Converting Baldor buffer to grinder - ideas?

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Frank Ford
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Converting Baldor buffer to grinder - ideas?

Post by Frank Ford » Wed Aug 05, 2009 10:17 am

After reading about how some guys extend the shafts of their grinders to stick out beyond the wheel guards so they can mount buffing or wire wheels, it ocurred to me I could go the other way with my Baldor long-shaft buffer. Here's progress so far:

Image

I took the armature out and added some threads to both ends so I could mount the wheels inboard:

Image

The long shafts step down from 30mm to 1.125, and then to .750. That first step is a bare .056 difference in diameter, so I added some very tightly fitted clamp-on collars for extra security:


Image

And I made some 3/4" thick nuts to hold the grinding wheels on, along with a pin spanner:

Image


Next, I'll make some heavy steel wheel stabilizer flanges - 5/8 or so thick in the center, 4.5" diameter because that's the stock I have.

QUESTION #1 -

Should I "pin" the inner flange on each side so it can't rotate? That's how the buffer was originally set up, so I thought it might be a good thing to do with the grinding wheel flanges. Just a simple 1/8" roll pin and a keyway in the flange.

QUESTION #2 -

Anybody have a source for plans/ideas for wheel guards, & tool rest setups that might be appropriate for this project? It's a strong 1 HP motor, so I figure on using ten inch wheels, maybe 1-1/2" wide.
Cheers,

Frank Ford

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Bill Shields
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Wheel Stabilizer flanges

Post by Bill Shields » Wed Aug 05, 2009 11:44 am

Steel?

Never seen them in steel - always something else, or with a backing. Unless I am thinking of something else.

Watch your peripheral speed on the wheels. I don' t know how fast the motor spins, but you should neve exceed the BURST SPEED of a grinding wheel.

As for guards and rests....that is going to be a LOT of work..and as mentioned, possibly one of diminishing returns.

Did you thread left and right on the opposite ends? Cannot tell from photos. Looks like you are going about it well...

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Frank Ford
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Post by Frank Ford » Wed Aug 05, 2009 12:11 pm

Yep, left threads on left, right on right, same as regular grinders.

Lots of work? Well, I suppose, but I've been hot on machining for a short enough time that it's all still a learning process and adventure, so I figger, why not? I think Baldor wants something like 400 bucks for those nice cast guards.

I doubt surface speed will be an issue - its a regular 1800 RPM motor. In fact, my "real" grinder is also that speed. I could have had the speedy one, but they make me kinda edgy. (Tool sharpening pun intended.)
Cheers,

Frank Ford

Black_Moons
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Post by Black_Moons » Wed Aug 05, 2009 1:53 pm

Is that grinder/buffer reverseable? if so you'll definately want pins of some kind to keep the wheels from being able to loosen off the bolts.

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Frank Ford
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Post by Frank Ford » Wed Aug 05, 2009 2:31 pm

No, it's not reversible. I was just wondering if there's any reason not to fix those inner flanges from rotating.
Cheers,

Frank Ford

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Post by Jose Rivera » Wed Aug 05, 2009 7:17 pm

Frank, you're a genius !! :lol:
There are no problems, only solutions.
--------------
Retired journeyman machinist and 3D CAD mechanical designer - hobbyist - grandpa

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Steve_in_Mich
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Post by Steve_in_Mich » Thu Aug 06, 2009 1:41 am

Personally I wish for a double long shaft buffer so my reaction is, Oh NO!

I'll check to see what I have in cast wheel guards tomorrow. I have some NOS units but not sure if any are for 10" wheels.
Just because you don’t believe it - doesn’t mean it’s not so.

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Frank Ford
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Post by Frank Ford » Thu Aug 06, 2009 2:37 am

Steve_in_Mich wrote:Personally I wish for a double long shaft buffer so my reaction is, Oh NO!
Indeed, I hear you on that. I have so little space in my 18 x 18 shop I'm starting to get, er, "creative" in order to cram in "just one more tool," and I figured this is about the only way I can manage another grinder, so I'll sacrifice the clearance on the buffing wheels.
Cheers,

Frank Ford

Black_Moons
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Post by Black_Moons » Thu Aug 06, 2009 2:37 am

Iv seen some really nice home made wheel guards, its pertty easy if you can find some serious diamiter pipe to cut a few inchs off, or you can just hot bend some 3/16" steel into a C and weld to a plate.

In any case its a welding project :)
(unless you wanna mill a mold outta something cheap and... but thats another story)


steve: How about adding extention shafts to your current grinder then if you have a lathe? :) then drilling holes and pinning your extentions in with roll pins or something. (or a key thats held in place by the wheel mount)

Iv seen lots of do it yourself buffers and such too, using stock bearings with mounts and a pully, or just buying a double shaft motor. usally about $60~120 in materials if you have the motor kicking around.

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Steve_in_Mich
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Post by Steve_in_Mich » Thu Aug 06, 2009 2:13 pm

Frank, I'm not going to be any help on 10" wheel guards. I couldn't find my stash of guards but I am sure that this set is as big as I have and they are bigger than 8" but you couldn't fit a 10" wheel in them. These pieces were part of the stash at one time but got separated out and stored in shed out back. Last I saw them there was hardly a bit of rust on them.

As mentioned they can be fabricated pretty easily.

B_M, I need some good ~ 1" shafting for turning the buffs, brushes and flap wheels I want to use.
Last edited by Steve_in_Mich on Fri Aug 07, 2009 8:54 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Black_Moons
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Post by Black_Moons » Thu Aug 06, 2009 2:55 pm

Steve: So? If the weight is to much for just an extention shaft, buy 2 sets of bearings in blocks and make yourself a new shaft :)
http://www.briery.com/vortex/engine_com ... blocks.jpg something like those
+ a pully, motor, some lathe time to turn the shafts down as you want and put the threads and such on them.

yea yea you think its gonna look like <insert degoritory term here) but with some work it can look good.

http://www.hedgeandhazel.co.uk/userimages/039.JPG why just think you could have a wonderful buffer like that? no? looking for a liitle more HP? why kids you days..

http://lh4.ggpht.com/_HMZ_CESR6-Y/SXQjX ... re+004.jpg More high quality construction.

Okok so im not helping my case here...
http://www.motamedi.info/process_images/grinder.jpg Shows a grinder with the 'extention' shafts I was talking about applyed to it.
I saw someone here that made a nice one outta an open style motor pullyed to a front bearing block set with the wheels on either side, wooden 'case' around it to keep dust outta the motor/pullys/etc

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motor

Post by spro » Thu Aug 06, 2009 11:48 pm

Frank you do good work. That's a good motor too, nice extended bearing support. i guess you brought that in closer but I wouldn't exceed 8" wheels. That thing probably runs 3450 rpm and with even 6" it could be a really good grinder and very accessible for swivel tables and such. IMHO don't go too large for there is no benefit and a lot of problems at that speed.

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