Hand Turning Rest

Topics include, Machine Tools & Tooling, Precision Measuring, Materials and their Properties, Electrical discussions related to machine tools, setups, fixtures and jigs and other general discussion related to amateur machining.

Moderators: Harold_V, websterz, GlennW

Post Reply
User avatar
Old Biker UK
Posts: 67
Joined: Tue Dec 04, 2007 4:30 pm
Location: Somerset, UK

Hand Turning Rest

Post by Old Biker UK » Wed Dec 12, 2007 4:39 pm

The latest addition to my workshop kit is a Pultra 1570 lathe, it came with a few collets, chucks etc., but no hand turning rest.
After a few little jobs using the toolbit as a rest I decided to make one.
It is all from the scrap box with the base & rest in cast iron, the other bits in mild steel.
Anyone who wants to learn about lathe tool cutting angles for different materials should try hand turning. :wink:
Image
Mark

Jose Rivera
Posts: 3803
Joined: Wed Feb 21, 2007 9:21 pm
Location: Vallejo California

Hand turnig

Post by Jose Rivera » Wed Dec 12, 2007 5:22 pm

You mean ... like wood turning ?

Never heard about but I guess it is possible.
I can see creating shapes a lot easier that with the cranks on the crosslide and carriage.

You're showing the tool rest, now, show us the tools you use !!

kapullen
Posts: 742
Joined: Thu Nov 06, 2003 9:30 pm

Post by kapullen » Thu Dec 13, 2007 7:53 am

OB,

Looks handy.

George Thomas wrote one of these up in Model Engineer years ago (70's).

Nice tool for chamfers, and hand turning fine contours.

Watchmakers used these almost exclusively for turning pivots and such.

Our Darbyshire Lathe has one.

I cheated, and bought a crosslide attachment at Cabin Fever a

couple years ago for it.

Kap
Fadal Turn, Fadal Vmc 15, Prototrak 16 x 30 Cnc Lathe, Pratt and Whitney 16 x 54 lathe, Pratt and Whitney Vertical Shaper, G & E 16" Shaper, B & O Electric turret lathe, 36" Doall band saw,
Enco B.P. Clone, Bridgeport CNC Mill, Delta 12" Surface Grinder.

User avatar
Old Biker UK
Posts: 67
Joined: Tue Dec 04, 2007 4:30 pm
Location: Somerset, UK

Post by Old Biker UK » Thu Dec 13, 2007 7:55 am

Hand turning is a common practice amongst watch & clock makers.
The techniques for turning metal & other hard materials differs from wood turning, also the tools are totally different.
Here are a few of mine with some examples of work.
Image
Image
Image

The tools are nearly all re-used files with the exception of one which is HS steel, I much prefer the carbon steel as it takes a far better edge.
The same results could be obtained by making form tools but in the case of the 1/4" balls on the hand rest I doubt a form tool would be successful, the blank material for the balls is only screwed onto an 1/8" rod by 3/16" thread and with a hand tool fine cuts can be taken whereas with a form tool its all or nothing, cutting the full diameter at once.
I guess with CNC the radii & forms could be programmed but where is the fun in that !
Mark

Mcgyver
Posts: 241
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2006 6:39 pm
Location: Toronto

Post by Mcgyver » Thu Dec 13, 2007 8:58 am

Mark as always your stuff looks great, the decorative brass knobs look fantastic. A real Victorian look to it, reminiscent of the days when aesthetics mattered. how did you make the beaded knurl? special homemade tool? I see a rope knurl there and thanks to FF know how to do that but i really like that bead knurl (if thats what its called)

keep the pics coming!

User avatar
Old Biker UK
Posts: 67
Joined: Tue Dec 04, 2007 4:30 pm
Location: Somerset, UK

Post by Old Biker UK » Thu Dec 13, 2007 9:34 am

Thanks Mac.
I thank FF for the rope knurls (and other stuff of his I have made), would never have thought of it myself.
The beaded one is simply a series of round-bottom holes (left in the pic), I used a dental burr as I didn't have a ball nosed cutter that small.
Image
It's a bit fiddly to get the diameter of the workpiece right (I don't do 'sums' !) so that the balls fit, but if they don't I simply reduce the dia. & try again.
Mark

Clemson
Posts: 70
Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 3:15 pm
Location: Upstate SC

Post by Clemson » Thu Dec 13, 2007 11:51 am

I've gotta try that!

Great post -- Thanks!

Clemson :D
South Bend 13x40 lathe
Millrite Vertical Milling Machine

Jose Rivera
Posts: 3803
Joined: Wed Feb 21, 2007 9:21 pm
Location: Vallejo California

Old tricks

Post by Jose Rivera » Thu Dec 13, 2007 12:09 pm

I know that you will be bringing good stuff to share.

Thanks for the postings.

Post Reply