Clippard check valves

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Fred_V
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Clippard check valves

Post by Fred_V » Tue Feb 20, 2018 12:38 pm

Their MCV-1 check valve is rated for 230#. Has anyone used them on the steamchest as an oil check?
Fred V
Fred V
Pensacola, Fl.

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rkepler
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Re: Clippard check valves

Post by rkepler » Tue Feb 20, 2018 3:20 pm

I've seen them used as check valves on a lubricator. I think I'd replace any o-rings in them if they were used closer to the steam line - I see a max temp of 230 degF.

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Fred_V
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Re: Clippard check valves

Post by Fred_V » Wed Feb 21, 2018 8:33 am

I don't think they can be taken apart. Maybe get new ones and insert them in the oil line. This is on a friends engine and I'll look to see what the luber has for check valves.
Fred V
Pensacola, Fl.

RET
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Re: Clippard check valves

Post by RET » Wed Feb 21, 2018 9:00 pm

Hi Fred_V,

If you are interested, here's a cylinder oil check valve of my own design. The only moving parts are two Viton "O" rings, one acts as a valve and the other acts as a spring for the sealing "O" ring. The sealing "O" ring seals against the flat face inside the valve body. The design in the drawing is for 3 1/2" gauge, but it should be easy to scale up for 7 1/4 or 7 1/2 or because of the low flow, the valve could probably be used in 1/8" scale as is.

I designed this after fighting with the conventional ball check design; the least little bit of dirt caused it to leak and blow all the oil out of the lubricator.
Check Valvea.jpg
Check valve is the left side of the drawing
Since I installed this design, I've never had a problem. In the drawing, the left side is the check valve and the right is the conventional automatic drain cock design. While the drain cock is OK, the check valve is better.

Richard Trounce.

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Builder01
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Re: Clippard check valves

Post by Builder01 » Thu Feb 22, 2018 5:32 am

Hi Richard,

Thank you for posting this drawing. Is it possible to post a slightly higher res version of it? The drawing is pretty hard to read at this low res.

Thanks again,
David

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Fred_V
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Re: Clippard check valves

Post by Fred_V » Thu Feb 22, 2018 6:54 am

Thanks Richard. I have made many o-ring type check valves that work much like the ball check but with an o-ring seat and a stem inside rather than the ball. They are fool proof.
Fred V
Pensacola, Fl.

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cbrew
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Re: Clippard check valves

Post by cbrew » Thu Feb 22, 2018 9:00 am

yes, well i used the MCV-1BB. they have been in service in the oil lines for about 10 years. zero issues. they are placed about half way between the lubricator and the steam chest.
during the american rebuild. i fabbed up a mounting block, the checks are feeding from the button up. the two circuits are isolated
Attachments
IMG_20180107_121115.jpg
If it is not live steam. its not worth it.

RET
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Location: Toronto, Canada

Re: Clippard check valves

Post by RET » Thu Feb 22, 2018 9:21 am

Hi Fred_V,

My check valves are usually made with a stainless steel ball on a Viton "O" ring seat and they work very well.

When I started designing this one, that's what I started with but as I looked at it, I thought it would be better without the ball (remember KISS?) and so this is what I came up with. I used one for each cylinder in the Boston & Albany and they work perfectly, just install them and forget it!

My experience has been that a check valve with a soft seat is much more reliable and foolproof so I try to design with that in mind. While I can recommend the Clippard line, I also find it is easier and simpler in most cases to make my own custom designed valves and fittings. That way I can tailor the look to suit the appearance I want and it suits the application better.

Yes, the drawing is difficult to read although it is perfect in Anvil 1000. Perhaps when I break it up into two parts it will be better.
Check Valve-b.jpg
Check Valve-c.jpg
Second half of check valve drawing
Check Valve-c.jpg (17.08 KiB) Viewed 802 times
Hope this helps.

Richard Trounce.

RET
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Location: Toronto, Canada

Re: Clippard check valves

Post by RET » Thu Feb 22, 2018 9:33 am

Hi,

For some reason the second drawing does not enlarge when you click on it. I think it is readable the way it is. Sorry about that.

A little explanation might help. The body is drilled with a "J" drill and then you use a 1/4" dia. end mill to put a flat on the bottom of the inside of the hole. "J" is the tap drill for 5/16-32 M.E. thread. You could probably use N.F. thread instead if you wished. The flat serves as a seat for the "O" ring. The "O" rings fit over the pin on the end of the base plug and the pin prevents the "O" ring from collapsing under steam pressure as well as keeping the "O" rings in position. Its about as simple as you can get for a reliable low flow check valve.

Richard Trounce.

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