Museum of Obsolete Drafting Technology

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Atkinson_Railroad
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Museum of Obsolete Drafting Technology

Post by Atkinson_Railroad » Sat Sep 29, 2018 4:52 pm

The recent chatter related to new, (CNC) verses the old (talented use of hands) way of doing things... certainly establishes passionate opinions.
Some of you among the board may appreciate the website of, Museum of Obsolete Drafting Technology.

I found the page link of "curves"... well... I'll let you find it too.

There is something about a plain ole piece of paper and a pencil or pen that can still work quite well.
(I especially enjoy how neither require electricity for them to be operated ; )

Here's the URL: https://www.moodt.org/exhibis/

John

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Builder01
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Re: Museum of Obsolete Drafting Technology

Post by Builder01 » Sat Sep 29, 2018 5:31 pm

No. 27, that's the best! (probably would not make it past H.R. today).

David

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Re: Museum of Obsolete Drafting Technology

Post by Asteamhead » Sat Sep 29, 2018 5:37 pm

Hi John,
Very nice case filled with good old tools! Weren't bad times these tools were all we had! When I wrote my diploma work, the first HP handheld calculator was a revolution then (and is still fine for technical calculations). At the time I normally used an elder calculator stick which my Prof. saw and commented 'you should tar this old tool once again'. And then he showed his own to me: made of aluminium during wartime but still his personal tool.
Never to forget which wonders the former generations performed with just those simple tools!
When I started building my A 1239 of the N&W, the fine book 'The A - Mercedes of Steam' by Ed King inspired me. On page 35 there is a photo of the Mechanical Engeneering Office with Mr. John A. Pilcher and his staff: Just some wodden desks, a lot of papers and spittoons. In spite of that a superb result by the construction and building prototype 1200 in about one year! Hats off :!: !

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Fender
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Re: Museum of Obsolete Drafting Technology

Post by Fender » Sat Sep 29, 2018 8:28 pm

Still have my drafting tools from 1967! And my father’s from 1944!
Dan Watson

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NP317
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Re: Museum of Obsolete Drafting Technology

Post by NP317 » Sat Sep 29, 2018 9:53 pm

Fender wrote:
Sat Sep 29, 2018 8:28 pm
Still have my drafting tools from 1967! And my father’s from 1944!
Same here.
And occasionally they are still useful.
~RN

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Re: Museum of Obsolete Drafting Technology

Post by mspetersen » Sat Sep 29, 2018 10:05 pm

I remember in the fall of 74 or 75 being the last class they taught how to use a Slide Rule in High School Chemistry class. By that Christmas most people had gotten simple calculators and as that was the end of Slide Rules in our school. I still have mine and to my kids it might as well be an abacus.
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Re: Museum of Obsolete Drafting Technology

Post by BigDumbDinosaur » Sat Sep 29, 2018 11:03 pm

I still have some of my manual drafting tools from many years ago. Alas, I no longer have my log-log slide rule.
——————————
Science makes it known. Engineering makes it work.

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Fred_V
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Re: Museum of Obsolete Drafting Technology

Post by Fred_V » Sun Sep 30, 2018 7:36 am

i always loved drafting. Took it in highschool and college. i still have my set that was my grandfather's and passed down to me.
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Greg_Lewis
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Re: Museum of Obsolete Drafting Technology

Post by Greg_Lewis » Sun Sep 30, 2018 11:20 am

I got a B in drafting back in 1958. The B is because the instructor found fault with my arrowheads. I'm still struggling with that (both the trauma and the arrowheads).

I have four slide rules and I still use them from time to time. A calculator will give you a precise value, which is sometimes needed. A slide rule will show you a value in relation to the other values on the continuum, which also is sometimes needed.
Greg Lewis, Prop.
Eyeball Engineering — Home of non-interchangeable parts.
Our motto: "That looks about right."
Celebrating 30 years of turning perfectly good metal into bits of useless scrap.

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Fender
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Re: Museum of Obsolete Drafting Technology

Post by Fender » Sun Sep 30, 2018 12:09 pm

Thankful that I didn’t have to learn drafting with ink on starched linen. I have an original 1912 Baldwin ink drawing of loco cylinders on linen that is a work of art. But it had to be done right the first time; there was no edit->undo!
Dan Watson

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Re: Museum of Obsolete Drafting Technology

Post by rrnut-2 » Mon Oct 01, 2018 12:34 pm

I remember that in '75 my tuition for the semester at the college was the same price as an HP calculator. But if the math professor saw you using a calculator, you flunked his course. The electronics professors didn't care.

I got an associates degree in Drafting in '73 but quickly learned that there was no money in it. Moved on to Electrical Engineering. I still have my drafting tools, except for the table, took up too much room.

Jim B

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Re: Museum of Obsolete Drafting Technology

Post by Comstock-Friend » Mon Oct 01, 2018 12:44 pm

I just dropped off a dozen plus Lockheed P-38 drawings, ink on linen, to the P-38 National Association. Didn't find my Dad's name in any of the check boxes, but many former guests of my folks at cocktail parties over the years.
20180809_150512 small.jpg
20180809_150750 small.jpg
The typical curves you got at the stationary store were pretty useless for engineering. Ship's curves are the necessary ones; but thank god for CAD. I liked to draw with pencil and vellum but LOVE to draw in CAD, so much easier and useful as you can make it nuts on for what you are doing. And changes, well, no eraser marks!

John

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