90-Ton 2-8-2 Build, 1.5"/ft. Scale, 7.5" Gauge

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NP317
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90-Ton 2-8-2 Build, 1.5"/ft. Scale, 7.5" Gauge

Post by NP317 » Wed Jan 17, 2018 9:26 pm

I've got enough photos to get serious about posting recent progress on my 10-year construction of Polson Logging Co. (later Rayonier) Mikado #90, a typical Baldwin 90-ton logger.
I posted a "Tender Build" last April, so I'll reference that as a start here.

Latest subjects to post will include:
- Installing boiler insulation and jacketing;
- Constructing a detailed back-head cover;
- Back-head door used on oil fired locomotives;
- Oil can tray above the door.

Time for food right now, so I'll get busy with posting tomorrow.
Stay Warm, everyone!
~RN

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NP317
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Re: 90-Ton 2-8-2 Build, 1.5"/ft. Scale, 7.5" Gauge

Post by NP317 » Wed Jan 17, 2018 11:29 pm

I'm all fed up so here goes some hopefully useful info and pics.

A short history of Polson Logging Co. (Rainier) #90.
Delivered new from Baldwin Locomotive Works to Tacoma, Washington, in 1926:
PLCo#90, Tacoma1926 Adjusted.jpg
Note that this delivery picture proves once and for all that at least some logging steam locomotives WERE DELIVERED with white tires and and striping!
I've had arguments with others about this...

Of note: Polson and Rainier numbered their locomotives to represent their weight in tons. That allowed simple decisions of which locomotive to send up a logging branch with weight restrictions.
#90 work on the Olympic Peninsula on the west coast of the State her entire life.
Rayonier Corp purchased the Polson operation and kept #90 in service until 1968, renaming all the locomotives to Rayonier. There are video/films of the "handoff" celebration when #90 hauled the last steam logging train and turned it over to the new Baldwin Dismals.
Note: "Rayonier" name apparently comes from the Rayon thread, developed from wood fibers. Go figure.

#90 was eventually donated to the RR museum at Garibaldi, Oregon, and remains on display there in the Tillimook Bay area. I have visited #90 to take photos and measurements.
Rayonier #90 - 4.jpg

There are no plans to return her to operation at this time. The #1 drive axle was a substitute to allow #90 to be rolled to Garibaldi, and has smaller diameter tires than the other axles. The forward connecting rods were removed then, and still remain in storage, Along with other challenges. I guess that #90 was well worn out prior to shut down.
However, you can ride behind the restored sister #70, also returned to her original Polson Logging Co. livery, at the Mt. Rainier Scenic Railroad. I got to operate that steamer in the late 1970s. An absolute delight with stack talk like a shotgun! (She's saturated balanced slide valve operation.)

The model I am fabricating is based on the kit offered by now-closed Railroad Warehouse, in Mound House, Nevada.
Begun in 2007, I have previously fabricated the chassis, getting it running smoothly (fully hooked up) on 5 psi of air, over two years ago. Then all progress ceased due to a move, shop build, and medical Family challenges.
Here's where she's at today:
Loco+Tender 1 small.jpg
Here we go on the latest work:

Boiler insulation and jacketing:
First task was to make and weld steel bands (1/2" x 1/4") onto the steel boiler. The bands were split horizontally, facilitating access for accurate welding onto the boiler.
They are positioned based on the prototype location of the jacketing bands, from photos I have taken and located.
I also fabricated and welded on steel 1/4" x 3/8" spacers to support the domes, bell and other appliances.
1-Boiler Bands 1 sml.jpg
Next I cut insulation to fit the defined spaces around the boiler. I used 1/4" thick ceramic "felt-like" material, usually used on small furnaces.
Taped in place at the bottom, it held position for the jacket fabrication.
2-Boiler Insulation sml.jpg
On to the next posting...
Last edited by NP317 on Wed Jan 17, 2018 11:57 pm, edited 4 times in total.

