Trailer Features

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Greg_Lewis
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Re: Trailer Features

Post by Greg_Lewis » Wed Jun 22, 2011 4:13 am

doublereefed wrote:I'm zeroing in on a 7x16.

If the 8x is not too much more, consider that. Also check to see if there are inside wheel wells or not.

Also, David T above mentions tongue weight. BE SURE TO CHECK THE CAPACITY OF YOUR HITCH ON THE TRUCK. Not all receiver hitches are the same. I discovered that mine was not rated for the weight I was putting on it after a couple of friends saw it flexing when I was pulling into a meet. I promptly replaced it. A hitch failure is a potentially deadly thing.
Greg Lewis, Prop.
Eyeball Engineering — Home of non-interchangeable parts.
Our motto: "That looks about right."
Celebrating 30 years of turning perfectly good metal into bits of useless scrap.

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makinsmoke
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Re: Trailer Features

Post by makinsmoke » Wed Jun 22, 2011 8:21 am

What I did (do) is tie the heaviest equipment centered over the axle(s) as best I can. That way I have relatively equal weight on either side of the axles.
Basically a balanced fulcrum. This helps the tongue weight issue.

Also, what I found with a 7 x 10 versus a 7 x 12 (both empty) is the 7 x 10 kept swaying all over the road. Fought that thing like a bad dog from the house back to the dealer when I traded it for the 12. I have no idea how the wife got it home. And yes, I've been pulling trailers alll my life.

The 7 x 12 on the other hand pulls empty or loaded like it wasn't even there.

I can see where weight balance is important in tracking, but am also convinced that there is a length ratio that also determines a trailer's tracking qualities.
Would never have believed that 2 feet would have made that much difference, but it did. BTW, outside wheel wells, and if I'd do it again I'd go for two axles, whether a 12 or not. Of course with a 16 you'll get two axles.

Don't forget to paint and undercoat that trailer.

Brian

Superberky1204
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Re: Trailer Features

Post by Superberky1204 » Thu Jun 23, 2011 9:27 am

In 1999 I started with a flat 16 ft trailer. later I got a used 20 ft x 8 box trailer. In 2004 I bought a 24 ft x 8 ft Wells cargo trailer. One of the best as i see it. I can haul 2 locomotives, 18 cars, tools fuel and suitcases and anything else I can put in it. It grosses out at 9700 pounds. I pull it with a Ford E-350 van with 6.0 diesel. I can average 11.4 mpg running at 65 mph in cruise constantly. I also have a Wells Cargo 7x14 trailer and wish it was a 8 x 16. It carries 1 inch scale trains.

You can never have too large of a trailer. I get 4 tracks wide in the 24 by having racks above the fenders 2 high. I made brackets to hold the equipment and all etrack on the floor. 1/4 x 1 flat steel for rails. NO TRIPPING. I did 3 trailers like this for other friends.

Remember you will have coal, gasoline, and/or fuel oil in the trailer with tool boxes and other things you will not count on when buying. You will have to get in there to tie down and do other stuff. Think before you buy and add next size up. You won't regret it. 7x14 ft is an odd ball size.

I have 101,000 miles on the van and about 60,000 miles on the Wells trail with no incedents. Getting ready for another trip to Train Mountain next year.

Good luck

Bruce Saylor, in PA.

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makinsmoke
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Re: Trailer Features

Post by makinsmoke » Thu Jun 23, 2011 10:24 pm

Sorry,
Forgot the Live Diesel guys at Yahoo Groups have been saving trailer stuff in one of their photo files:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/livediese ... 5/pic/list

1000 ways to skin a cat.

Not sure. Maybe Saylor has them all beat. He can take the side racks out quickly so the trailer is essentially empty for hauling....

Brian

hammermill
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Re: Trailer Features

Post by hammermill » Fri Jun 24, 2011 8:28 am

i just tired a trailer and the 8 ply tires were less expensive than the 6 ply. go figure

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steamin10
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Re: Trailer Features

Post by steamin10 » Fri Jun 24, 2011 11:52 am

Hammer and others: 8 ply will hold heat more than 6 if you allow low air. I vote for the 8's, for more road gator protection. I drove brand new class A RV's, class B's and Custom vans and all manor of trailers in delivery. I have enough tire stories to bore you to death, or make your hair stand up, like mine did on occasion.

The point here is ASSUME nothing. Everytime you hook up for a pull, go through the ritual of tire checks, lug checks, safty chains, wiring conections, spares, tool kit and jack. The whole mess. Start early, check everything a day or two before, like Wednesday. If you find a bad tire, or wiring mouse eaten, 5 o'clock Saturday morning, is not the time to be fooling with it, doing a half baked job just to get on the road. Ya, I did it. Once bit, twice smart. Preparation is key to a good trip, and lots of fun. Preparation lowers your risk, and really touching and servicing these machines we own should be a mark of pride anyway.

You cant make the excuse you dont have time. Put down the coffee, the paper, turn off the TV, and I LOVE LUCy, and get in gear. Besides, the more familiar you are with the equipment, the less questions you will have when something goes South on ya, and it will, it always does.
Big Dave, former Millwright, Electrician, Environmental conditioning, and back yard Fixxit guy. Now retired, persuing boats, trains, and broken relics.
We have enough youth, how about a fountain of Smart. My computer beat me at chess, but not kickboxing
It is not getting caught in the rain, its learning to dance in it. People saying good morning, should have to prove it.

