3/4" Scale J1e

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JBodenmann
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Location: Tehachapi, California

Re: 3/4" Scale J1e

Post by JBodenmann » Mon Oct 12, 2020 9:16 pm

Hello My Friends
Thanks Russ. These are simple techniques that we can all use. The only way to get a feel for this is to actually do it. The more you do the better. I have made many domes over the years using these methods. The very first one was a bit of a challenge, but it was also a lot of fun as I was learning. I had a wonderful mentor when I was younger. His name was Pierre. He used to build Bonneyville, and Muroc racers, hot rod model A's. He was a brilliant old cat. He built his own body's. We would sit and discuss sheet metal, machine shop things, and wood boat building. I wish he was still here. Sheet metal is wonderful stuff. Here is a bit more progress on the little sand dome. In the top photo the dome has been refined and has a more correct arch across the top. It still needs a bit of bumping. Then the dome pattern was stuffed in the dome so it could be firmly clamped in the milling machine vise. This was to cut the openings for the filler hatches. The third photo shows the set up for soft soldering the dome to the base. The dome was buttered up with No Corrode flux. Then the dome was tinned with acid core solder. Putting quite a bit on the side lower edge of the dome. A large soldering iron was used. Then the base plate was fluxed and the dome was gently clamped down with the set up shown. The whole mess was evenly heated and the solder slurped between the two parts just as slick as you please. In the last photo the dome has been well cleaned with industrial de greaser, and then Ospho. I don't know why they call it No Corrode as it will rust steel like crazy if you don't get it all off. Then it was brightened up a bit with a scotch write wheel. Now to make some filler hatches and stick some grab irons on.Too much fun!
Jack
Attachments
Dome200.jpg
Dome203.jpg
Dome205.jpg
Dome210.jpg

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JBodenmann
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Re: 3/4" Scale J1e

Post by JBodenmann » Tue Oct 13, 2020 9:33 pm

Hello My Friends
Here is bit more concerning the sand dome. The sand dome lids consisted of a rim-lip casting that was welded to the sand dome and then the lid that fitted in it. For both, the turn, machine, slice and dice-silver solder method was used. First the ends of the rim casting were turned from 9/16" round brass and parted off. These were cut in half with a .020" slitting saw. Then the straight center parts were made. The parts are laid out in photo 3, and then silver soldered together in number 4.
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JBodenmann
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Re: 3/4" Scale J1e

Post by JBodenmann » Tue Oct 13, 2020 9:56 pm

Then the center was cut out using a brand new 7/16" end mill. Now as the center was mostly removed, about .010" was left at the bottom to keep the delicate part from collapsing and being carried away by the end mill due to the force of the vise. The part is .125" thick so the cut was only .115" deep. It was then taken over to the disc sander and the last .010" was sanded away. And we now have our little trim pieces for the holes in the sand dome. In photos 3 and 4 we have the whole mess stuck together. The trim piece was soft soldered to the dome and a little chain was fitted up to keep the lids from getting dropped and braining the guy cleaning the rods. To make the lids, the same routine as the trim pieces was used except the center wasn't hacked out. The top was filed a little to give it a gentle curve and the lifting handles were fitted up. Some grab iron castings were stuck on with #00-90 brass model bolts. There are still a few small blemishes in the dome but nothing some primer and sand paper won't hide. The J1e's had a cool casing for the sanders that fit the contour of the boiler. They each had sliding doors for access to the sanders and feed pipes. Each casing had two large sliding doors toward the bottom, and one small slider toward the top. Each had a hasp, hook, and chain. More little baloney!
Happy Model Building
Jack
Attachments
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SteveM
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Re: 3/4" Scale J1e

Post by SteveM » Tue Oct 13, 2020 10:03 pm

Where do you get 3/4" scale sand to go in it?

Again, fabulous work!

Steve

Pontiacguy1
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Re: 3/4" Scale J1e

Post by Pontiacguy1 » Wed Oct 14, 2020 7:34 am

Gorgeous work! I remember that Barry Hague used to use beach sand in his sanders. He told me he would get a few scoops of beach sand, then lay it out so that it could dry out completely, then sift it to make sure that there was nothing big in there to clog things up. Said that worked better for him than anything else he tried.

