0-6-0 L9 Switcher, differences

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rkcarguy
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0-6-0 L9 Switcher, differences

Post by rkcarguy » Fri Dec 29, 2017 3:12 pm

Its interesting the differences in the these switchers, most models of this have different cylinders, and equal wheel spacing.
Apparently, the "L9" is what sets these apart from the typical 0-6-0?
#1070 resides pretty close to where I live, and is available to view and measure if I wish. It will probably be the engine I will model in 12" gage, if I decide to build a steamer in the future.
I'd love some more info/pics if anyone can shed some light on the history and differences in the L9 versions.
Attachments
060drawing740.jpg
Northern_Pacific_1070.jpg

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LVRR2095
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Re: 0-6-0 L9 Switcher, differences

Post by LVRR2095 » Fri Dec 29, 2017 5:43 pm

I’m not sure I understand what “L9” is that referring to in your post.

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ALCOSTEAM
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Re: 0-6-0 L9 Switcher, differences

Post by ALCOSTEAM » Fri Dec 29, 2017 7:43 pm

Railroads classified their engines by class rather than saying its an 0-6-0, in this case the Northern Pacific called this version of their 0-6-0's the L9 class. Many engine wheel arrangements also have a name. 2-8-2's are considered Mikado's. The Northern Pacific 2600's were A class 4-8-4 Northerns.

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Re: 0-6-0 L9 Switcher, differences

Post by RCRR » Sat Dec 30, 2017 12:10 am

Based on the wheel spacing and inside valve gear, I would guess this was a pre-ww1 era engine. She looks very similar to ALCo switchers built in New Hampshire in the first decade of the 20th century.

RCRR
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Re: 0-6-0 L9 Switcher, differences

Post by RCRR » Sat Dec 30, 2017 12:24 am

https://070727e4-a-62cb3a1a-s-sites.goo ... edirects=0
Check out this site showing some similar B&M engines that came ALCo Manchester, NH around 1911.
http://sites.google.com/site/bostonandm ... ss-f-and-g

After a bit of research, it looks like 1070 really was a Manchester engine! (Although there is one source that says Rogers). I went to college in the old mill buildings next door to what was known as Amoskeag Manufacturing. This eventually became Manchester Locomotive Works and then ALCo Manchester. In one of my side ventures I briefly worked in a prototyping machine shop in a mill that was likely part of the old shops.

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LVRR2095
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Re: 0-6-0 L9 Switcher, differences

Post by LVRR2095 » Sat Dec 30, 2017 6:45 am

ALCOSTEAM wrote:Railroads classified their engines by class rather than saying its an 0-6-0, in this case the Northern Pacific called this version of their 0-6-0's the L9 class. Many engine wheel arrangements also have a name. 2-8-2's are considered Mikado's. The Northern Pacific 2600's were A class 4-8-4 Northerns.
Just calling a loco an L-9 doesn’t tell folks from away what you are talking about. If you say NP Class L-9 I would have known you were talking about a specific locomotive. You also mention names for wheel arrangements, this too is frequently road specific and doesn’t tell folks from out of your area what you are talking about. I was an engineer on the Lehigh Valley Railroad and the LV’s 4-8-4 locomotives were NOT Northerns, they were Wyomings. And on the DL&W they were Poconos.

Glenn Brooks
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Re: 0-6-0 L9 Switcher, differences

Post by Glenn Brooks » Sat Dec 30, 2017 12:23 pm

Another interesting tidbit I recently discovered about NP class designation is the NP numbered each class loco sequentially. So in this case, Ryan’s loco posted above would have been the ninth L class 0-6-0 switcher added to their roster.

Also for some reason I don’t understand, sometimes the same wheel configuration would be listed in two different class rosters. Early day Great Northern (NP successor) 4-4-0’s for example are listed as both Class B and Class C engines. I suppose some redesign or upgrade made them significantly different enuf to roster them with different class names.

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Motive power : 1902 A.S.Campbell 4-4-0 American - 12 5/8" gauge, 1955 Ottaway 4-4-0 American 12" gauge

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RCRR
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Re: 0-6-0 L9 Switcher, differences

Post by RCRR » Sat Dec 30, 2017 2:07 pm

Maybe the 4-4-0s were rebuilt? Coal conversions and superheaters added...

rkcarguy
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Re: 0-6-0 L9 Switcher, differences

Post by rkcarguy » Tue Jan 02, 2018 11:55 am

A google image search shows an NP #1051 and #1040 also, same type of locomotive as the #1070.

Oh, here we go!

http://www.lakewhatcomrailway.com/steam ... photos.htm

RCRR, you are correct, it appears to be a Manchester Locomotive.

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Re: 0-6-0 L9 Switcher, differences

Post by Kimball McGinley » Tue Jan 02, 2018 3:16 pm

I don't know if this helps, but there are two very different 0-6-0's at Travel Town in LA CA. One has slide valves and at low-slung boiler with a keyhole firebox down between the frames. The other has piston valves and a bigger, higher boiler with a large firebox that spreads above and outside the top o f the frame.

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NP317
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Re: 0-6-0 L9 Switcher, differences

Post by NP317 » Tue Jan 02, 2018 7:38 pm

rkcarguy wrote:A google image search shows an NP #1051 and #1040 also, same type of locomotive as the #1070.

Oh, here we go!

http://www.lakewhatcomrailway.com/steam ... photos.htm

RCRR, you are correct, it appears to be a Manchester Locomotive.
Boy, that first photo rang some history bells.
Four of those pictured with #1070 were founders of the original Puget Sound Railway Historical Association, now known as the Northwest Railway Museum, in Snoqualmie Washington.
https://trainmuseum.org

Thank you to all of those founders, who preserved much of what survives today.
~RN

rkcarguy
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Re: 0-6-0 L9 Switcher, differences

Post by rkcarguy » Wed Jan 03, 2018 11:34 am

This steam engine ran a short track for tourism a few times a year for the lake Whatcom railway. Sadly, people move in and then complain about the noise and smell, so the route was reduced and the locomotive mothballed in favor of an Also diesel which they still run. I guess she also has boiler issues now. I rode on this under steam power as a kid with my parents.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ubhMWMbxyic

Here is a video I just found of her being put to work! There was a massive flood which undermined one of the bridge supports and stranded some freight, and BN had #1070 move it:)

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