type of spring pack and stack drill using a straight flute carbide drill. That way I was able to get through 5 or 6 leaves before removing the drilled leaves and continuing to drill. The straight flutes do not clear the chips well but they do not trap them in the hole like the spade bits.
Attachments
D306_Stub_Straight_TiCN.jpg
D306_Tip.jpg
I just don't understand pronouncing solder as "sodder"... where did the L go?

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