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JBodenmann
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Re: 3/4" Scale J1e

Post by JBodenmann » Wed Oct 14, 2020 11:40 am

Hello My Friends
I have plenty of 3/4" scale sand, its called dust... :D Actually the sand dome will not be functional, no sand. Yes Barry used beach sand. The sand on the beach there was very fine, almost dust. Barry's sanders worked very good. But then all of his products were excellent.
Jack

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JohnHudak
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Re: 3/4" Scale J1e

Post by JohnHudak » Sat Oct 17, 2020 7:42 am

Jack, Beautiful work as usual... I look forward to seeing your posts, it seems like I always learn something..! One question, how did you solder the three pieces of the rim casting together, were they soldered right there on that fire brick? Whenever I try to do that, it seems that it takes forever for the pieces to heat up. The brick takes most of the heat away from the parts, and then the flux boils away after a while.. I know that there are fire bricks and insulating bricks, but what I'm using looks exactly like what you have.. I end up having to raise the parts up off the surface of the brick to be able to get them hot enough, then at that point they're no longer "flat".. Any advice?

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Greg_Lewis
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Re: 3/4" Scale J1e

Post by Greg_Lewis » Sat Oct 17, 2020 9:32 am

John:
Be sure to use the black flux. It stays active much longer than the white.
Greg Lewis, Prop.
Eyeball Engineering — Home of the dull toolbit.
Our motto: "That looks about right."
Celebrating 30 years of turning perfectly good metal into bits of useless scrap.

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JBodenmann
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Re: 3/4" Scale J1e

Post by JBodenmann » Sat Oct 17, 2020 10:08 am

Hello My Friends
Thank you John. I have a couple different types of fire brick. One is about half an inch thick and has a very smooth surface. This is what was used to solder the trim pieces on. I also have some that is the size and shape of regular red construction brick, it has a fairly rough surface. Both have been used to silver solder on and have not caused any problems by drawing off the heat. Both seem to work just fine. The fire brick I have is the type used in a ceramics kiln. For larger parts the oxygen acetylene torch is used. For these parts a Bernzomatic torch was used. I have never used black flux but as it has been suggested several times here I plan on giving it a try. Hope this helps.
Jack

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Greg_Lewis
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Re: 3/4" Scale J1e

Post by Greg_Lewis » Sat Oct 17, 2020 5:48 pm

By the way, Jack mentions using an oxy/acetylene torch. Many folks advise against this but it works when done properly. For anyone not familiar with this, the trick is to set a long feather on the flame and heat the part slowly, preferably away from where you plan to solder, letting the metal heat up to melt the solder. You do not want to use it the way you'd use it for o/a welding.
Greg Lewis, Prop.
Eyeball Engineering — Home of the dull toolbit.
Our motto: "That looks about right."
Celebrating 30 years of turning perfectly good metal into bits of useless scrap.

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JBodenmann
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Joined: Sun Oct 26, 2003 1:37 pm
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Re: 3/4" Scale J1e

Post by JBodenmann » Tue Oct 20, 2020 9:42 am

Hello My Friends
Now that the dome is finished up it's time to start the sander casings. These enclosed the sanders and prevented them from freezing. First a die was made up to form the curved lip on the side that will fit against the boiler. 3/16" aluminum was use for the die and .020" brass was used for the sides. A card stock pattern was made to fit the boiler and dome contour and then transferred to the die and work piece. There will be two sliding doors fitted to each casing, a large one towards the lower edge and a small one towards the upper edge. There will be a tiny hasp and clip with a hook and chain to hold each door closed.
More to come.
Jack
Attachments
Casing1.jpg
Casing2.jpg
Casing3.jpg
Casing4.jpg
Casing5.jpg

Steam Engine Dan
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Re: 3/4" Scale J1e

Post by Steam Engine Dan » Wed Oct 21, 2020 7:38 am

great work with the sand dome lids jack, even ours doesn't have those. but really, great job. this is gonna be an awesome engine when it's done.

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