My first project made on a lathe

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Ridgerunner
Posts: 120
Joined: Thu Mar 16, 2006 11:11 pm
Location: Near Atlanta, yet far enough away!

My first project made on a lathe

Post by Ridgerunner » Sat Mar 07, 2009 9:47 pm

I build models (mostly armor and aircraft) so my projects are usually small, in many cases utilizing a Dremel tool. I designed a way to mount my Dremel tool on my 10K. I have no machine training and this is my first project so it looks a little rough - just overlook it.

Basically I turned a collar and drilled and tapped a hole for an arm which I use to mount the apparatus to my QCTP (the arm is secured by a brass pin to stop it from unscrewing under vibration). The most difficult operation was the drilling and tapping of the 3/4" x 10 TPI hole through which I mounted my Dremel tool. Up to this point I had never cut a thread, plus I had no way of cutting an inside thread in a 3/4" hole so I had to buy a small boring bar and grind a 60* angle on the 1/8" bit so I could cut my inside thread. At any rate it works for me :D

The first picture shows the tool itself. The second photo shows how it mounts to my lathe and last photo shows it in use (yeah, I know grinding makes a terrible mess and it took me a lot of effort to clean up after this operation - but it had to be done).

Thanks for looking,
Gary Frost
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Satisfaction is using a tool whose capabilities exceed the abilities of its user.

Gunbuilder
Posts: 249
Joined: Fri Jul 14, 2006 9:41 pm
Location: North east South Dakota

Good Enough

Post by Gunbuilder » Sun Mar 08, 2009 10:38 am

Ridgerunner,
If it works like you want, it looks good enough to me.

I do not grind on my old South Bend, it cost too much. But it is your lathe so do as you see fit. I do break the rules and sometimes use emery cloth.

I am slowly improving on the quality of the work I do. I am still using as much scrap steel as I can so my projects don't look nice. The fit is getting better.

Just strive to make the projects you need then work on the fit and finish.

Thanks,
Paul

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GlennW
Posts: 6928
Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2007 9:23 am
Location: Florida

Post by GlennW » Sun Mar 08, 2009 11:11 am

At least you did the right thing and placed a towel of some sort over the bed ways efore grinding! Plastic under the towel may help.

I'm a little confused as to the orientation here. Is the tool post on the back side of the ways, or is the photo somehow reversed?
Glenn

Operating machines is perfectly safe......until you forget how dangerous it really is!

Ridgerunner
Posts: 120
Joined: Thu Mar 16, 2006 11:11 pm
Location: Near Atlanta, yet far enough away!

Post by Ridgerunner » Sun Mar 08, 2009 12:46 pm

Glenn,
The tool post is oriented so that the tool-holder is facing my 4 jaw chuck. The motor is disengaged so that the work is turned by hand; in this case a tin paint can as I needed .35" strips of tin which I could solder together for my next project. Worked like a charm.

I am fully aware of the potential damage to my machine from the grit which necessarily goes EVERYWHERE. I had it set up so that most all movement was done by the compound and not the saddle. Afterwards I spent extra time and effort cleaning and lubricating the whole machine. Yes, my lathe was an expensive investment, however it is a tool and if used properly and with care no damage will result. :wink:

This forum has been a great source of information and ideas for me as I usually just play voyeur and read what others post.

Gary Frost
Satisfaction is using a tool whose capabilities exceed the abilities of its user.

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