Woodinville Shops

Discuss park gauge trains and large scale miniature railways having track gauges from 8" to 24" gauge and designed at scales of 2" to the foot or greater - whether modeled for personal use, or purpose built for amusement park operation or private railroading.

Moderators: Glenn Brooks, Harold_V

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Topics may include: antique park gauge train restoration, preservation, and history; building new grand scale equipment from scratch; large scale miniature railway construction, maintenance, and safe operation; fallen flags; track, gauge, and equipment standards; grand scale vendor offerings; and, compiling an on-line motive power roster.
Pontiacguy1
Posts: 936
Joined: Thu Apr 26, 2012 10:15 am
Location: Tennessee, USA

Re: Woodinville Shops

Post by Pontiacguy1 » Thu Jun 06, 2019 3:24 pm

I also use an FR rated shirt that I picked up from somewhere instead of the jacket a lot of times. Either one will work good. Look on the ebay, you can get one for about $13. Just don't use fabric softener on them as it will begin to strip away the treatment they do to make them fire resistant. Just a good wash in cold water with a typical detergent, then hang to dry, or partially dry in the drier and then hang dry to finish it. That's what our uniform people taught us with our FR rated stuff.

I also leave the FR shirt un-tucked so that something doesn't drip or fly down into my pants pocket.

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NP317
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Location: Northern Oregon

Re: Woodinville Shops

Post by NP317 » Thu Jun 06, 2019 8:43 pm


Glenn Brooks
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Joined: Mon Nov 10, 2014 1:39 pm
Location: Woodinville, Washington

Re: Woodinville Shops

Post by Glenn Brooks » Fri Jun 07, 2019 12:07 am

Hey Russ,

Great Jacket! This is exactly what I have. I just had it restitched and replaced some snaps, because it’s so old and well worn.

Would you believe the Great BonFire was the one time I didn’t wear it! True,

Anyways thanks for finding that link. Good welding jacket is essential

Glenn
Moderator - Grand Scale Forum

Motive power : 1902 A.S.Campbell 4-4-0 American - 12 5/8" gauge, 1955 Ottaway 4-4-0 American 12" gauge

Ahaha, Retirement: the good life - drifting endlessly on a Sea of projects....

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NP317
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Location: Northern Oregon

Re: Woodinville Shops

Post by NP317 » Fri Jun 07, 2019 11:11 am

You're welcome.
Jacket on; Flames out.
((-;
Russ

Glenn Brooks
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Joined: Mon Nov 10, 2014 1:39 pm
Location: Woodinville, Washington

Re: Woodinville Shops

Post by Glenn Brooks » Sat Jun 08, 2019 1:26 am

Back on track with the flat car build.

Last couple of days made up the top and bottom plates for the draft gear- coupler pockets actually. But the couplers have spring buffers bolted to the back of the coupler pocket. so I guess they are technically draft gear.

Also finalized design for the main bearings - pin and pocket assemblies that will hold the trucks to the frames, and started turning the top and bottom parts.
4AE24C0F-A1C5-4011-8CC1-5E1D5DBE43A9.jpeg

The above shows the 15/16” bolt that will extend from my experimental bolster (3/8” flat bar) piece down through the main bearing assembly and snug up the truck. Used my wonderful, new-to-me boring bar, on the mill, to ream the hole in a sample of the bolster plate. Decided to make an experimental prototype scale bearing assembly to see if my design will work properly - before welding all these untried parts together.
F55469A1-6CE8-463E-BF40-D18E2227F434.jpeg
This “safety” pin will be encased by a 3” pin and receptacle assembly, molded on an 1870’s prototype car design. This results in a pin permanently attached to the upper frame bolster, that nestles into a 4” OD round female center pocket mounted on the truck. I think I will make up a 3/8” HD plastic thrust bearing to sit between the upper pin and lower receptical. Now, in real life, these things were all held together by gravity. The rolling stock all weighed many tons and sat on the trucks with great weight. So, allowing for the physics of miniaturized railroading, I’ve put the safety pin down through the center of my upper and lower bearing design, to make sure the truck and frame stay together. The idea is, no embarrassing moments where a car load of people bounces down the track with no truck underneath.

Gotta take some better photos tomorrow.

Glenn
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Moderator - Grand Scale Forum

Motive power : 1902 A.S.Campbell 4-4-0 American - 12 5/8" gauge, 1955 Ottaway 4-4-0 American 12" gauge

Ahaha, Retirement: the good life - drifting endlessly on a Sea of projects....

Glenn Brooks
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Joined: Mon Nov 10, 2014 1:39 pm
Location: Woodinville, Washington

Re: Woodinville Sho

Post by Glenn Brooks » Sat Jun 08, 2019 7:24 pm

More progress on the bearing.

