Maine Forest & Logging Museum

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Tharper
Posts: 30
Joined: Mon Jan 23, 2012 8:51 pm

Maine Forest & Logging Museum

Post by Tharper » Fri Jan 05, 2018 10:44 pm

The Maine Forest & Logging Museum is one of those hidden gems that those who know about it treasure.
Located in Bradley, Maine, just north of Bangor, the Museum hosts three major events per year. In addition to early logging equipment, sawmills, etc. the museums operates a Steam Lombard Log Hauler at all the museums major events. There is also the wonderful belt driven Grady Machine shop which is in operation as well.
DSC_4605.JPG
The museum also has on loan a10 ton a gasoline powered Lombard Log Hauler which operates at events as well.
Below is a video taken during the museum's "Living History Days event" and some others for your enjoyment.






If you find yourself in Maine be sure to stop by!

http://www.maineforestandloggingmuseum.org/

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LVRR2095
Posts: 1334
Joined: Sun Mar 04, 2007 6:50 pm
Location: Maine, USA

Re: Maine Forest & Logging Museum

Post by LVRR2095 » Sat Jan 06, 2018 11:50 am

The Maine Forest and Logging Museum is a fine little museum.
The volunteers are friendly and always happy to show you around and even demonstrate the belt driven machine shop.
While I live in Maine, it is a two plus hour drive for me to get there. If it were closer I would volunteer there. When I was there they had two steam Lombards in the shop.

Keith

Tharper
Posts: 30
Joined: Mon Jan 23, 2012 8:51 pm

Re: Maine Forest & Logging Museum

Post by Tharper » Sat Jan 06, 2018 12:11 pm

Hello Keith,

It is fine indeed! We still have two steam Lombards - one operational the other is static. Though it's fully operable we do not to respect the liability concerns of the family that loaned it to us.

I understand the distance issue! I drive down from Fort Fairfield to work on the Lombard crew. I am on the road at 4:00 am so I can
be there at 7:00 am to pull the steam Lombard out. We use to run it out of the shed on air but now the Gasoline Lombard makes life so much simpler.

It takes us about four hours to get steam-up and to prep it - fill the wood box and tank (450 gallons) and boiler and hit at least a bazillion grease and oil points. Though we have three major events the largest is our Living History Days in October. This past event we had over 200 reenactors and volunteers.
Lombards in Machinery Hall.jpg
This last event we also had Chris Reuby's amazing live steam Lombard
DSC_6031.JPG
We are always looking for more volunteers!

Bob D.
Posts: 205
Joined: Thu Jun 21, 2012 10:43 pm
Location: Saco, ME. USA

Re: Maine Forest & Logging Museum

Post by Bob D. » Mon Jan 08, 2018 1:22 pm

Terry,
Did one of the Steam Lombards come from the Harry Crooker family? I saw it when I was a kid in Brunswick back when I believe Crooker first acquired it.

Thanks,
Bob D.

Still taking care of your old 4 cylinder Wisconsin, runs great!
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Tharper
Posts: 30
Joined: Mon Jan 23, 2012 8:51 pm

Re: Maine Forest & Logging Museum

Post by Tharper » Mon Jan 08, 2018 5:02 pm

Hello Bob,

That's great to hear. I knew with a little TCL that it would be a great little engine.

Yes, one of the steam Lombards is on loan from the Crooker family. It was abandoned at Fish River Lake and eventually recovered
by George Mulhern back in the late 60's before Crooker acquired it and restored it.

Its operational but out of liability concerns of the family we do not operate it. The other Steam Lombard was salvaged
from Knowles Brook on the upper St. John river by Bert Packard. It eventually found its way to the museum in the 1980's
and restoration was finished in 2014 - its a sweet running machine.

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