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NP317
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Re: 90-Ton 2-8-2 Build, 1.5"/ft. Scale, 7.5" Gauge

Post by NP317 » Wed Jan 17, 2018 11:37 pm

Jacketing, Continued:

Next I cut, fabricated, and rolled the jacket materials using steel sheet metal, 24 Gauge, 0.024" thick. Used were 30" wide shears/rollers, hand cutters, drills, hole punches, power jig-saw, and nibblers to make all the slots, holes and openings.
The bands are 1/2" wide, with 90 degree angle brackets riveted to each end. One threaded side allows socket head bolts to easily pull the bands tight on the bottom, well securing the jacket in place.
3-Boiler Jacket parts sml.jpg
Next was to install and "fine tune" the fit:
4-Boiler jacket on sml.jpg
Then took it all off for painting, and reinstallation:
5-Boiler Jacket painted3 sml.jpg
I think it came out quite well. I used "Dupli-Color" automotive high temperature engine paint, available at automotive stores.
It's gloss black now, but I expect it will weather like my Ten Wheeler's paint has done.

Notes on sheet metal working.
I "bit the bullet" and purchased a 30" wide sheet metal Shear/Break/Roller, which made the work so much easier!
6-Sheet Metal Machine sml.jpg
After researching many available combo machines, I decided on the Harbor Freight suit, which was about 1/2 the price of the next available unit.
Close inspection showed that at least 5 of the machines I was looking at apparently use the same castings. After a careful several hours unpacking, cleaning, testing and adjusting the machine, it has served its purpose perfectly, with zero problems. I can recommend it for Hobby Work.

Next Subject:
Making a detailed boiler back-head cover.
~RN

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NP317
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Re: 90-Ton 2-8-2 Build, 1.5"/ft. Scale, 7.5" Gauge

Post by NP317 » Thu Jan 18, 2018 12:10 am

Paint note:
I carefully prepped and painted both inner and outer surfaces of the jacketing.
All the better to protect it from future rusting.
~RN

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makinsmoke
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Re: 90-Ton 2-8-2 Build, 1.5"/ft. Scale, 7.5" Gauge

Post by makinsmoke » Thu Jan 18, 2018 9:41 am

If I remember correctly Bill Gardieri built one of those Mikes and did a lot of documenting.

I'll try and find his link.

Thanks for documenting and posting!

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makinsmoke
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Re: 90-Ton 2-8-2 Build, 1.5"/ft. Scale, 7.5" Gauge

Post by makinsmoke » Thu Jan 18, 2018 9:44 am


Asteamhead
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Re: 90-Ton 2-8-2 Build, 1.5"/ft. Scale, 7.5" Gauge

Post by Asteamhead » Thu Jan 18, 2018 9:54 am

Hello NP317,
Thank you for posting your progress so clearly by means of both photos and helpful explanations! The fine result of a lot of precise work on just one page, hats off. That 'Duplicolour' automotve high temperature paint worked ot well with our locomotives, tool. In case you can continue your speed of progress your engine might run on steam in just two years flat :) .

Good luck!
Asteamhead

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NP317
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Re: 90-Ton 2-8-2 Build, 1.5"/ft. Scale, 7.5" Gauge

Post by NP317 » Thu Jan 18, 2018 11:16 am

Makinsmoke:
Thanks for the link to the Mikado built (Island Pond). I have referenced that blog during the construction of my loco and found it very helpful. I had lots of questions during the chassis construction. That locomotive is compressed air powered with a "fake" boiler. Still great to see, and they have the possibility of making it a steamer if they choose.

Asteamhead:
Thanks for your comments. Means a lot after seeing your work!
I admit to being amazed when the stainless steel rods were installed on the drivers and everything rolled freely with no binds! All those precisely machined parts worked together! Even the scale springing and equalization appear to function well.
Paint: I first used the Dupli-Color high temp paint on the smokebox of my Ten Wheeler. The "Cast Iron" color is the closest off-the-shelf paint I've found to classic "steam cylinder oil and graphite" we used to put on full sized logging locomotive smoke boxes. And it has survived the tests of time, still looking very realistic after 10 years of running. No flaking, cracking, or discoloring. Just nicely weathering.