Finished turning the male side of the socket. Here it is, resting on the upside down frame. The bolster will be a full length piece of 3/8 x 4” flat bar, across the frame, welded to each sill. The male pin and retaining pin will be welded to a separate baseplate, similar to the example shown in the photo- only longer, with bolt hole pattern drilled.
CA55B716-D19D-4539-BAF6-9C9B309D0910.jpeg
Here Are the component parts, in order of assembly.
A0721CFB-C79A-45A6-BB16-86B31C939B70.jpeg
The receptacle is just a length of 4” OD steel pipe, sawn and turned to proper height. This pipe bit and the male top part will be welded to backing plates, then bolted onto the bolsters and trucks. If the whole thing proves to be a bust, I can unbolt and replace without doing major surgery to the trucks.
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Another view:
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Sitting on top of the truck. Thinking about adding a thrust bearing or HDPE washer to the bottom of the receptacle to ease the rotational movement... any suggestions?
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I think it will work out just fine!

On another note, after turning the 3” outer male pin, I couldn’t part it off from the stub to save my soul. Junk yard steel work hardened to quickly and wore out my patience. Couldn’t hold it in the bandsaw, so tack welded it to a long piece of round stock and clamped that in the bandsaw. Danced a jig the whole time it was sawn in two! One final facing cut and all done.
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The hobby gets more fun every day!

Glenn
Moderator - Grand Scale Forum

Motive power : 1902 A.S.Campbell 4-4-0 American - 12 5/8" gauge, 1955 Ottaway 4-4-0 American 12" gauge

Ahaha, Retirement: the good life - drifting endlessly on a Sea of projects....

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NP317
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Location: Northern Oregon

Re: Woodinville Shops

Post by NP317 » Sat Jun 08, 2019 9:53 pm

I vote for a bearing washer of thin HDPE.
~RN

LIALLEGHENY
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Location: Bohemia, NY

Re: Woodinville Shops

Post by LIALLEGHENY » Sun Jun 09, 2019 1:00 am

Glenn,

A little quick research on compressive strength of plastics indicates an acetal copolymer (glass filled preferred) or a polyamide-imide plastic such as Torlon would be a much better choice than HDPE which is rather low in the compression chart. Delrin (glass filled) would also be a good choice and is readily available from McMaster Carr.

Nyle

Glenn Brooks
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Location: Woodinville, Washington

Re: Woodinville Shops

Post by Glenn Brooks » Sun Jun 09, 2019 2:45 am

Thanks Nyle, I think a couple of local metal working shops work a lot with Delrin. I’ll ask about and see if I can score a sample. Appreciate the info- I am not very knowledgeable about plastics...

Glenn
Moderator - Grand Scale Forum

Motive power : 1902 A.S.Campbell 4-4-0 American - 12 5/8" gauge, 1955 Ottaway 4-4-0 American 12" gauge

Ahaha, Retirement: the good life - drifting endlessly on a Sea of projects....

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NP317
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Location: Northern Oregon

Re: Woodinville Shops

Post by NP317 » Sun Jun 09, 2019 10:40 am

Better plastic ideas. Good.
RN

Glenn Brooks
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Location: Woodinville, Washington

Re: Woodinville Shops

Post by Glenn Brooks » Sun Jun 09, 2019 10:03 pm

Got a piece of Hi Def Plastic to experiment making plastic thrust washers. Not sure if it is Delrin or lower grade HDFE. The scrap piece was formerly a bit of Boeing aircraft flooring - so high quality material, I am sure. machined up 4 thrust washers for the main bearing. Not much to see except a large pile of white chips on the lathe and mill. So no pics.

FYIW, as a quick follow up, I did want to mention this stuff was extremely difficult to hold down, and mill. All due to slipperiness and flexibility of the material. It turns very cleanly in the lathe. Good sharp bit and you get a smooth finish. However, it was almost impossible, indeed it was impossible, to mill the surface of the disks in a vise. The tool pressure would invariably squirt he work out the side of the vise, or pop up out of the jaws. It’s very slippery and flexible material... a real chore to hang on to.

eventually came up with 2 usable disks, using very light DOC and sloow feeds to mill the raw stock down to 3/8” thickness.

Even then, I threw away 2 of the final 4 disks because of extremely uneven surface milling due to work movement.

Larger blocks of material would no doubt machine better, as you could hold them more deeply in a vise. But even then, what you do with small parts? Maybe hold the work with sandpaper between the jaws and somehow set up end stops and maybe vertical hold downs to keep all the edges from squirting out to one side or another. Or rig up a three jaw or four jaw chuck on the Milling table. Machining plastic is definitely a different world.

Glenn
Moderator - Grand Scale Forum

Motive power : 1902 A.S.Campbell 4-4-0 American - 12 5/8" gauge, 1955 Ottaway 4-4-0 American 12" gauge

Ahaha, Retirement: the good life - drifting endlessly on a Sea of projects....

rkcarguy
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Location: Wa State

Re: Woodinville Shops

Post by rkcarguy » Mon Jun 10, 2019 10:18 am

Glenn, when I need something like that I've been getting sheet from Amazon and then cutting my circle with a hole saw. If you need a "Custom" diameter, you can drill a hole in a piece of flat stock and clamp it to your belt sander table, and then pin the center and spin it.
I've worked with a fair amount of plastic and some of it is just crazy, even larger blocks will squirt right out of the mill vice.

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