Did anyone ever build a 2-10-10-4

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dash9
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Did anyone ever build a 2-10-10-4

Post by dash9 » Wed Oct 25, 2017 7:57 am

Wondering if anyone ever built a 2-10-10-4 in 7.5" gauge.
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dash9
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Re: Did anyone ever build a 2-10-10-4

Post by dash9 » Wed Oct 25, 2017 8:11 am

Never seen anything like this either.
Found them all at this website http://sbiii.com/bwrkapoc.html
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FLtenwheeler
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Re: Did anyone ever build a 2-10-10-4

Post by FLtenwheeler » Wed Oct 25, 2017 8:31 am

I know a Triplex has been built.

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Re: Did anyone ever build a 2-10-10-4

Post by cbrew » Wed Oct 25, 2017 8:42 am

FLtenwheeler wrote:I know a Triplex has been built.

Tim
This is built and owned by a friend of mine.
I understand no less then three built or being built around the usa.
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PRR5406
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Re: Did anyone ever build a 2-10-10-4

Post by PRR5406 » Wed Oct 25, 2017 9:26 am

That "prototype photo" is a Photoshop, for those unaware.
AFAIK, the Erie Triplex had the longest set of independent drivers, built as a Camelback, too, then converted to rear cab. The PRR duplex drives were also pretty complex. As far as most drivers on a rigid frame go, SP ran 4-10-2's and UP had the 9000 class 4-12-2 series (3 cylinder, to boot). Joe Mastrocco (did I get that right) has a PRR 4-4-6-4 Q2 duplex on a rigid frame. I hoped to see it at Mill Creek, but it didn't appear this year.
Must not forget the C&O 2-6-6-6 Allegheny's, the last (6) being a trailing truck.
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NP317
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Re: Did anyone ever build a 2-10-10-4

Post by NP317 » Wed Oct 25, 2017 9:59 am

And then there's this one. Gotta love PhotoShop.
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Fender
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Re: Did anyone ever build a 2-10-10-4

Post by Fender » Wed Oct 25, 2017 10:00 am

In terms of prototype practice, Santa Fe had a class of 2-10-10-2 locos that were built from 2-10-2s. Later, they were rebuilt back into 2-10-2s, so apparently the experiment was not successful.
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Atkinson_Railroad
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Re: Did anyone ever build a 2-10-10-4

Post by Atkinson_Railroad » Wed Oct 25, 2017 12:11 pm

Photoshop is one thing to contend with. What about information on the Internet in general?

From Edwin P. Alexander’s 1950 book AMERICAN LOCOMOTIVES A Pictorial Record of Steam Power;
it states the “Sacred Cow” was the longest steam locomotive ever built, and the heaviest as well.

Compare the data in his book (in attachment) with what’s at the randomly found website URL below.

http://www.american-rails.com/m-1.html

The book says the engine was 154’-3/4” length over pulling faces of couplers, complete with a drawing.

Scrolling the data at the random website above states the locomotive measured 106’ long.

Which one is correct? The book published in 1950, or the present day website?

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Re: Did anyone ever build a 2-10-10-4

Post by ElWet » Wed Oct 25, 2017 1:07 pm

The 2-10-10-2s were built before the Superpower era. The boilers were woefully too small for mainline work. It is amazing anyone thought this design would have enough "umpph" to power 4 large cylinders at (slogging) speed. Had this experiment been conducted 20+ years later, the results would have been much more positive. In the early years of the 20th century the Santa Fe experimented a lot, and failed a lot. But, they learned the most important factor was machine up time. So later locomotives were designed to run longer distances with less maintenance.

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Re: Did anyone ever build a 2-10-10-4

Post by Kimball McGinley » Wed Oct 25, 2017 2:03 pm

Dang it! A 2-10-10-4 would be awesome. I guess I'll have to rip apart my nearly completed 2-10-10-2 and make it bigger! Maybe a 6-12-12-8 would do????

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Re: Did anyone ever build a 2-10-10-4

Post by cp4449 » Wed Oct 25, 2017 2:25 pm

Kimball McGinley wrote:Dang it! A 2-10-10-4 would be awesome. I guess I'll have to rip apart my nearly completed 2-10-10-2 and make it bigger! Maybe a 6-12-12-8 would do????
It would straighten out to many curves in the US, Canada, and The rest of the world.....

Would be interesting.
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Re: Did anyone ever build a 2-10-10-4

Post by Pontiacguy1 » Wed Oct 25, 2017 3:01 pm

As far as I know, there was never a 2-10-10-4 locomotive produced anywhere for any company. I'd like to see proof if there was any out there. The DM&IR had a real nice fleet of 2-8-8-4s, the N&W had a huge fleet of Y6 series 2-8-8-2s, and of course everyone knows about the UP's 4-8-8-4s. Yes, there were a few 2-10-10-2s produced, but this was never a very common design and didn't last too long either. Also, the H8 2-6-6-6 Alleghenies were huge behemoths that actually produced more boiler HP than the Big-Boys.

The Erie triplex was not a very successful design by the railroad's standards, and the locomotive was broken up into two separate locomotives not too long afterward. From what I understand it just didn't draft good enough. I know that one has been built in 1/8th scale

Gotta be careful what you find on the internet... Somewhere a few years ago, someone showed a picture of a 2-12-12-2 that was supposedly built in Russia or something. The Russians did build a 4-14-2 at one point, or some wheel arrangement with 14 coupled wheels. They tried to run it, but supposedly it damaged the track in a curve and was towed back to the factory, where it sat for a couple of years before being cut up. Those long rigid wheelbases just don't like the curves too much. The UP 4-12-2s were about the longest rigid wheelbase that was used on a successful locomotive, although they were quickly replaced by the 4-6-6-4 Challengers.

Biggest problem with building any of these in any of the small scales is that our curves are a lot tighter than the prototype, so it would have to be modified a lot and you still might not find any tracks where it would run.

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