And I DO hope to have this 2-8-2 under test steam this summer. Just not running in tracks yet. Now that my Wife and I are mostly recovered from 2017 trauma, life is returning to some sense of normal, and I can actually spend time in my new shop! With my new tools. Feels good.

More to follow shortly.
~Russ Noe`

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makinsmoke
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Re: 90-Ton 2-8-2 Build, 1.5"/ft. Scale, 7.5" Gauge

Post by makinsmoke » Thu Jan 18, 2018 11:49 am

Hi Russ,
More pics!

Was your ten wheeler the green one in Gene's catalog?

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NP317
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Re: 90-Ton 2-8-2 Build, 1.5"/ft. Scale, 7.5" Gauge

Post by NP317 » Thu Jan 18, 2018 12:24 pm

Nope. My Ten Wheeler is this one:
TM008.jpg
It's been a delight to build and operate.
~RN

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Re: 90-Ton 2-8-2 Build, 1.5"/ft. Scale, 7.5" Gauge

Post by Pontiacguy1 » Thu Jan 18, 2018 12:43 pm

The green 10-wheeler in Gene's catalog was built for Andy Morrison, who used to live in California, but now resides in East Tennessee near Chattanooga. He sold the engine a few years ago to Jon Pennington who is on the boards. It was a N.P. locomotive, green accents and a peachy-tan colored jacket, if I recall correctly. Sure was pretty. Maybe Jon will chime in with some more details.

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NP317
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Re: 90-Ton 2-8-2 Build, 1.5"/ft. Scale, 7.5" Gauge

Post by NP317 » Thu Jan 18, 2018 2:58 pm

Continuing:
Here's how I made a "fake" back head to cover the bland steel back head of the model boiler.

Here's the model boiler back head:
1-Backhead Blank sml.jpg
And here's the prototype back head:
2-Rayonier #90 backhead sml.jpg
I band-saw cut a sheet of copper, drilled the two holes for the thru-stays, and I then shaped it over the boiler back head.
I annealed/pounded the copper for three cycles, before I had the curves desired. Next I trimmed the curved portions for a uniform length.
Then I laid out the fire-door opening, and drilled/cut/bent four tabs forward to fit into the opening in the back head.

Next task was to mark punch the position of every rivet of the prototype onto the copper face.
First I made a color photo copy of the copper back head (left below), and printed scaled photos of the right side of the prototype.
The photos were taped over the back head photo copy which was then folded in half along the vertical center line.
Then I set the paper on a pine board and used a center punch to make every rivet location into the paper photo copy, but only on that right side. With the copy folded, locations were directly transferred to the left side, in perfect mirror image. That's the only way I could get accurate & symmetrical locations.

Next I taped that marked photo copy to the actual copper back head and used an automatic (hand) center punch to transfer the locations.
Result was a copper backed covered in center punch marks. Daunting? Not really.
Below is a pic showing the prototype picture, and photo copy of the copper plate, and the center punched plate.
3-Backhead Layout sml.jpg
Next was to drill any required holes for fittings, and then drill for every rivet.
There are three types of boiler rivets represented:
1- round-head rivets,
2- flexible stay bolt caps,
3- flush-headed welded firebox rivets, with center tell-tail holes.
5-Backhead staybolt details3 sml.jpg
For the round-head rivets, I used exactly that: 3/32" diameter round-head copper rivets, trimmed to the correct length and peened over on the reverse side.
For the flex-caps I used #4-40 screws through the sheet, and screwed into 1/4 brass acorn nuts.
To represent the flush rivets, I turned a simple steel tool for use in the drill press that had a recess with a center point to index into the center punch on the sheet.
By running the press at a medium speed, a simple press into the sheet left the desired marks, well representing those rivets.
6-Backhead Staybolt Tool sml.jpg
Continued in the next post. (5 picture limit...)
~RN

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