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Dave_Johnson
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Re: Trailer Features

Post by Dave_Johnson » Sun Jun 26, 2011 9:48 am

makinsmoke wrote:
Not sure. Maybe Saylor has them all beat. He can take the side racks out quickly so the trailer is essentially empty for hauling....

Brian
I now own Bruces 20 ft trailer. It is set up just like his current 24 footer. My wife had to use the trailer to haul a load of furniture a couple of years ago. Bruce and I removed the racks in about 30 mintues. We left the E track and steel strip rail on the floor. My wife and I put the racks back in the trailer without any difficulty. Time was about 30 minutes. Most of that time is spent rebolting everything in place.

Dave J.

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Dave_Johnson
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Re: Trailer Features

Post by Dave_Johnson » Sun Jun 26, 2011 9:55 am

Go for inside wheel wells. I believe all axles are the same length. The extra space will make it easier to move around inside the trailer.

On Bruce's trailers, the side racks are built above the wheel wells, The space under the bottom tracks works well for storage.

Dave J.

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Dave_Johnson
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Re: Trailer Features

Post by Dave_Johnson » Sun Jun 26, 2011 10:17 am

Attached are pics of Bruce's clamps. 1 in. square tubing works best for the racks. I believe that if angle were used it would not be as strong.

Dave J.
Attachments
P1010538.JPG
End clamp, used on side rack to hold down cars.
P1010542.JPG
P1010543.JPG
P1010544.JPG
End clamp installed on rack. Coupler fits under the channel.
P1010546.JPG
Clamp for between cars. Couplers of two cars fit under the top plate
P1010547.JPG
P1010548.JPG
DSC01867.JPG

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steamin10
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Re: Trailer Features

Post by steamin10 » Sun Jun 26, 2011 12:37 pm

Wow, looks like a wharehouse.

There is not an accepted standard, only an accepted practice for market axles that the builders use, for their needs. That sounds like splitting hairs, but that is the fact. The stubs can be welded on to whatever beam or tube is used in the end product, and is just a matter of moving the dimensions around for the need.

Axles can be ordered any length, even oversize, ( not road legal ) for special purpose and permitted wide load equipment.

Indiana has invoked a law ( 2008 IIRC) that disallows unapproved designs, due to breakaways and homebuilt involvements with accidents. So if you want to build a car trailer, you must pick and follow a pre-approved design. There is no more cutting a truck frame and making a box sand hauling trailer of the reamains. Major builders of course send in an engineered set of drawings. With the stress loadings and figures to get appoval for production.

The 2 Flattops I have would not be allowed under the new rules, even tho they are frames from commercial travel and house trailers.
Last edited by steamin10 on Mon Jun 27, 2011 1:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Big Dave, former Millwright, Electrician, Environmental conditioning, and back yard Fixxit guy. Now retired, persuing boats, trains, and broken relics.
We have enough youth, how about a fountain of Smart. My computer beat me at chess, but not kickboxing
It is not getting caught in the rain, its learning to dance in it. People saying good morning, should have to prove it.

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Greg_Lewis
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Re: Trailer Features

Post by Greg_Lewis » Sun Jun 26, 2011 3:49 pm

steamin10 wrote: Indiana has invoked a law ( 2008 IIRC) that disallows unapproved designs, due to breakaways and homebuilt involvements with accidents. So I you want to build a car trailer, you must pick and follow a pre-approved design. There is no more cutting a truck frame and making a box sand hauling trailer of the reamains. Major builders of course send in an engineered set of drawings. With the stress loadings and figures to get appoval for production.
Be sure to crawl underneath and inspect any trailer you plan to buy before handing over the check. The first one I bought had horrible welds and within a year a piece "welded" to the tongue fell off by itself.
Greg Lewis, Prop.
Eyeball Engineering — Home of non-interchangeable parts.
Our motto: "That looks about right."
Celebrating 30 years of turning perfectly good metal into bits of useless scrap.

Harold_V
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Re: Trailer Features

Post by Harold_V » Sun Jun 26, 2011 4:32 pm

Greg_Lewis wrote:Be sure to crawl underneath and inspect any trailer you plan to buy before handing over the check. The first one I bought had horrible welds and within a year a piece "welded" to the tongue fell off by itself.
I have long believed that welding is one craft that is treated with little respect. Rarely does one encounter a guy that doesn't think of himself as being a "weldor", but that's hardly the truth.
Having taken two years of welding at the local community college, years ago, and having worked as a machinist/toolmaker, it became obvious to me that welding is one of the more demanding of ones abilities when considering the skilled trades. It requires considerable experience in order to make acceptable quality welds and do them reliably.

When I moved to Washington, one of the things that was loaded in one of my containers was a three ton (capacity) lift truck. Curb weight is five tons. In order to prevent any movement once inside, I chose to weld studs to the main frame of the container, to which I attached some steel channel, eliminating movement by restraining the wheels. In spite of my two years of welding, I had the instructor of the class, an excellent weldor, come to my place and do the welding. I didn't want a failure.

No, I do not claim to be a weldor. Not by a long shot.

Harold
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

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