EARLY 4-6-6-4 CHALLENGER. FRAME

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Cary Stewart
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Joined: Wed Jun 08, 2011 5:54 pm

Re: EARLY 4-6-6-4 CHALLENGER. FRAME

Post by Cary Stewart » Tue Feb 27, 2018 9:23 pm

A locomotive that is in production and has been for over a decade is Jim Kreider's Nickel Plate Bershire 2-8-4 in 1.5" scale. He wanted to cast the whole thing as one bed casting but the cost was way to much to sell. His compromise was to make major parts that would assemble in to a frame that unless you look very carefully you would think it was a one piece casting. His detail extends into areas that once built you can not see. These bed castings also serve to add weight in the right places and helps to lower the center of gravity.
Prior to making one piece loco beds including the cylinders and saddles there were cast side frame and cast spreaders. The Virginia & Truckee No. 27 has (I think) bar frames that were made with vanadium steel which was in 1913 a very advanced metal. At least on frame has Vanadium marked on it. I don't know when cast frames came into general use. Probably in the 1920s.
Cary

EVGEN
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Joined: Wed Jun 26, 2013 9:40 am
Location: Minsk, Belarus

Re: EARLY 4-6-6-4 CHALLENGER. FRAME

Post by EVGEN » Wed Feb 28, 2018 1:29 pm

I sent a request for the Union Pacific Historical Society. Maybe they can answer my question.
Just in case, I want to ask how realistic it is to get the drawings of a locomotive Southern Pacific cab forward? Where does the search begin?

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NP317
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Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2014 2:57 pm
Location: Northern Oregon

Re: EARLY 4-6-6-4 CHALLENGER. FRAME

Post by NP317 » Wed Feb 28, 2018 8:51 pm

EVGEN wrote:
Wed Feb 28, 2018 1:29 pm
I sent a request for the Union Pacific Historical Society. Maybe they can answer my question.
Just in case, I want to ask how realistic it is to get the drawings of a locomotive Southern Pacific cab forward? Where does the search begin?
Contact the California State Railroad Museum, in Sacramento.
That's where the sole surviving Cab Forward lives, along with the extensive Southern Pacific RR documents and records.
~RN

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